Anna Schwabe

Anna Schwabe
University of Colorado Boulder | CUB · Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EBIO) Lecture Professor

Doctor of Philosophy
Developing an aquaponic system to grow clean, sustainable Cannabis with a low environmental impact.

About

25
Publications
16,757
Reads
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78
Citations
Citations since 2016
20 Research Items
69 Citations
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Introduction
I investigate genetic relationships and variation in Cannabis sativa. My previous research was centered around conservation and population genetics of rare and endangered plants.
Additional affiliations
March 2019 - present
University of Northern Colorado
Position
  • PhD
Description
  • Pending the approval of my dissertation by the graduate school, I will graduate in early May, 2019.
February 2016 - February 2016
The Gardens on Spring Creek
Position
  • Instructor
Description
  • Covers three basic categories of color theory: the color wheel, color harmony, and the context of how colors are used. Learn how to mix and layer analogous and complimentary colors. Learn how to use color to create depth and perspective
November 2015 - November 2015
The Gardens on Spring Creek
Position
  • Art Instructor Still Life with Colored Pencil
Description
  • In this class you will learn how to create colors using three primary colors (red/blue/yellow and magenta/cyan/green). You will experiment matching colors with various subjects such as flowers, fruits and vegetables.
Education
August 2015 - May 2019
University of Northern Colorado
Field of study
  • Genetic relationships and sources of variation in Canabis sativa
August 2010 - December 2012
University of Northern Colorado
Field of study
  • Population Genetics

