Anna Christina Tyler

Anna Christina Tyler
Rochester Institute of Technology | RIT · Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences

Ph.D.

About

45
Publications
4,890
Reads
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1,540
Citations
Citations since 2017
19 Research Items
535 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
Introduction
Christy Tyler currently works at the Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology. Christy does research in Aquatic Ecology. Her most recent publication is 'Phenolic content of invasive and non-invasive emergent wetland plants.'
Additional affiliations
July 2014 - present
Rochester Institute of Technology
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
August 2009 - July 2014
Rochester Institute of Technology
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
June 2002 - August 2006
University of California, Davis
Education
August 1997 - May 2002
University of Virginia
Field of study
  • Environmental Science

Publications

Publications (45)
Article
Proliferation of macroalgal blooms is regulated by grazing pressure and nutrient availability, which may be mediated directly by benthic macroinvertebrates or indirectly through feedback mechanisms. Using invertebrates common to a shallow estuary in Cape Cod, Massachusetts (USA), we determined effects of faunal diversity on benthic microalgae, net...
Article
Excess nutrient loading and large-scale invasion by nonnatives are two of the most pervasive and damaging threats to the biotic and economic integrity of our estuaries. Individually, these are potent forces, but it is important to consider their interactive impacts as well. In this study we investigated the potential limitation of a nonnative inter...
Article
Full-text available
The widespread use of plastics has led to their increasing presence in the environment and subsequent pollution. Some microorganisms degrade plastics in natural ecosystems and the associated metabolic pathways can be studied to understand the degradation mechanisms. Polystyrene (PS) is one of the more recalcitrant plastic polymers that is degraded...
Article
Studies in the oceans and The Great Lakes have found several orders of magnitude less plastic in surface samples than predicted by input estimates. Some plastic likely sinks after entering the water because it is naturally more dense than freshwater. For less dense particles, it has been proposed that biofouling, or the buildup of organic materials...
Presentation
Full-text available
Presentation given on 1/3rd of my Thesis at the Joint Aquatic Sciences Meeting in Michigan 2022
Poster
Full-text available
Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation Annual conference 2021
Article
Anaerobic co-digestion of food waste and manure is an increasingly common waste management strategy. However, the current disposal alternatives for its resulting effluent, “digestate”, can lead to nutrient run-off and cause surface and groundwater contamination. Biochar made from the solid fraction of digestate was used to recover nutrients present...
Article
Full-text available
Wetland ecosystems play a significant role in the global carbon cycle, and yet are increasingly threatened by human development and climate change. The continued loss of intact freshwater wetlands heightens the need for effective wetland creation and restoration. However, wetland structure and function are controlled by interacting abiotic and biot...
Article
Full-text available
Destruction of natural wetlands has warranted the creation of wetlands to mitigate the reduction of valuable ecosystem functions and services. However, the complex interactions among key drivers of wetland community structure–hydrology, nutrient availability and herbivory-makes creation of functional wetland replacements challenging. We examined in...
Article
Full-text available
Change in the coastal zone is accelerating with external forcing by sea-level rise, nutrient loading, drought, and over-harvest, leading to significant stress on the foundation plant species of coastal salt marshes. The rapid evolution of marsh state induced by these drivers makes the ability to detect stressors prior to marsh loss important. Howev...
Article
Advances in electronic technologies have the potential to enable energy efficiency and climate mitigation but may also create climate impacts due to resource and energy use across the product life cycle. These tradeoffs revolve around the way electronics are designed, manufactured, purchased, used, and disposed and the ability to shift these system...
Preprint
Destruction of natural wetlands has warranted the creation of wetlands to mitigate the reduction of valuable ecosystem functions and services. However, the complex interactions between key drivers of wetland community structure - hydrology, nutrient availability and herbivory - makes creation of functional wetland replacements challenging. We exami...
Article
Full-text available
This work describes a study using multi-view hyperspectral imagery to retrieve sediment filling factor through inversion of a modified version of the Hapke radiative transfer model. We collected multi-view hyperspectral imagery from a hyperspectral imaging system mounted atop a telescopic mast from multiple locations and viewing angles of a salt pa...
Article
Novel engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are increasingly being manufactured and integrated into renewable energy generation and storage technologies. Past research estimated the potential impact of this increased demand on environmental systems, due to both the life cycle impact of ENM production and the potential for their direct release into ecosys...
Article
Full-text available
Salt marsh vegetation density varies considerably on short spatial scales, complicating attempts to evaluate plant characteristics using airborne remote sensing approaches. In this study, we used a mast-mounted hyperspectral imaging system to obtain cm-scale imagery of a salt marsh chronosequence on Hog Island, VA, where the morphology and biomass...
Article
Carbonaceous nanomaterials, such as fullerenes (C60, C70) and their derivative phenyl‐C61‐butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), have promising application in solar energy technologies. While the acute ecotoxicity of C60 has been reported widely in the literature, ecotoxicity assays for different fullerene forms and broader ecosystem impact studies rema...
Article
Production of engineered carbon-based nanomaterials (CNMs) is rising, with increased risk of release to the environment during production, use, and disposal. This trend highlights a need to understand potential impacts of CNMs on the natural environment. Fullerenes are an emerging class of CNMs that are insoluble in water, and form aggregates that...
Article
The leaf area index (LAI) is a structural parameter that plays a major role in modeling the exchange of energy, carbon dioxide, water, and other matter between plants and their surrounding environment. Direct means of measuring LAI are time-intensive and laborious, making indirect LAI retrieval methods desirable. In this study, we developed a metho...
Article
Full-text available
Stormwater retention ponds manage runoff in developed areas, reducing flooding and erosion, and improving downstream water quality. Urban ponds also serve as habitat for aquatic organisms in an otherwise terrestrial habitat. However, the relationship between common pond species and biogeochemical function of ponds is poorly understood. Using a micr...
