Anna Wessman

Anna Wessman
University of Bergen | UiB ·  University Museum of Bergen

Professor

About

37
Publications
18,123
Reads
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394
Citations
Introduction
Prof. Anna Wessman has a PhD in Archaeology from the University of Helsinki, Finland (2010). After her thesis she was the PI in the multidisciplinary project about the Levänluhta water burial (2010-2015) financed by the Emil Aaltonen Foundation. She has worked extensively with avocational metal-detectorists in Scandinavia. Currently she is working at the University Museum of Bergen in Norway. She is also Adjunct Professor in Iron Age studies at the University of Turku, Finland.
Additional affiliations
November 2018 - June 2019
University of Helsinki
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
Full-text available
This article introduces the first of what will ultimately be two collections of case studies in archaeologist–responsible/responsive artifact collector collaboration. Focused on the United States, the articles in this issue of Advances in Archaeological Practice share the thoughts and experiences of archaeologists representing diverse employment se...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter discusses the different motives for displaying the dead in museum exhibitions relating to Finnish prehistory. While the act of excavating, storing and displaying human remains can evoke feelings, especially in other countries with larger indigenous populations such as the United States, Canada, New Zealand and Australia, an ethical deb...
Book
Full-text available
This book is a handbook for everyone who is interested in museums and the wider cultural and cultural heritage debates. In the spirit of lifelong learning, it aims to connect the humanistic discipline of museum studies with the wider context of society. Museums possess power as safekeepers of our memories. This book will, in its own small way, take...
Article
Full-text available
FindSampo fosters collecting, sharing, publishing and studying archaeological finds discovered by the public. The framework includes the following: a mobile find-reporting system; a semantic portal for researchers, the public and collection managers to use; and a Linked Open Data service for creating custom data analyses and for application develop...
Article
Full-text available
Levänluhta, an Iron Age water burial site in Finland, and its material consisting of commingled skeletal remains and artefacts, has been studied by several researchers over the past 100 years, resulting in multiple interpretations of the people and the site. Previous skeletal analyses have concluded the majority of the individuals represented in th...
Article
Full-text available
In autumn 2018, eight Museum Studies students from the University of Helsinki had the opportunity to put theory into practice and to gain hands-on experience making a real exhibition. The ‘Museum Content Planning’ course was a collaborative project between the National Museum of Finland and the university in which the students, together with the mu...
Article
Full-text available
Levänluhta is a unique archaeological site with the remains of nearly a hundred Iron Age individuals found from a water burial in Ostrobothnia, Finland. The strongest climatic downturn of the Common Era, resembling the great Fimbulvinter in Norse mythology, hit these people during the 6th century AD. This study establishes chronological, dietary, a...
Article
Hobby metal detecting is a controversial subject. Legal and policy approaches differ widely across national and regional contexts, and the attitudes of archaeologists and heritage professionals towards detectorists are often polarized and based on ethical or emotive arguments. We, the European Public Finds Recording Network (EPFRN), have implemente...
Article
Full-text available
Human ancient DNA studies have revealed high mobility in Europe’s past, and have helped to decode the human history on the Eurasian continent. Northeastern Europe, especially north of the Baltic Sea, however, remains less well understood largely due to the lack of preserved human remains. Finland, with a divergent population history from most of Eu...
Article
Full-text available
Metal-detecting in Finland is growing in popularity, and with responsible metal detectorists wishing to report their finds to the authorities, so also grows the pressure on the heritage sector to respond. But recording finds made by metal-detectorists is not merely a matter of providing a service to a certain group of enthusiasts; research in Finla...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents the results of the first-ever lead isotope (LI) analysis of copper-based archaeological artefacts found in the region of Finland. Eight metal objects recovered from the Iron Age water burial site of Levänluhta in western Finland were analysed via multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS)and porta...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents the results of the first-ever lead isotope (LI) analysis of copper-based archaeological artefacts found in the region of Finland. Eight metal objects recovered from the Iron Age water burial site of Levänluhta in western Finland were analysed via multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) and port...
Chapter
Metal detecting has become a vivid area of citizen science. In many countries where metal detecting is legal, the rapidly increasing number of finds submitted to authorities managing national archaeological databases has overwhelmed the capabilities of those maintaining the records. We propose an innovative approach for solving the problem by prese...
Article
Full-text available
Northeastern Siberia has been inhabited by humans for more than 40,000 years but its deep population history remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the late Pleistocene population history of northeastern Siberia through analyses of 34 newly recovered ancient genomes that date to between 31,000 and 600 years ago. We document complex populati...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this paper, we present an ongoing project called Finnish Archaeological Finds Recording Linked Open Database (Suomen arke-ologisten löytöjen linkitetty avoin tietokanta-SuALT), including the reasons why this citizen science project is underway. SuALT will be a digital web service catering for discoveries of archaeological material made by the pu...
Article
Full-text available
European population history has been shaped by migrations of people, and their subsequent admixture. Recently, ancient DNA has brought new insights into European migration events linked to the advent of agriculture, and possibly to the spread of Indo-European languages. However, little is known about the ancient population history of north-eastern...
Preprint
Full-text available
Far northeastern Siberia has been occupied by humans for more than 40 thousand years. Yet, owing to a scarcity of early archaeological sites and human remains, its population history and relationship to ancient and modern populations across Eurasia and the Americas are poorly understood. Here, we report 34 ancient genome sequences, including two fr...
Article
Full-text available
The University of Helsinki has made significant changes to its educational frameworks and degree programmes. For museum studies the changes have been particularly far-reaching. From autumn 2017 onwards there has been a reduction in the total number of study credits available, but also a move from bachelors- to masters-level teaching. This upheaval...
Preprint
Full-text available
European history has been shaped by migrations of people, and their subsequent admixture. Recently, evidence from ancient DNA has brought new insights into migration events that could be linked to the advent of agriculture, and possibly to the spread of Indo-European languages. However, little is known so far about the ancient population history of...
Article
The wetland find in Levänluhta (western Finland) consists of unburnt, mixed up remains from almost 100 human individuals along with artefacts and animal bones. This spring site, a small lake at the time of use ( ad 300–800), has been investigated archaeologically from the late nineteenth century onwards. An impressive array of finds, including prec...
Article
Full-text available
This outline article presents and critiques legislation as it affects the metal detecting hobby and the archaeological profession. It considers some of the ways in which metal detectorists themselves have caused controversy but also positive news in relation to archaeological heritage in Finland. A selection of examples of collaboration based on th...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Levänluhta in southern Ostrobothnia is one of the most famous archaeological sites in Finland (Wessman 2009). This water burial contains bone remains of 100 human individuals together with artifacts and animal bones. According to archaeological data, the burial is dated to 4th-8th centuries AD. Therefore, the period of usage possibly coincides with...
Article
Full-text available
The thesis is connected with death, memory and ancestor commemoration during the Merovingian Period, the Viking Age and the beginning of the Crusade Period (AD 550-1150) in Finland. During this time, cremation was the dominant burial rite. It was not until the end of the Viking Age that inhumation became more common but both cremations and inhumati...
Article
Full-text available
This article discusses the Finnish hiisi sites which were listed in the 1967 doctoral thesis of the linguist Mauno Koski. Based on place names, Koski associated 14 Iron Age cemeteries with hiisi sites. Cup-marked stones, sacred trees and springs which have been found in the vicinity of these hiisi sites also seem to imply a connection between cemet...

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Projects (4)