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
Full-text available
Natural interspecific hybridization within plants is relatively common and plays an important evolutionary role. Hybridization between rare and common taxa is of concern due to questions of protection status related to hybrids. However, field based identification of hybrid plants can be challenging. Sclerocactus glaucus (Cactaceae), the Colorado ho...
Poster
Full-text available
Cannabis sativa is listed as a schedule 1 substance by the United States Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). Although Cannabis has been federally illegal since 1937, many states are beginning to allow regulated medical and/or recreational use. Legal restrictions have limited Cannabis research, but legislation is changing and the general population’s att...
Article
Full-text available
Instructors struggle with the amount of information they are expected to teach in the limited number of hours that are available in undergraduate human anatomy and physiology laboratories and students struggle with how to learn the terminology. When a snowstorm closed our campus, labs were cancelled for five of our fourteen lab sections. The gradua...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Cannabis sativa has been cultivated for thousands of years and is hailed as one of the most versatile sustainable crops used for fiber, food, fuel, pharmaceuticals and fun. The single species genus has been a source of debate for taxonomists, but is commonly divided into two usage groups: hemp and drug. Hemp-types are generally cultivated for fiber...
Presentation
Full-text available
Cannabis sativa is federally illegal and largely illegal worldwide. However, due to recent state legislation changes, eight states plus Washington DC legally allow the sale of Cannabis for recreational consumption, and 28 states allow Cannabis for medicinal use. Changes in legal status has resulted in an unprecedented surge of newly developed strai...
Article
Full-text available
Cannabis sativa L. is grown and marketed under a large number of named strains. Strains are often associated with phenotypic traits of interest to consumers, such as aroma and cannabinoid content. Yet genetic inconsistencies have been noted within named strains. We asked whether genetically inconsistent samples of a commercial strain also display i...
Article
Full-text available
The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is the sole producer of Cannabis for research purposes in the United States, including medical investigation. Previous research established that cannabinoid profiles in the NIDA varieties lacked diversity and potency relative to the Cannabis produced commercially. Additionally, microsatellite marker analy...
Article
Full-text available
Currently in the United States, the sole licensed facility to cultivate Cannabis sativa L. for research purposes is the University of Mississippi, which is funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Studies researching Cannabis flower consumption rely on NIDA-supplied “research grade marijuana.” Previous research found that cannabinoid...
Preprint
Full-text available
The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is the sole producer of Cannabis for research purposes in the United States, including medical investigation. Previous research established that cannabinoid profiles in the NIDA varieties lacked diversity and potency relative to the Cannabis produced commercially. Additionally, microsatellite marker analy...
Thesis
Full-text available
For thousands of years, humans have cultivated and dispersed Cannabis sativa L. across the globe. Although Cannabis has been largely illegal worldwide for decades, public perceptions and attitudes are changing. Increasing interest in potential Cannabis usage worldwide and nationwide is leading to less restrictions to make way for an expanding and l...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Unlike other plants, Cannabis sativa is excluded from regulation by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Distinctive Cannabis varieties are ostracized from registration and therefore nearly impossible to verify. As Cannabis has become legal for medical and recreational consumption in many states, consumers have been expo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Public comfort with Cannabis (marijuana and hemp) has recently increased, resulting in previously strict Cannabis regulations now allowing hemp cultivation, medical use, and in some states, recreational consumption. There is a growing interest in the potential medical benefits of the various chemical constituents produced by the Cannabis plant. Cur...
Preprint
Full-text available
Cannabis sativa is listed as a Schedule I substance by the United States Drug Enforcement Agency and has been federally illegal in the United States since 1937. However, the majority of states in the United States, as well as several countries, now have various levels of legal Cannabis. Products are labeled with identifying strain names but there i...
Presentation
Full-text available
The United States is one of several countries relaxing previously strict regulations on Cannabis. Genetic comparisons within Cannabis strains from different sources find there are inconsistencies even though Cannabis is largely propagated by cloning. Cannabis is known to be highly plastic, not only in morphology, but also chemical profile. The chem...
Article
Full-text available
Students struggle with the amount of information they are expected to learn in undergraduate human anatomy and physiology labs. Often the models used in labs look different from the figures or images in the lab manuals purchased from publishing companies and therefore studying at home with lab manual diagrams can be an unnecessarily frustrating and...
Article
Full-text available
Premise of the study Microsatellite primers were developed to characterize genetic diversity and structuring in the genus Phacelia (Hydrophyllaceae) and to further conservation efforts for P. formosula. Methods and Results Fifteen novel microsatellite primers were developed for P. formosula. These were characterized for genetic variation in three...
Presentation
Full-text available
Presently in the United States, Cannabis sativa isfederally illegal and listed as a Schedule 1 substance. However, due to recent state legislation changes, 8 states and Washington DC allow legal recreational Cannabis consumption, and 28 states allow Cannabis usefor treatment of medical symptoms. The change in legal status of Cannabis has resulted i...
Poster
Full-text available
Although research on the chemical constituents of Cannabis, including cannabinoids and terpenes, is abundant, relatively few genetic studies have been conducted, and the origins and genetic identities of most Cannabis strains are largely unknown. There are even fewer strain specific Cannabis studies assessing genetic and chemical aspects together....
Poster
Full-text available
Research on the chemical constituents of Cannabis, including cannabinoids and terpenes, is abundant. However, relatively few genetic studies have been conducted and the origins and genetic identities of most Cannabis strains are largely unknown. This study aims to investigate genetic and chemical aspects of multiple Cannabis strains concomitantly t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The federally threatened Dudley Bluffs mustards (Physaria congesta Rollins and Physaria obcordata Rollins: Brassicaceae) are two rare plants in Colorado with global classifications of G1 and G1G2 respectively. Both plants are known only from the Piceance Creek Basin in Rio Blanco County, Colorado and occupy roughly 575 square Kilometers. Although t...
Article
Full-text available
Recently collected material was used to evaluate the phylogenetic position of the secotioid fungus Araneosa columellata. We amplified the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene (ITS1, ITS2, and LSU) and found Ar. columellata to be a member of the genus Agaricus (Agaricaceae, Agaricales), necessitating its transfer to that genus as Agaricus columellatus comb. n...
Conference Paper
Corispermum navicula occurs only in two cold-climate sand dunes of Northern Colorado. These two dune complexes are about six miles apart and together constitute a total of six square miles of habitat for C. navicula. The two dunes are both public lands but are managed by two different agencies with varying degrees of protection from development and...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The genus Sclerocactus was first described in the early 20th Century and included only two species. Taxonomic circumscription has been fiercely debated for years with the most recent assessment defining 15 species and 17 subspecies that have been identified using morphological characteristics, which are variable within and between species. Scleroca...
Thesis
Full-text available
Sclerocactus glaucus is an endemic Colorado species that is federally threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Sclerocactus glaucus is losing habitat due to disturbance by oil and gas exploration, urbanization, open range cattle grazing and recreational land use. Due to the low number of wild populations, conservationists question the genetic i...
Article
The genus Sclerocactus (Cactaceae) consists of 15 species, which have a confused taxonomic history due to morphological similarities and distribution overlap. Habitat loss and hybridization are of concern and have established cause for genetic investigations to further understand the genus and develop conservation strategies. Thirteen variable micr...

Questions

Questions (6)
Question
Hello all-
I am looking for is some sort of evidence/research to show that various methods for isolating botanical molecules (lets say nicotine, caffeine, cannabinoids etc) produce comparable/identical products, even though the method of extraction and/or isolation may differ.
There are several methods, but the general consensus from what I hear is that the end isolated molecule is the same no matter the method of isolation (eg: CO2 extraction versus isopropyl alcohol extraction). I am having a heck of a time finding scientific literature that has actually compared and characterized isolates of the same molecule using different methods and found them to be the same identical molecules.
Yes, I know, a molecule is a molecule no matter the source, but I am finding this to be an assumption. Maybe I am missing some older, or basic tried and true references, but I am also not a chemist, so this is sort of toeing the line of what is in my wheelhouse.
I would really appreciate any and all help to finding resources. Thanks in advance
Question
Hi All-
I am hoping someone can direct me to some related sources. I am researching Cannabis, and I have a feeling when seed production begins following pollination, the plant reallocates energy into producing seeds and ceases putting energy into the flower (including production of phytochemicals). I am having a heck of a time tracking down relevant literature, but I know someone on here knows something about this! Thanks in advance- Anna

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