Article
Secondary chemical production is a potential mechanism of invasive plant success, but little is known about the prevalence of these compounds in wetland species. High concentrations of phenolic compounds, with their diverse functionality, may confer an advantage to plants in response to environmental conditions. We surveyed 19 plant species from te...
Article
Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a complex mixture of soluble organic compounds that plays important roles in stream ecosystem function. We examined temporal and spatial variation in stream DOM characteristics in the small watersheds draining into Conesus Lake, New York, USA. While all watersheds were impacted by human activity, our study sites sp...
Article
In this study, we present data to support the hypothesis that removal of epiphytes by grazers is an important control of nitrogen fixation in temperate seagrass meadows during the summer. Previous work in West Falmouth Harbor, Massachusetts, USA, found highest rates of epiphytic nitrogen fixation in the part of the harbor (Snug Harbor) with the gre...
Article
This article describes how biological ecology models are adapted to analyze the dynamic structure and function of a consumer electronic product “community.” Treating an entire group of interdependent and continually evolving electronic devices as an ecological community provides a basis for more comprehensive analyses of the energy, material, and w...
Article
Benthic invertebrates alter estuarine ecosystem function by moderating benthic microalgal production and sediment biogeochemistry. While lethal predation eliminates the effect of invertebrates, non-consumptive effects of predation through trait-mediated indirect effects on behavior may reduce prey control of ecosystem function. Using microcosms, we...
Chapter
Full-text available
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Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Increases in the frequency and severity of disturbance events, such as periodic hypoxia and sediment resuspension by trawling, have lead to dramatic changes in benthic invertebrate communities in many coastal regions. In order to predict the effects of disturbance on ecosystem function, it is necessary to improve our und...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Plant introductions in estuarine systems can produce substantial changes ranging from species replacement to broad-scale alteration of ecosystem properties. Here we examine the changes produced by the invasion of Atlantic smooth cordgrass Spartina alterniflora in two Pacific estuaries, San Francisco Bay, CA and Willapa...
Article
Macroalgae, often the dominant primary producers in shallow estuaries, can be important regulators of nitrogen (N) cycling. Like phytoplankton, actively growing macroalgae release N to the water column; yet little is known about the quantity or nature of this release. Using 15N labeling in laboratory and field experiments, we estimated the quantity...
Article
Full-text available
We determined the distribution of macroalgae in Hog Island Bay, a shallow coastal lagoon in Virginia, USA, seasonally at 12 sites from 1998 to 2000 and at 3 representative sites from 2000 to 2002. We analyzed macroalgal biomass, taxonomic richness, and abundance of two non-native species, the cryptic invaderGracilaria vermiculophylla and the conspi...
Article
Full-text available
Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) makes up a large fraction of the total dissolved nitrogen pool in coastal waters, but is often ignored as a potential nitrogen source for primary producers. In laboratory experiments, we measured the uptake of small, labile DON compounds, urea and a variety of different amino acids, by the common estuarine macroalga...
Article
Coastal lagoons are a common land-margin feature worldwide and function as an important filter for nutrients entering from the watershed. The shallow nature of lagoons leads to dominance by benthic autotrophs, which can regulate benthic-pelagic coupling. Here we demonstrate that both microalgae and macroalgae are important in controlling dissolved...
Article
Full-text available
Nitrogen (N) limitation of primary production is common in temperate salt marshes, even though conservative N recycling can fulfill a large proportion of plant N demand. In nutrient poor young marshes, N limitation may be more severe and new N sources, such as N fixation, more important for plant growth. We measured N fixation and the response of s...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal lagoons positioned along the land margin may play an important role in removing or transforming 'reactive' nitrogen during its transport from land to the ocean. Hog Island Bay is a shallow, coastal lagoon located on the ocean-side of the Delmarva Peninsula in Virginia (USA). External nitrogen inputs are derived primarily from agriculturally...
Article
Full-text available
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Virginia, 2002. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 169-194).
Article
The activity of the benthos, including benthic plants, is important in driving the overall system dynamics in shallow lagoons, due to the high ratio of sediment surface area relative to water volume. In Hog Island Bay, benthic macroalgae appear to be a key regulator of DON dynamics, both while alive and following senescence. We investigated the rol...
Article
Full-text available
In shallow coastal systems where most of the seafloor lies within the photic zone, benthic photoautotrophy is likely to play a key role in regulating carbon and nitrogen cycling. We measured dissolved inorganic carbon exchanges in seasonal microcosm incubations to determine the relative importance of benthic (with and without macroalgae) and water...
Article
The relative biomass of autotrophs (vascular plants, macroalgae, microphytobenthos, phytoplankton) in shallow aquatic ecosystems is thought to be controlled by nutrient inputs and underwater irradiance. Widely accepted conceptual models indicate that this is the case both in marine and freshwater systems. In this paper we examine four case studies...
Article
Full-text available
Physical factors, such as local geomorphology and hydrology, are the primary determinants of biological pattern and process in a salt marsh. The increased topographic relief associated with the creekbank region is thought to control the unique chemistry and productivity found there. This study was designed to examine the role that tidal creeks play...

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Project (1)
Project
Comparing soil microbial biodiversity and function between early newly created wetlands to older created wetlands or older naturally occurring wetlands. Comparison within HGM classifications of Depressional, Riverine and Estuarine. Age range 2 years to150+ years, Wetlands are found in Finger Lakes Region of New York State and a Back Barrier Island (Hog Island) in Virginia. Analysis of soil physiochemical characteristics, biodiversity and floristic quality of wetland plants and biodiversity, community structure and function. Exploring connections between microbes and their abiotic and biotic environment,