Anna L. Schwartz

Anna L. Schwartz
University of Nebraska Medical Center | UNMC

PhD, FNP, FAAN

About

101
Publications
23,612
Reads
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10,657
Citations
Citations since 2016
24 Research Items
6443 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,0001,200
201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,0001,200
Additional affiliations
June 2012 - October 2016
Northern Arizona University
Position
  • Professor
January 2009 - May 2013
Idaho State University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
August 2005 - July 2008
Arizona State University

Publications

Publications (101)
Article
Full-text available
Aim Exercise can be an effective treatment for cancer-related fatigue, but exercise is not prescribed for many cancer patients. Our specific aim was to compare usual care and a tablet-based fatigue education and prescription program for effects on level of fatigue (primary outcome) and satisfaction with fatigue and amount of exercise (secondary out...
Article
Full-text available
Problem Research productivity is expected of academic faculty, and mentoring can facilitate it. This paper presents a framework for using mentoring to develop researchers in health disciplines. Approach We utilized recent literature reviews, and experience developing researchers at an emerging research institution within the Research Centers for M...
Article
Full-text available
As women age, they typically experience a progressive decrease in skeletal muscle mass and strength, which can lead to a decline in functional fitness and quality of life. Resistance training (RT) has the potential to attenuate these losses. Although well established for men, evidence regarding the benefits of RT for women is sparse and inconsisten...
Article
Full-text available
Many athletes living with and beyond cancer can continue to train and, in some cases, compete during treatment. Following cancer treatment, athletes can return to competitive sport but need to learn to adapt their physical strength and training to the lingering effects of cancer. It is critical for oncology healthcare providers to use the principle...
Preprint
Athletes living with and beyond cancer can continue to train and, in some cases, compete during treatment. Following cancer treatment, athletes can return to competitive sport but need to learn to adapt their physical strength and training to lingering effects of cancer. It is critical for oncology healthcare providers to use the principles of asse...
Article
Full-text available
Mentoring to develop research skills is an important strategy for facilitating faculty success. The purpose of this study was to conduct an integrative literature review to examine the barriers and facilitators to mentoring in health-related research, particularly for three categories: new investigators (NI), early-stage investigators (ESI) and und...
Article
Lay summary: International evidence-based guidelines support the prescription of exercise for all individuals living with and beyond cancer. This article describes the agenda of the newly formed Moving Through Cancer initiative, which has a primary objective of making exercise standard practice in oncology by 2029.
Conference Paper
Physical activity has been shown to improve quality of life, body composition, metabolic and physical function, and survival among cancer survivors. However, no studies have focused on Native American cancer survivors. Methods: Native cancer survivors and family members were enrolled in a 12-week multi-site, randomized supervised and home-based phy...
Chapter
The immediate-posttreatment period covers the time period from the completion of primary adjuvant treatment to the first year of recovery. This chapter will provide an overview of the incorporation of exercise into the care and management of cancer survivors during the immediate posttreatment period when it could lessen or ameliorate many of the si...
Chapter
Exercise prescription for cancer survivors following treatment must account for ongoing long-term and late effects of cancer treatment and their interaction with other comorbid conditions that individuals may experience. Healthcare professionals should inquire about physical activity and exercise at every patient encounter and be prepared to refer...
Article
This article presents a clinical screening and referral framework to enable health care professionals to guide individuals with cancer to safe and effective exercise programs.
Article
Purpose: The number of cancer survivors worldwide is growing, with over 15.5 million cancer survivors in the United States alone-a figure expected to double in the coming decades. Cancer survivors face unique health challenges as a result of their cancer diagnosis and the impact of treatments on their physical and mental well-being. For example, c...
Article
Full-text available
Multiple organizations around the world have issued evidence‐based exercise guidance for patients with cancer and cancer survivors. Recently, the American College of Sports Medicine has updated its exercise guidance for cancer prevention as well as for the prevention and treatment of a variety of cancer health‐related outcomes (eg, fatigue, anxiety...
Article
Full-text available
Despite well-documented benefits of physical activity for cancer survivors, few interventions have been developed for Native American cancer survivors, the population with the poorest survival rates of any group. This paper describes the development and cultural adaptation of a physical activity intervention for Navajo cancer survivors using Interv...
Article
Native Americans experience cancer-related health disparities. Yet, little is known about the current cancer experience in one of the largest Native American tribe, Navajo. A qualitative study of among Navajo cancer survivors, in which focus groups and individual interviews included questions related to perceptions of cancer causes, prevention, and...
Article
American Indians are disproportionately affected by factors that lead to health disparities, however many Native people demonstrate resilience when faced with health risks. Study objectives were to use a resilience framework to identify wellness strategies among American Indian people and to assess health care provider perceptions of American India...
