Anne Birgitte Gotfredsen

Anne Birgitte Gotfredsen
University of Copenhagen · Globe Institute

Cand scient., Ph.D.

About

37
Publications
12,554
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266
Citations
Introduction

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
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The earliest finds of domestic cat in Denmark date back to the Roman Iron Age (c. 1–375 AD). Initially, cats occurred sparsely and only from the Viking Age (c. 850–1050 AD) did they become more frequent in numbers, though primarily in urban contexts and in connection with fur production. In medieval times, cats became beasts of pest control in rura...
Article
Full-text available
Determining the proportion of males and females in zooarchaeological assemblages can be used to reconstruct the diversity and severity of past anthropogenic impacts on animal populations, and can also provide valuable biological insights into past animal life-histories, behaviour and demography, including the effects of environmental change. Howeve...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, non‐human ancient DNA studies have begun to focus on larger sample sizes and whole genomes, offering the potential to reveal exciting and hitherto unknown answers to ongoing biological and archaeological questions. However, one major limitation to the feasibility of such studies is the substantial financial and time investments sti...
Article
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The Rødhals kitchen midden was located on a tiny stretch of land 18 km from the nearest major landmass in present-day Denmark. It dates to the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition, roughly 4300 to 3700 cal BC. Its inhabitants practiced a remarkably broad-scale exploitation of marine resources spanning from the collecting of mollusks on the seashore , ov...
Preprint
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The success and failure of past cultures across the Arctic was tightly coupled to the ability of past people to exploit the full range of resources available to them, and to adapt to fluctuations in resource availability. There is substantial evidence for the hunting of birds, caribou and a wide range of marine mammals in pre-historic Greenland fro...
Preprint
Full-text available
The transitions from foraging to farming and later to pastoralism in Stone Age Eurasia (c. 11-3 thousand years before present, BP) represent some of the most dramatic lifestyle changes in human evolution. We sequenced 317 genomes of primarily Mesolithic and Neolithic individuals from across Eurasia combined with radiocarbon dates, stable isotope da...
Article
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Peary Land, and in particular the area of Jørgen Brønlund Fjord and Wandel Dal, is the only place in Greenland where prehistoric muskox hunting sites are plentiful and investigated, and it gives a unique insight into prehistoric muskox hunting. In the mid-1900s, Eigil Knuth discovered the 4400 years old muskox hunting sites, which he believed corro...
Chapter
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The long-term history of walrus hunting by Inuit can be characterised by the stark contrast between the innovation and venturous nature of the hunters, and the relative ecological conservatism of their prey. In this chapter, we examine several aspects of walrus subsistence hunting by Inuit from their earliest occupations in Arctic/Subarctic Canada...
Article
Gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus) is the largest falcon in the world. It inhabits a wide range of climate zones in the Northern Hemisphere, from boreal forests in the south of its range to the arid polar deserts of the High Arctic. In Greenland, because of the harsh, remote environments in which gyrfalcons live, research related to the contemporary and...
Preprint
Full-text available
Determining the male and female representation in zooarchaeological material from hunted animal species is essential, to fully investigate the effects and means of prehistoric hunting practices, and may further provide valuable biological information on past animal life-history, behaviour and demography. However, the fragmented nature of the zooarc...
Chapter
Full-text available
Abstract: This paper explores the archaeozoological evidence of raptors potentially used as hawking birds at sites dating from the 7th – 17th centuries AD in present-day Denmark. Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) predominated amongst the hawking bird bones but sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus), peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) and kestrel (Falco tinuncul...
Article
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This article highlights the relationship between walruses and humans in and around the North Water polynya in a long-term perspective. The present study draws on a combination of biological, archaeological, archaeo-zoological, historical, and ethnographic sources covering the period from the 8th century AD to the late 20th century. The study demons...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
According to archaeological research, seals, whales and dolphins have been exploited by humans through time, although exploitation patterns and intensity have varied greatly between regions, time periods and cultures. The focus of this session, inspired by the newly formed ICAZ (International Council of Archaeozoology) Marine Mammal Working Group (...
Article
Full-text available
The promontory facing Storebælt with the well-known circular Viking Age military fortress of Trelleborg erected by Harold Bluetooth in AD 980/981 seems to have been an important ceremonial space prior to the erection of the fortress and contemporary with a nearby high status settlement dated to the seventh to the eleventh century. This study presen...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reviews the evidence for consumption and use of birds at Danish Viking Age sites. The presence and diversity of wild and domestic bird species were studied on the basis of the avian material retrieved from sites representing a wide range of different habitats covering a period from the Late Germanic Iron Age to early medieval times (ca 5...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, zooarchaeological evidence from Roman Iron Age (c. 1-375 AD) inhumation graves with focus on the avian remains is presented. The material comprises both old and recently excavated material mainly from wealthy burial sites in eastern Denmark. Birds occur rarely as grave gifts in Danish inhumation graves. In total six graves provided b...
Article
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Article
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A multi-disciplinary study of settlement in north-east Greenland found that life in this High Arctic zone was actually favoured by the climate brought in by the Little Ice Age (fifteenth–nineteenth century). Extensive ice cover meant high mobility, and the rare polynyas — small patches of permanently open coastal water — provided destinations, like...
Article
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The GeoArk project conducted interdisciplinary studies between 2003 and 2008 to investigate the Thule culture (c. 1400 AD until c. 1850 AD) in the Wollaston Forland - Clavering Ø region (74°N). Faunal remains of recent excavations and re-analyses of previous excavations of Thule culture seasonal features, winter houses and middens are presented, wi...
Article
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This article was submitted without an abstract, please refer to the full-text PDF file.
Article
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Rescue excavations in Gdañsk and Ko³obrzeg starting in the early 1990's pro- vided new hand collected bird remains. The present paper deals with the results of bird re- mains analyses of three sites from Gdañsk (12th -18th century) and one site from Ko³obrzeg (10th-12th century). The most frequent bird species was domestic fowl, fol- lowed by goose...
Article
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Goose remains from 16 prehistoric localities ranging from the beginning of the Saqqaq period, c. 2400 B.C., to Colonial times, c. 1850 A.D. were examined in order to elucidate the prehistoric distribution of goose populations in Central West Greenland. The site of Nipisat I, Sisimiut/Holsteinsborg District, dated to c. 2000-500 B.C., provided nearl...
Article
Full-text available
The exploitation of birds, especially sea birds, in Low Arctic Greenland was studied, based on over 80 000 bird bones from 16 coastal Inuit settlements comprising both Palaeoeskimo and Neoeskimo sites. Twenty-seven bird species were identified, with Brünnich's Guillemot (Uria lomvia) as the most frequent game bird on most sites, although gulls, eid...
Article
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Nordvestsjaelland har en usaed-vanlig stor og varieret bestand af fortidsminder. En del af aeren for denne tilstand tilkommer Histo-risk Samfund for Holbaek Amt, som ved sin grundlaeggelse for 100 år siden satte sig som et af sine tre formål "at fremdrage og frede om stedlige Minder". 1 Åmosen (fig. 2) er i denne forbin-delse af saerlig interesse b...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
providing i) novel theoretical approaches to the concept of ‘cultural heritage’ ii) new multi-disciplinary methods to extract information on changing environments and human life conditions from archaeological sites iii) new cultural historical insights through investigations of Inuit and Norse sites in the UNESCO landscapes.