Anna Sturrock

Anna Sturrock
University of Essex · School of Life Sciences

PhD

About

30
Publications
10,910
Reads
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882
Citations
Citations since 2016
15 Research Items
771 Citations
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Introduction
I am interested in fish spatial dynamics and how it ties into sustainable management and conservation. I use elemental concentrations and isotope ratios in otoliths (earstones), eye lenses and other tissues to reconstruct the environmental histories and/or physiological condition of the fish at different life stages. By linking these biogeochemical records with environmental datasets, catch records and otolith growth increments we can better understand fish responses to different stressors.
Additional affiliations
May 2012 - present
University of California, Santa Cruz
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • I generally work out of the Bureau of Reclamation, Sacramento.
May 2012 - June 2014
University of California, Santa Cruz
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2008 - April 2012
National Oceanography Centre, Southampton
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
October 2008 - April 2012
University of Southampton
Field of study
  • Plaice otolith microchemistry
February 2006 - February 2008
University of Otago
Field of study
  • Fish ecology
October 2001 - June 2004

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
Truly sustainable development in a human-altered, fragmented marine environment subject to unprecedented climate change, demands informed planning strategies in order to be successful. Beyond a simple understanding of the distribution of marine species, data describing how variations in spatio-temporal dynamics impact ecosystem functioning and the...
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystem management and governance of cross-scale dependent systems require integrating knowledge about ecological connectivity in its multiple forms and scales. Although scientists, managers, and policymakers are increasingly recognizing the importance of connectivity, governmental organizations may not be currently equipped to manage ecosystems...
Article
Full-text available
Rare phenotypes and behaviours within a population are often overlooked, yet they may serve a heightened role for species imperilled by rapid warming. In threatened spring-run Chinook salmon spawning at the southern edge of the species range, we show late-migrating juveniles are critical to cohort success in years characterized by droughts and ocea...
Preprint
Full-text available
Rare phenotypes and behaviours within a population are often overlooked, yet they may serve a heightened role for species imperilled by rapid warming. In threatened spring-run Chinook salmon spawning at the southern edge of the species range, we show late-migrating juveniles are critical to cohort success in years characterized by droughts and ocea...
Poster
Full-text available
Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) populations in California are in decline due to the combined effects of habitat degradation, water diversions, and shifting climate regimes. Effective salmon conservation and management relies on understanding their life history diversity and ability to adapt to environmental change. Monitoring efforts and...
Article
Full-text available
Otolith chemistry has gained increasing attention as a tool for analyzing various aspects of fish biology, such as stock dynamics, migration patterns, hypoxia and pollution exposure, and connectivity between habitats. While these studies often assume otolith elemental concentrations reflect environmental conditions, physiological processes are incr...
Article
Full-text available
Altered river flows and fragmented habitats often simplify riverine communities and favor non‐native fishes, but their influence on life‐history expression and survival is less clear. Here, we quantified the expression and ultimate success of diverse salmon emigration behaviors in an anthropogenically altered California river system. We analyzed tw...
Article
Full-text available
The California Central Valley contains the southernmost native populations of Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, which inhabit a highly variable, anthropogenically altered environment. To mitigate habitat loss and support fisheries, millions of fall‐run hatchery salmon are released each year, often transported downstream to avoid in‐river mor...
Article
Full-text available
Animal migration is the seasonal movement from one region to another and can involve thousands of individuals journeying across continents and oceans. Scientists often use electronic and physical tags to track the movements of migratory fish. However, these tags only work on bigger fish and only give a limited picture of where the fish have been. H...
Article
Full-text available
Fall-run Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from the Sacramento–San Joaquin River system form the backbone of California’s salmon fishery and are heavily subsidized through hatchery production. Identifying temporal trends in the relative contribution of hatchery- versus wild-spawned salmon is vital for assessing the status and resiliency of...
Article
Full-text available
Protecting habitats for imperiled species is central to conservation efforts. However, for migratory species, identifying juvenile habitats that confer success requires tracking individuals to reproduction. Here, we used otolith strontium isotope ratios (87 Sr/ 86 Sr) to reconstruct juvenile habitat use by endangered Sacramento River winter-run Chi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Fisheries have been described as large-scale evolutionary experiments; yet such “experiments” tend to be poorly replicated and therefore lack the predictive power essential for designing appropriate management strategies to minimize the effects of fisheries-induced selection. Large-scale removal of non-native trout from 35 montane lakes in Californ...
Research
Full-text available
Presentation at the 2014 Bay Delta Science Conference. ABSTRACT: The maintenance of life history diversity within and among populations is thought to be critical for the long-term persistence of salmon stocks. Asynchronous population dynamics can buffer stocks against environmental change and provide a stabilizing ‘portfolio effect’. Preserving and...