Article
Full-text available
Marginalized communities have a documented distrust of research grounded in negative portrayals in the academic literature. Yet, trusted partnerships, the foundation for Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR), require time to build the capacity for joint decision-making, equitable involvement of academically trained and community investigato...
Article
Full-text available
Physical activity (PA) may improve quality of life and survival among cancer survivors; however, little is known about Navajo cancer survivor PA. We evaluated Navajo cancer survivor PA habits, barriers, and preferences through focus groups and interviews (n = 32). Transcripts were coded in NVivo and major themes summarized by consensus. Survivor ex...
Article
Full-text available
Exercise is associated with significant reductions in the recurrence and mortality rates of several common cancers. Cancer survivors who exercise can potentially benefit from reduced levels of fatigue, and improved quality of life, physical function, and body composition (ie, healthier ratios of lean body mass to fat mass). The amount of activity r...
Article
Physical activity (PA) may improve quality of life and survival among cancer survivors; however, little is known about Navajo cancer survivor PA. We evaluated Navajo cancer survivor PA habits, barriers, and preferences through focus groups and interviews (n = 32). Transcripts were coded in NVivo and major themes summarized by consensus. Survivor ex...
Article
Purpose: This article examines the concept and use of the term cultural safety in Canada and the United States. Design: To examine the uptake of cultural awareness, cultural sensitivity, cultural competence, and cultural safety between health organizations in Canada and the United States, we reviewed position statements/policies of health care a...
Chapter
Many physicians, scientists, and the public are aware that being overweight or obese, classified by body mass index (BMI) of 25–29.9 kg/m2 and ≥30 kg/m2, respectively, is considered a risk factor for several cancers. It is less well known that post-diagnosis weight gain can be associated with poorer outcomes such as increased risk for recurrence, m...
Article
Full-text available
Thorough data management is crucial for the protection of people who participate in research and researcher ability to share results with the public. The impact of inadequate adherence to data management standards is particularly evident in small field sites and among vulnerable populations. Community-engaged research) presents exciting opportuniti...
Article
Current guidelines recommend weight loss in obese cancer survivors. Weight loss, however, has adverse effects on bone health in obese individuals without cancer but this has not been evaluated in breast cancer survivors. We investigated the associations of intentional weight loss with bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turn-over markers in overwei...
Article
Background: The importance of bone health among postmenopausal breast cancer survivors cannot be overemphasized. In addition to bone loss due to aging, secondary bone loss resulting from treatment is a major concern. Although weight loss has adverse effects on bone health in postmenopausal women without cancer, the impact of weight loss on bone hea...
Article
Full-text available
Although methods of cancer detection and treatment have improved, the side effects of treatment can cause profound debilitation that may linger years after treatment ends. Exercise during and after cancer treatment is safe, and it minimizes many of the deleterious physical and emotional side effects. With this evidence in mind, the LIVESTRONG Found...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the effects of a cancer survivor exercise program and an online recovery awareness program (Restwise) on physical outcomes of aerobic capacity and muscle strength. Design: Randomized controlled trial design. Setting: Treasure Valley Family YMCA, Boise, ID. Sample: Fifty cancer survivors. Method...
Chapter
Aging is a universal experience that leads to declines in functional performance, sarcopenia, loss of flexibility, muscle weakness and decreased bone density. Cancer and its treatment accelerate these declines and lead to accelerated aging and disability. Cancer treatment can cause muscle wasting and declines in cardiopulmonary function that do not...
Article
We evaluated whether age moderated the effect of impact + resistance exercise on hip BMD in older post-menopausal breast cancer survivors (BCS). Exercise was more beneficial among younger than older women within our sample, suggesting that much older BCS may require different training programs to improve hip health. Previously, we reported that a p...
Article
Our randomized controlled trial in prematurely menopausal breast cancer survivors showed that impact + resistance training prevented increases in percentage of body fat compared with controls and also improved BMD at the hip and prevented BMD loss at the spine among exercise-trained women who were menopausal for >1 year. Introduction Cancer treatme...
Article
In 2009, the American College of Sports Medicine convened an expert roundtable to issue guidelines on exercise for cancer survivors. This multidisciplinary group evaluated the strength of the evidence for the safety and benefits of exercise as a therapeutic intervention for survivors. The panel concluded that exercise is safe and offers myriad bene...
Article
Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Cancer survivors are often highly motivated to seek information about food choices, physical activity, and dietary supplements to improve their treatment outcomes, quality of life, and overall survival. To address these concerns, the American Cancer Society (ACS) convened a group of experts in nutrition, physical a...
Article
