Anne Charmantier

Anne Charmantier
French National Centre for Scientific Research | CNRS · Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive (CEFE) UMR 5175

PhD

About

199
Publications
58,392
Reads
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8,167
Citations
Additional affiliations
November 2006 - present
Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
Position
  • Directeur de Recherche

Publications

Publications (199)
Article
Cities pose a major ecological challenge for wildlife worldwide. Phenotypic variation, which can result from underlying genetic variation or plasticity, is an important metric to understand eco‐evolutionary responses to environmental change. Recent work suggests that urban populations might have higher levels of phenotypic variation than non‐urban...
Article
Full-text available
Research on the evolutionary ecology of urban areas reveals how human-induced evolutionary changes affect biodiversity and essential ecosystem services. In a rapidly urbanizing world imposing many selective pressures, a time-sensitive goal is to identify the emergent issues and research priorities that affect the ecology and evolution of species wi...
Preprint
Although the field of urban evolutionary ecology is in its infancy, much progress has been made in identifying adaptations that arise as a result of selective pressures within these unique environments. However, as studies within urban environments have rapidly increased, researchers have recognized there are challenges and opportunities in charact...
Preprint
Changing environmental conditions cause changes in the distributions of phenotypic traits in natural populations. Adaptation to environmental conditions can occur via micro-evolution, and, likely more often, via phenotypic plasticity. Phenotypic plasticity, when heritable, itself also has the potential for a micro-evolutionary response to selection...
Preprint
Understanding the mechanisms by which populations can adapt to changing environmental conditions is crucial for predicting their viability. In the context of rapid climate change, phenological advance is a key adaptation for which evidence is accumulating across taxa. Among vertebrates, phenotypic plasticity is known to underlie most of this phenol...
Preprint
Understanding the mechanisms by which populations can adapt to changing environmental conditions is crucial for predicting their viability. In the context of rapid climate change, phenological advance is a key adaptation for which evidence is accumulating across taxa. Among vertebrates, phenotypic plasticity is known to underlie most of this phenol...
Article
Full-text available
Additive genetic variance in fitness is a prerequisite for adaptive evolution, as a trait must be genetically correlated with fitness to evolve. Despite its relevance, additive genetic variance in fitness has not often been estimated in nature. Here, we investigate additive genetic variance in lifetime and annual fitness components in common terns...
Article
The rate of adaptive evolution, the contribution of selection to genetic changes that increase mean fitness, is determined by the additive genetic variance in individual relative fitness. To date, there are few robust estimates of this parameter for natural populations, and it is therefore unclear whether adaptive evolution can play a meaningful ro...
Article
Full-text available
Life‐history strategies differ with respect to investment in current versus ‘future’ reproduction, but when is this future? Under the novel ‘temporality in reproductive investment hypothesis’, we postulate variation should exist in the time frame over which reproductive costs are paid. Slow‐paced individuals should pay reproductive costs over short...
Article
Full-text available
The phenology of many species shows strong sensitivity to climate change; however, with few large scale intra-specific studies it is unclear how such sensitivity varies over a species’ range. We document large intra-specific variation in phenological sensitivity to temperature using laying date information from 67 populations of two co-familial Eur...
Article
Climate change has been shown to affect fitness-related traits in a wide range of taxa; for instance, warming leads to phenological advancements in many plant and animal species. The influence of climate change on social and secondary sexual traits, that are associated with fitness due to their role as quality signals, is however unknown. Here, we...
Article
Full-text available
Predicting the impacts of changing environments on phenotypes in wild populations remains a challenge. Growth, a trait that frequently influences fitness, is difficult to study as it is influenced by many environmental variables. To address this, we used a sliding window approach to determine the time windows when sea-surface and air temperatures h...
