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Anne Elina Flink

Anne Elina Flink

Doctor of Philosophy
Chief Scientist, Viking Expeditions

About

13
Publications
1,310
Reads
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224
Citations
Introduction
Working as Chief Scientist for Viking Expeditions in the Arctic, Antarctica and Great Lakes Multibeam sonar mapping- Glacial geomorphology Baited Remote Underwater Videos- Biology Marine laboratory supervisor Ferrybox- Oceanography Microplastics- Oceanography (FTIR)
Additional affiliations
September 2017 - December 2017
University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS)
Position
  • PostDoc Position
May 2013 - present
University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS)
Position
  • PhD Arctic Marine Geology
May 2013 - May 2017
University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS)
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
September 2011 - June 2012
Stockholm University
Field of study
  • Glaciology, Quaternary Geology

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
The submarine landforms and shallow sediment record are presented from Hambergbukta, southeastern Spitsbergen using swath‐bathymetric, subbottom acoustic, and sediment core data. The mapped landforms include large terminal and end‐moraines with associated debrisflow aprons on their distal flanks, drumlinized till surface, glacial lineations, medial...
Article
New marine-geophysical data were analyzed to investigate the sedimentary processes operating on the continental slope north of Nordaustlandet, Svalbard. Kvitøya Trough terminates in a trough-mouth fan (TMF) on the slope, whereas Albertini Trough incises the shelf edge and a TMF is notably absent. Instead, the continental slope beyond Albertini Trou...
Thesis
Abstract This thesis presents a reconstruction of the late Weichselian, deglacial and Holocene glacial history of the Svalbard fjords, focusing on eastern Svalbard. The study is based on high-resolution multibeam data, shallow acoustic (chirp) data, marine sediment cores, historical maps and aerial- satellite images. During the Last Glacial Maximum...
Article
Submarine geomorphology is one of the main tools for understanding past fluctuations of tidewater glaciers. In this study we investigate the glacial history of Mohnbukta, on the east coast of Spitsbergen, Svalbard, by combining multibeam-bathymetric data, marine sediment cores and remote sensing data. Presently, three tidewater glaciers, Heuglinbre...
Article
Vaigattbogen is located in northern Svalbard. The area is currently affected by several tidewater glaciers. This study uses multibeam-, sub-bottom acoustic data, and four sediment cores to reconstruct the Late Weichselian and Holocene glacial history in Vaigattbogen. During the last glacial, ice flowed northwards through Vaigattbogen and fed into t...
Article
Observations of subglacial landforms yielding the configuration and dynamics of former ice-flows have for the first time been made in Rijpfjorden and Duvefjorden, Nordaustlandet, Svalbard, using sub-bottom acoustic, swath-bathymetric data and sediment cores. Five acoustic-stratigraphic units were distinguished suggesting the presence of a complete...
Article
Wahlenbergfjorden is a fjord situated in the western part of Nordaustlandet in northern Svalbard. It leads into the 400 m deep Hinlopen Strait located between Nordaustlandet and Spitsbergen. High-resolution multibeam bathymetric and sub-bottom data, as well as sediment cores are used to study the past extent and dynamics of glaciers in Wahlenbergfj...
Article
Streamlined sedimentary and bedrock glacial landforms are widespread on high-latitude continental shelves and in fjords. It has been shown that they are orientated in the direction of past ice flow and are indicative of fast motion linked to basal processes (e.g. Clark 1994). Elongation ratios of these landforms have been suggested to reflect past...
Article
The englacial entrainment of basal debris during surges presents an opportunity to investigate processes acting at the glacier bed. The subsequent melt-out of debris-rich englacial structures during the quiescent phase produces geometrical ridge networks on glacier forelands that are diagnostic of surge activity. We investigate the link between deb...
Article
This study focuses on the glacial landform record associated with recent surge events of Tunabreen - a calving tidewater glacier in Tempelfjorden, Spitsbergen. Submarine geomorphology and recent terminal fluctuations of Tunabreen's glacier front were studied using high-resolution multibeam-bathymetric data and a range of published and remote-sensin...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
The overarching scientific goal of the GLANAM network is to determine the controls on the development in time and space of glaciated continental margins with specific reference to the NorthAtlantic. This is broken down into 5 specific objectives: 1. To determine the role of different glacial/non-glacial sedimentary processes in shaping the glaciated North Atlantic margins. 2. To contribute to the understanding of the extent, timing and rates of decay of marine-based ice sheets. 3. To contribute to the understanding of the influence the ice ages have imposed on the hydrocarbonsystems on the glaciated North Atlantic margin including sedimentation rates/location of depo-centres, subsidence/tilting and direct ice loading through multiple glaciations. 4. To determine the influence of climate change and sedimentary processes on the fluid flow (and gas hydrate) systems on the glaciated North Atlantic margin. 5. To identify the controlling factors and the role of submarine mass movements (with resulting tsunamis) on the glaciated North Atlantic margin. Collectively, these five objectives flow into the overall scientific goal of GLANAM: to determine the spatial and temporal controls on the development of glaciated continental margins with specific reference to the North Atlantic. The first objective provides the basis for tackling the others. The second objective will be of special importance for global climate change research and models (i.e. for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change IPCC). The third and fourth objectives are particularly relevant to industry. The fifth, and final objective, is of great societal relevance. From www.glanam.org