Musculoskeletal health can be compromised by breast cancer treatment. In particular, bone loss and arthralgias are prevalent side effects experienced by women treated with chemotherapy and/or adjuvant endocrine therapy. Bone loss leads to osteoporosis and related fractures, while arthralgias threaten quality of life and compliance to treatment. Bec...
Article
Breast cancer is commonly diagnosed in postmenopausal women, the majority of whom express 1 or more cardiovascular disease risk factors. Cardiovascular disease poses a significant competing risk for morbidity and mortality among nonmetastatic breast cancer survivors. Adjuvant systemic therapies may result in late-cardiac toxicity decades after trea...
Article
Full-text available
Older breast cancer survivors (BCS) report more falls and functional limitations than women with no cancer history. Exercise training could reduce risk factors for future falls and disability. We conducted a randomized, controlled trial in 106 early-stage, postmenopausal BCS who were ≥50 years old at diagnosis and post-treatment. Women were randoml...
Article
Full-text available
Targeted exercise training could reduce risk factors for fracture and obesity-related diseases that increase from breast cancer treatment, but has not been sufficiently tested. We hypothesized that progressive, moderate-intensity resistance + impact training would increase or maintain hip and spine bone mass, lean mass and fat mass and reduce bone...
Article
Early detection and improved treatments for cancer have resulted in roughly 12 million survivors alive in the United States today. This growing population faces unique challenges from their disease and treatments, including risk for recurrent cancer, other chronic diseases, and persistent adverse effects on physical functioning and quality of life....
Article
Cancer-treatment induced bone loss and associated fracture risk is a growing concern for cancer survivors. Exercise offers a non-pharmacologic strategy for preserving bone health during and after treatment, but only until recently has it been studied for its efficacy and safety in cancer survivors. The purpose of this review is to provide an early...
Article
Full-text available
Weight gain is common during and following cancer treatment and contributes to many adverse health consequences and increased risk of recurrence for cancer survivors. The purpose of this longitudinal randomized controlled trial was to compare differences in weight change and body composition among newly diagnosed cancer survivors receiving chemothe...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose/Objectives: To describe risk factors for fracture—bone health and falls—among breast cancer survivors with chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea. Design: Cross-sectional and prospective cohort. Setting: National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center in the Pacific northwest region of the United States. Sample: Breast cancer survivors with che...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose/Objectives: To determine whether clinical characteristics, physical fitness, or physical activity predict fatigue in older, long-term breast cancer survivors. Design: Cross sectional. Setting: National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center in Portland, OR. Sample: 47 women (X age = 69 years) who were at least one year beyond treatment c...
Article
To provide a summary of the research on the effects of exercise on cancer survivors during and following cancer treatment. Electronic data bases, published studies and review articles. While there is a growing body of research on the effects of exercise on cancer survivors, evidence is growing to support exercise interventions to improve quality of...
Article
Cancer cachexia is a common problem among advanced cancer patients. A mixture of beta-hydroxyl beta-methyl butyrate, glutamine, and arginine (HMB/Arg/Gln) previously showed activity for increasing lean body mass (LBM) among patients with cancer cachexia. Therefore a phase III trial was implemented to confirm this activity. Four hundred seventy-two...
Article
Fatigue is the most common side effect of cancer and its treatment, and it frequently goes unrecognized and untreated. While the exact etiology of fatigue is unclear, numerous contributing factors that worsen fatigue can be clinically addressed. Substantial research supports physical exercise as an intervention for fatigue.
Article
Full-text available
To test the effects of aerobic and resistance exercise on changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in women newly diagnosed with stage I-III breast cancer receiving chemotherapy. Randomized clinical trial. Two National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers in metropolitan areas. 66 women with stage I-III breast cancer beginning adjuvant chemother...
Article
Purpose/Objectives: To determine whether clinical characteristics, physical fitness, or physical activity predict fatigue in older, long-term breast cancer survivors. Design: Cross sectional. Setting: National Cancer Institute–designated cancer center in Portland, OR. Sample: 47 women (—X age = 69 years) who were at least one year beyond treatment...
Article
The American Cancer Society (ACS) publishes Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines to serve as a foundation for its communication, policy, and community strategies and ultimately, to affect dietary and physical activity patterns among Americans. These Guidelines, published every 5 years, are developed by a national panel of experts in cancer re...
Article
This report summarizes findings related to the psychometric properties (internal consistency and construct validity) of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and discusses issues related to its use based on data from two clinical studies with diverse samples of cancer patients. Subjects completed a questionnaire that included the PSQI, the Schw...
Article
Full-text available
To examine the effect of exercise and methylphenidate on fatigue, functional ability, and cognitive function in patients with melanoma. Pilot study with comparison to historic controls. University-based cancer center. 12 patients with melanoma entered and completed the study. The mean age was 44 years. Eligible patients were recruited before their...