Article
Full-text available
The loss of genetic and life history diversity has been documented across many taxonomic groups, and is considered a leading cause of increased extinction risk. Juvenile salmon leave their natal rivers at different sizes, ages and times of the year, and it is thought that this life history variation contributes to their population sustainability, a...
Article
Full-text available
Trace element concentrations in fish earstones (‘otoliths’) are widely used to discriminate spatially discrete populations or individuals of marine fish, based on a commonly held assumption that physiological influences on otolith composition are minor, and thus variations in otolith elemental chemistry primarily reflect changes in ambient water ch...
Article
Oxygen isotope ratios from fish otoliths are used to discriminate marine stocks and reconstruct past climate, assuming that variations in otolith d 18 O values closely reflect differences in temperature history of fish when accounting for salinity induced variability in water d 18 O. To investigate this, we exploited the environmental and migratory...
Article
Full-text available
Oxygen isotope ratios from fish otoliths are used to discriminate marine stocks and reconstruct past climate, assuming that variations in otolith δ18O values closely reflect differences in temperature history of fish when accounting for salinity induced variability in water δ18O. To investigate this, we exploited the environmental and migratory dat...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods The maintenance of life history diversity within and among populations is thought to be critical for the persistence of salmon stocks. Preserving and restoring diversity in life history traits is thus central to many recovery efforts, but it is necessary to first understand the way in which environmental factors affect...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT: Most studies that infer geographic distributions of fish using otolith microchemistry assume that environmental factors (e.g. temperature, salinity) outweigh intrinsic effects (e.g. size, condition); however, this assumption has not been rigorously tested, particularly in marine fish. Here, we report the results of a long-term experimenta...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The maintenance of life history diversity is critical for the persistence of salmonid populations and central to many recovery efforts. Juvenile Chinook salmon leave their natal rivers at different sizes, ages and times of the year, and it is thought that this life history variation contributes to their population sustainability. Preserving and res...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
Otolith microchemistry can provide valuable information about stock structure and mixing patterns when the magnitude of environmental differences among areas is greater than the cumulative influence of any vital effects. Here, the current understanding of the underlying mechanisms governing element incorporation into the otolith is reviewed. Hard a...
Article
Full-text available
In coastal populations of invertebrates and fishes, the distribution of discrete subpopulations is influenced by adult and larval dispersal, as well as by the effects of habitat heterogeneity on site fidelity or connectivity. Here, we examine evidence for spatial structure of sea perch, Helicolenus percoides, populations among four fjords in the Fi...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Our goal is to better understand how life history diversity within spring-run populations can help them cope with California Volatile climate and future climate change in a highly perturbed environment. We are using a combination of otolith microchemistry and isotope analysis to get to this research question.
Project
In a human-altered marine environment, fragmented and subjected to unprecedented climate change, planning sustainable strategies for development requires to understand the distribution of marine biodiversity and how its variations impact ecosystem functioning and the evolution of species. Functional Connectivity characterizes the migratory flows of organisms in the landscape. As such, it determines the ecological and evolutionary interdependency of populations, and ultimately the fate of species and ecosystems. Gathering effective knowledge on Marine Functional Connectivity (MFC) can therefore improve predictions of environmental change impacts and help refine management and conservation strategies for the Seas. This is challenging though, because marine ecosystems are particularly difficult to access and survey. Currently, >50 institutions investigate MFC in Europe, by using complementary methods from multiple research fields to describe the ecology and genetics of marine species. SEA-UNICORN aims at coordinating their research to unify the varied approaches to MFC and integrate them under a common conceptual and analytical framework for improved management of marine resources and ecosystems. For this, it will bring together a diverse group of scientists in order to collate existing MFC data, identify knowledge gaps, reduce overlap among disciplines, and devise common approaches to MFC. It will promote their interaction with connectivity theoreticians and ecosystem modelers, to facilitate the incorporation of MFC data into the projection models used to identify priorities for marine conservation. Lastly, it will forge strong working links between scientists, policy-makers and stakeholders to promote the integration of MFC knowledge into decision support tools for marine management and environmental policies.
Project
We are working on documenting and attempting to explain the diversity within and among runs of Central Valley Chinook salmon. Specific studies look at synchrony across populations, ocean growth and spatial distributions of different stocks, phenological match-mismatch dynamics, straying, and other factors affecting population dynamics. We are particularly interested on the effects of management actions (e.g. hatcheries, harvest, and habitat modification and restoration) on system dynamics.