Article
Full-text available
Identifying the molecular mechanisms involved in rapid adaptation to novel environments and determining their predictability, are central questions in evolutionary biology and pressing issues due to rapid global changes. Complementary to genetic responses to selection, faster epigenetic variations such as modifications of DNA methylation may play a...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing awareness that parasitism is an essential component of nearly all aspects of ecosystem functioning, as well as a driver of biodiversity, has led to rising interest in the consequences of climate change in terms of parasitism and disease spread. Yet empirical knowledge on the extent and ways in which climatic factors affect parasite preva...
Article
Full-text available
In a context of rapid climate change, the influence of large-scale and local climate on population demography is increasingly scrutinized, yet studies are usually focused on one population. Demographic parameters, including survival, can vary significantly across populations of a given species, depending on global or local climatic fluctuations but...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanization is a worldwide phenomenon associated with tremendous modifications of natural habitats. Understanding how city dwelling species are affected by those changes is becoming a pressing issue. We presently lack fine scale spatio-temporal studies investigating the impact of urbanization across different life stages and along urbanization gra...
Article
In the past decade, numerous studies have explored how urbanisation affects the mean phenotypes of populations, but it remains unknown how urbanisation impacts phenotypic variation, a key target of selection that shapes, and is shaped by, eco-evolutionary processes. Our review suggests that urbanisation may often increase intraspecific phenotypic v...
Preprint
Full-text available
Cities pose a major ecological challenge for wildlife worldwide. Phenotypic variation is a pivotal metric to predict evolutionary potential in response to environmental change. Recent work suggests that urban populations might have higher levels of phenotypic variation than non-urban counterparts. This prediction, however, has never been tested acr...
Preprint
Additive genetic variance in fitness equals the change in mean fitness due to selection. It is a prerequisite for adaptation, as a trait must be genetically correlated with fitness in order to evolve. Despite its relevance, additive genetic variance in fitness has not often been estimated in wild populations. Here, we investigate additive genetic v...
Data
Example of a great tit nest of which a nest cup has been built on top of a thick layer of pine needles. This nest type illustrates that the nest cup and its components mainly contribute to the protection of eggs and nestlings. Experiments of which boxes are filled up with a pine needles could be used to facilitate the study of the biological conseq...
Article
Full-text available
Trophic networks are composed of many organisms hosting microbiota that interact with their hosts and with each other. Yet, our knowledge of the factors driving variation in microbiota and their interactions in wild communities is limited. To investigate the relation among host microbiota across a trophic network, we studied the bacterial microbiot...
Preprint
Full-text available
Identifying the molecular mechanisms involved in rapid adaptation to novel environments and determining their predictability are central questions in Evolutionary Biology and pressing issues due to rapid global changes. Complementary to genetic responses to selection, faster epigenetic variations such as modifications of DNA methylation may play a...
Preprint
Full-text available
In a context of rapid climate change, the influence of large-scale and local climate on population demography is increasingly scrutinized, yet studies are usually focused on one population. Demographic parameters, including survival, can vary significantly across populations of a given species, depending on global or local climatic fluctuations but...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is forecasted to generate a range of evolutionary changes and plastic responses. One important aspect of avian responses to climate change is how weather conditions may change nestling growth and development. Early life growth is sensitive to environmental effects and can potentially have long-lasting effects on adult phenotypes and...
Preprint
Full-text available
Although it has been shown that phenology can respond to temporal environmental variation in free ranging populations of several species, little is known about the mechanisms of these responses and their effects on demography, and in particular on survival. Exploring phenological responses and their associated consequences on survival can be achiev...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Many ecological and evolutionary processes strongly depend on the way natural selection varies over time. However, a gap remains when trying to connect theoretical predictions to empirical work on this question: Most theory assumes that adaptation involves tracking a moving optimum phenotype through time, but this is seldom estimated e...
Article
Full-text available
1. The integration and synthesis of the data in different areas of science is drastically slowed and hindered by a lack of standards and networking programmes. Long‐term studies of individually marked animals are not an exception. These studies are especially important as instrumental for understanding evolutionary and ecological processes in the w...
