Anna J. Waterman

Anna J. Waterman
Mount Mercy University · Department of Natural and Applied Sciences

Ph.D.

About

32
Publications
14,042
Reads
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753
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2012 - present
Mount Mercy University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Education
September 2004 - May 2012
University of Iowa
Field of study
  • Biological Anthropology

Publications

Publications (32)
Preprint
Full-text available
This study provides evidence of the value of using isotopic data from faunal remains to understand human diet and mobility patterns when human remains are not available for examination. In this research, bone apatite, bone collagen, and enamel apatite from fauna recovered from recent excavations of the Dixon site (13WD8), an Oneota complex site (AD...
Article
Full-text available
We assembled genome-wide data from 271 ancient Iberians, of whom 176 are from the largely unsampled period after 2000 BCE, thereby providing a high-resolution time transect of the Iberian Peninsula.We document high genetic substructure between northwestern and southeastern hunter-gatherers before the spread of farming.We reveal sporadic contacts be...
Article
Full-text available
The fortified site of Los Millares in southeastern Spain is one of the best-known Copper Age sites in southern Europe and has been studied extensively, improving our understanding of the development of political centralization and social stratification during the 3rd millennium BC in the Iberian Peninsula. One unique feature of Los Millares is its...
Article
Full-text available
Agriculture frst reached the Iberian Peninsula around 5700 BCE. However, little is known about the genetic structure and changes of prehistoric populations in diferent geographic areas of Iberia. In our study, we focus on the maternal genetic makeup of the Neolithic (~ 5500–3000 BCE), Chalcolithic (~ 3000–2200 BCE) and Early Bronze Age (~ 2200–1500...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines strontium, oxygen, and carbon isotope ratios (⁸⁷Sr/⁸⁶Sr, δ¹⁸O, δ¹³C) in dental enamel and bone apatite from 82 individuals interred at Late Neolithic, Chalcolithic, and Bronze Age burial sites near Madrid, Spain, to discern variations in dietary patterns and identify possible migrants. Questions about mobility patterns and subsi...
Article
Full-text available
El Rebollosillo es una pequeña cueva kárstica situada en el centro de la Península Ibérica utilizada para la disposición de enterramientos secundarios en la mitad del III milenio AC. Presentamos resultados bioantropológicos, isotópicos (87Sr/86Sr, δ13C y δ18O) y 16 dataciones radiocarbónicas de los restos humanos, una descripción cuantificada de lo...
Article
The relationship between the development of social complexity in the Iberian Peninsula during the 4th and 3rd millennia BCE (Late Neolithic and Copper Age) and population movement has been a longstanding question. Biological affinity analyses were used to explore Iberian demographic dynamics, and specifically, to discern whether there is evidence f...
Article
To better understand the sociopolitical landscape of the Portuguese Estremadura during the Late Neolithic/Copper Age, interdisciplinary excavations were conducted at Bolores (Torres Vedras), in the Sizandro River Valley. Following a test season in 1986, a University of Iowa team conducted four campaigns between 2007 and 2012. Bolores is a rock-cut...
Article
In the Neolithic and Copper Age collective burials of the Portuguese Estremadura, the majority of material culture and skeletal remains are highly commingled, making it difficult for archaeologists to evaluate social status by linking individuals with specific grave goods. In these circumstances, bio-anthropological data about individual life histo...
Article
The rock-cut tomb of Bolores in the Portuguese Estremadura, dates primarily to the Late Neolithic/Copper Age (2800-2600 BC), and in a series of recent excavations has yielded thousands of fragmented, commingled human bone specimens. The primary goals of the present study were to determine the minimum number of individuals (MNI) interred in the tomb...
Article
This paper details the results of a comparison of stable isotopic data from bone samples acquired from 31 individuals from two Late Neolithic-Copper Age (3500-2000 BC) burial sites in the Estremadura region of Portugal. The chosen sites of Feteira II and Paimogo I are geographically close and temporally overlapping but represent distinctive types o...
Article
This paper details the results of a comparison of stable isotopic data from bone samples acquired from 31 individuals from two Late Neolithic-Copper Age (3500-2000 BC) burial sites in the Estremadura region of Portugal. The chosen sites of Feteira II and Paimogo I are geographically close and temporally overlapping but represent distinctive types o...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
ln this paper, human skeletal remains from two prominent settlement sites in the Estremadura region of Portugal (Leceia and Zambujal) were examined in order to investigate how settlement burials may relate to individual identity, and/or temporal and spatial aspects of community life. Our findings have been that, at both Zambujal and Leceia, the con...
Article
Towards the end of the fifth millennium BC, a new funerary tradition developed in Iberia and elsewhere in Atlantic Europe involving the use of megalithic tombs and natural or artificially constructed caves for the collective burial of the dead. Ancestor worship has been the most common theoretical framework used to explain this Neolithic burial tra...
Article
The Late Neolithic-Early Bronze Age mortuary rockshelter of Bolores (Torres Vedras, Lisbon) is a collective burial located in the archaeologically rich landscape of the Portuguese Estremadura. Excavations were conducted in 2007 and 2008 as part of the Sizandro-Alcabrichel Research Project (SARP), a collaboration between the German Archaeological In...

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