Annalise Roache

Annalise Roache
Auckland University of Technology | AUT · Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences

Doctoral Candidate - Doctor of Philosophy

About

7
Publications
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Introduction
Annalise Roache is a PhD candidate at Auckland University of Technology and works as a Positive Psychology Practitioner in her business The Coaching Toolbox (www.annaliseroache.com). Annalise's research interests are Positive Psychology and wellbeing studies, especially the relationship between theory and practice. Her PhD topic explores Lay conceptions and Lay Theories of Wellbeing. She holds a Master of Science (Positive Psychology & Coaching Psychology) from The University of East London.

Publications

Publications (7)
Article
Full-text available
در حالی که پیچیدگی‌های زندگی معاصر آسیب‌پذیری انسان را تشدید کرده است، در عرضۀ خدمات روان‌شناختی، اولویت‌های متعارض و معضلات اخلاقی در مرکز توجه هستند. هیچ مجموعۀ واحدی وجود ندارد که بتواند راهنماهای اخلاقی یا استانداردهای کاملی را برای گسترۀ پیچیدگی‌های انسان دربرگیرد. بااین‌حال، مجموعه‌ای از ارزش‌های فراگیر و اصول، ما را به‌سوی تصمیم‌گیری‌های اخل...
Article
Full-text available
As positive psychology has developed as a field, questions have arisen around how to ensure best practice, including with respect to ethics. This issue is particularly pertinent vis-à-vis its applied dimensions, such as positive psychology interventions by students and graduates of MAPP programmes. However, the field has hitherto lacked clear ethic...
Article
Full-text available
These guidelines are the result of a collaborative and independent working group led by Aaron Jarden, Tayyab Rashid, Annalise Roache and Tim Lomas. The guidelines are independent of any organisation or association; however, numerous parties have been involved in the development and refinement of this first iteration. It is the authors’ intention to...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I have 6 cohorts (Three time points) and currently a follow up (Time 3) response rate of about 75%. The breakdown of numbers is closely linked to the number of participants in each group at Time 1 and 2 - although the control group has a higher rate at Time 3. I am looking for research/guidance to confirm if this is an acceptable level and so far I can only find articles about medical research stating 60-80% is considered acceptable. Any thoughts welcomed and appreciated! Thank you.

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Projects

Projects (6)
Project
Version two sees continued work on the Ethical Guidelines for Positive Psychology Practice, and after comprehensive community feedback and input, we are excited to offer this new iteration. Iteration two contains several fundamental changes, which are both structural and content related. Firstly, we developed and amended many aspects of the content with a particular focus on expanding and refining the language used to ensure that the guidelines, and the practitioners using them, are taking into consideration the needs of different populations (e.g., age, gender, sexuality and gender identity, neurodiversity), cultural awareness and diverse applications of positive psychology. Ethical perfection may be a utopian ideal, since human beings, including positive psychology practitioners (PPPs), are fallible, vulnerable, and imperfect. Moreover, the complexities of contemporary life-including ever-expanding cyber-living, erratic climate change, global pandemics, refugee crises, evolving identities, and increasing economic polarisation - exacerbate such human vulnerabilities. Psychological services, especially explicitly aiming to restore or enhance wellbeing, are not easily offered without competing priorities and ethical dilemmas. No single set of ethical guidelines, standards, codes or even statutes can fully encapsulate the range of human complexities. Nevertheless, we believe that a broad framework of values, personal strengths, and principles, nonetheless can yet guide us to more and better ethical decision making. This principle applies in all domains of endeavour, not least – most relevantly here – in engaging in positive psychological interventions (PPIs), which inherently aim to enhance wellbeing.
Project
Clarify the term wellbeing. We are editing a special issue on the topic “What is Wellbeing?” in the journal IJERPH (ISSN 1660-4601, IF 4.614, http://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph). We see conceptualizing and clearly defining wellbeing as an essential first step in the successful development of any wellbeing theory, policy, or intervention, and at the base of any scientific attempt to measure or improve wellbeing. As such, we see that a comprehensive and socially relevant research approach needs to be established to better understand what wellbeing is, how it is defined and conceptualized, and what it means to people. Therefore, we cordially invite papers for this Special Issue addressing these issues and topics, especially those combining a high academic standard coupled with a practical focus on wellbeing. New research papers, reviews, and case reports are welcome to this issue. Papers dealing with new approaches to understanding wellbeing per se are especially welcome. Other manuscript types accepted include methodological papers, position papers, brief reports, and commentaries. As an interdisciplinary effort, we will accept manuscripts from different disciplines across the sciences. More information on the Special Issue can be found at the website: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph/special_issues/whatis_wellbeing If you are interested in contributing a paper, please let us know as soon as possible. In addition, we would appreciate a tentative title and short abstract. COntact Email Aaron Jarden aaron.jarden@unimelb.edu.au