Article
Phenological traits, such as the timing of reproduction, are often influenced by social interactions between paired individuals. Such partner effects may occur when pair members affect each other’s pre-breeding environment. Partner effects can be environmentally and/or genetically determined, and quantifying direct and indirect genetic effects is i...
Article
Full-text available
Life-history traits are often plastic in response to environmental factors such as temperature or precipitation, and they also vary with age in many species. Trait variation during the lifetime could thus be partly driven by age-dependent plasticity in these traits. We study whether plasticity of a phenological trait - the egg-laying date - with re...
Preprint
Full-text available
The phenology of many species shows strong sensitivity to climate change; however, with few large scale intra-specific studies it is unclear how such sensitivity varies over a species' range. We document large intra-specific variation in phenological sensitivity to temperature using laying date information from 67 populations of two European songbi...
Preprint
Full-text available
The integration and synthesis of the data in different areas of science is drastically slowed and hindered by a lack of standards and networking programmes. Long-term studies of individually marked animals are not an exception. These studies are especially important as instrumental for understanding evolutionary and ecological processes in the wild...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the genomic processes underlying local adaptation is a central aim of modern evolutionary biology. This task requires identifying footprints of local selection but also estimating spatio‐temporal variation in population demography and variation in recombination rate and diversity along the genome. Here, we investigated these parameter...
Article
Full-text available
Temperature is one of the best investigated environmental factors in ecological life-history studies and is increasingly considered in the contexts of climate change and urbanization. In avian ecology, few studies have examined the associations between thermal dynamics in the nest environment and its neighbouring air. Here, we placed avian nests an...
Article
We report on the first meeting of SMBE in Africa. SMBE Malawi was initiated to bring together African and international researchers who use genetics or genomics to study natural systems impacted by human activities. The goals of this conference were (1) to reach a world class standard of science with a large number of contributions from within Afri...
Chapter
The field of urban ecology has provided many fascinating examples of organisms that display novel biological features in urban environments compared to natural habitats. Quantitative genetics provides a framework that can be used to investigate whether this phenotypic differentiation between urban and natural habitats is adaptive and is the result...
Chapter
Cities occupy about 3 per cent of the Earth’s habitable land area and are home to one out of two humans worldwide; both estimates are predicted to grow. Urban space is thus becoming an important, novel ecological niche for humans and wildlife alike. Building on knowledge gathered by urban ecologists during the last half century, evidence of evoluti...
Data
This file contains data from a brood size experiment which is used in a manuscript entitled "Are urban great tits rearing too many nestlings? A brood size reduction experiment', by Demeyrier V, Lambrechts M, Perret S, Charmantier A & Grégoire A
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding the genomic processes underlying local adaptation is a central aim of modern evolutionary biology. This task requires identifying footprints of local selection but also estimating spatio-temporal variation of populations demography and variation in recombination rate and diversity along the genome. Here, we investigated these paramete...
Article
Full-text available
Biological responses to climate change have been widely documented across taxa and regions, but it remains unclear whether species are maintaining a good match between phenotype and environment, i.e. whether observed trait changes are adaptive. Here we reviewed 10,090 abstracts and extracted data from 71 studies reported in 58 relevant publications...
Chapter
There is now overwhelming evidence that the recent rapid climate change has multiple consequences for birds: their abilities to adapt to climate change is thus a major issue. To understand the evolutionary consequences of climate change, an assessment of how it alters selection pressures is needed. As expected, climate change increases selection fo...
Article
Full-text available
Long-term field studies coupled with quantitative genomics offer a powerful means to understand the genetic bases underlying quantitative traits and their evolutionary changes. However, analyzing and interpreting the time scales at which adaptive evolution occurs is challenging. First, while evolution is predictable in the short term, with striking...
