Anna S. Przybylska-Piech

Anna S. Przybylska-Piech
Nicolaus Copernicus University | umk · Department of Vertebrate Zoology and Ecology

PhD

About

11
Publications
1,198
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
20
Citations
Citations since 2016
11 Research Items
20 Citations
201620172018201920202021202202468
201620172018201920202021202202468
201620172018201920202021202202468
201620172018201920202021202202468

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
Energy conservation is a clear function of torpor. Although many studies imply that torpor is also a water saving strategy, the experimental evidence linking water availability with torpor is inconclusive. We tested the relative roles of water and energy shortages in driving torpor, using the Siberian hamster Phodopus sungorus as a model species. T...
Article
Full-text available
Proper housing conditions are important aspects of animal welfare. Animals housed in enriched environments show less stereotypic behaviours than animals kept in barren cages. However, different types of cage enrichment may affect the results of experimental studies and hinder comparative analyses of animal physiology and behaviour. We investigated...
Article
Nonresponding Siberian hamsters Phodopus sungorus do not develop the winter phenotype with white fur, low body mass (mb) and spontaneous torpor use in response to short photoperiod. However, their thermoregulatory response to fasting remains unknown. We measured body temperature and mb of 12 nonresponders acclimated to short photoperiod and then to...
Preprint
The vertebrate photoperiodic neuroendocrine system uses photoperiod as a proxy to time annual rhythms in reproduction. To investigate seasonal adaptation in mammals, the hinge region and the first part of the transmembrane domain of the Tshr gene were sequenced for 278 common vole ( Microtus arvalis ) specimens from 15 localities in Western Europe,...
Article
Full-text available
Background The theory of delayed life history effects assumes that phenotype of adult individual results from environmental conditions experienced at birth and as juvenile. In seasonal environments, being born late in the reproductive season affects timing of puberty, body condition, longevity, and fitness. We hypothesized that late-born individual...
Article
Full-text available
Living in a seasonal environment requires periodic changes in animal physiology, morphology and behaviour. Winter phenotype of small mammals living in Temperate and Boreal Zones may differ considerably from summer one in multiple traits that enhance energy conservation or diminish energy loss. However, there is a considerable variation in the devel...
Article
Full-text available
Background Shortening photoperiod triggers seasonal adjustments like cessation of reproduction, molting and heterothermy. However there is a considerable among-individual variation in photoresponsiveness within one population. Although seasonal adjustments are considered beneficial to winter survival, and natural selection should favor the individu...
Article
Full-text available
Living in a seasonally changing environment requires periodic, reversible changes in animals' phenotypes to match variations in their abiotic and biotic environments. These changes may relate to temperature regulation, torpor use, basal metabolic rate, body mass or behaviour, all acting in concert to ensure the best adjustment to the environmental...
Article
Full-text available
According to theoretical predictions endothermic homeotherms can be classified as either thermal specialists and thermal generalists. In high cost environments thermal specialists are supposed to be more prone to use facultative heterothermy than generalists. We tested this hypothesis on the intraspecific level using laboratory male mice (C57BL/cmd...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Winter phenotypes, responding and nonresponding to short photoperiod, differ in morphological and physiological traits. We suggest that this polymorphism is related to body mass. We hypothesize that polymorphism in winter phenotype is an effect of delayed life history effects (DLHEs). We predict that individuals born latter during the year have less time to grow up before winter, they are smaller and they decrease energy expenditure to survive winter. These individuals will be responders and will use daily torpor. However, differences in body mass may also result from differences in food intake. Thus, we hypothesize that polymorphism in winter phenotype is related to interindividual differences in behavioral traits affecting foraging efficiency. We predict that shy and less active individuals would have lower growth rate and lower body mass at the beginning of winter, and ultimately to the necessity of energy saving by use of daily torpor. Thus, these animals will change their phenotype to a winter one, and will be responders. These two factors (i.e. date of birth and behavioral traits linked to foraging efficiency) may together or separately affect body mass, which would be a proximate factor for polymorphism in winter phenotype within one population.