Article
Full-text available
In an ideal world, funding agencies could identify the best scientists and projects and provide them with the resources to undertake these projects. Most scientists would agree that in practice, how funding for scientific research is allocated is far from ideal and likely compromises research quality. We, nine evolutionary biologists from different...
Preprint
Full-text available
Increasing awareness that parasitism is an essential component of nearly all aspects of ecosystem functioning, as well as a driver of biodiversity, has led to rising interest in the consequences of climate change in terms of parasitism and disease spread. Yet empirical knowledge on the extent and ways in which climatic factors affect parasite preva...
Preprint
Full-text available
A major aim of evolutionary biology is to understand why patterns of genomic variation vary among populations and species. Large-scale genomic studies of widespread species are useful for studying how the environment and demographic history shape patterns of genomic divergence, and with the continually decreasing cost of sequencing, such studies ar...
Article
Full-text available
Phenotypic plasticity is a major mechanism of response to global change. However, current plastic responses will only remain adaptive under future conditions if informative environmental cues are still available. We briefly summarize current knowledge of the evolutionary origin and mechanistic underpinnings of environmental cues for phenotypic plas...
Preprint
Full-text available
Long-term field studies coupled with quantitative genomics offer a powerful means to understand the genetic bases underlying quantitative traits and their evolutionary changes. However, analyzing and interpreting the time scales at which adaptive evolution occurs is challenging. First, while evolution is predictable in the short term, with striking...
Preprint
Full-text available
Long-term field studies coupled with quantitative genomics offer a powerful means to understand the genetic bases underlying quantitative traits and their evolutionary changes. However, analyzing and interpreting the time scales at which adaptive evolution occurs is challenging. First, while evolution is predictable in the short term, with striking...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing urbanization offers a unique opportunity to study adaptive responses to rapid environmental change. Numerous studies have demonstrated phenotypic divergence between urban and rural organisms. However, comparing the direction and magnitude of natural selection between these environments has rarely been attempted. Using seven years of moni...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanization is a growing concern challenging the evolutionary potential of wild populations by reducing genetic diversity and imposing new selection regimes affecting many key fitness traits. However, genomic footprints of urbanization have received little attention so far. Using RAD sequencing, we investigated the genome-wide effects of urbanizat...
Article
Understanding the causes and consequences of population phenotypic divergence is a central goal in ecology and evolution. Phenotypic divergence among populations can result from genetic divergence, phenotypic plasticity or a combination of the two. However, few studies have deciphered these mechanisms for populations geographically close and connec...
Article
Full-text available
Genomic developments have empowered the investigation of heritability in wild populations directly from genomewide relatedness matrices (GRM). Such GRM-based approaches can in particular be used to improve or substitute approaches based on social pedigree (PED-social). However, measuring heritability from GRM in the wild has not been widely applied...
Article
Full-text available
Although there are many examples of contemporary directional selection, evidence for responses to selection that match predictions are often missing in quantitative genetic studies of wild populations. This is despite the presence of genetic variation and selection pressures - theoretical prerequisites for the response to selection. This conundrum...
Article
Behavioural ecologists have for decades investigated the adaptive value of extra‐pair copulation (EPC) for females of socially monogamous species. Despite extensive effort testing for genetic benefits, there now seems to be a consensus that the so‐called ‘good genes’ effects are at most weak. In parallel the search for direct benefits has mostly fo...
Article
Full-text available
Evolutionary adaptation as a response to climate change is expected for fitness-related traits affected by climate and exhibiting genetic variance. Although the relationship between warmer spring temperature and earlier timing of reproduction is well documented, quantifications and predictions of the impact of global warming on natural selection ac...
Article
Full-text available
Investigations of urbanization effects on birds have focused mainly on breeding traits expressed after the nest-building stage (e.g. first-egg date, clutch size, breeding success, and offspring characteristics). Urban studies largely ignored how and why the aspects of nest building might be associated with the degree of urbanization. As urban envir...