Anna Olivé Abelló

Anna Olivé Abelló
Institut de Ciències del Mar · Department of Oceanography and technologies

FPU PhD Student

About

4
Publications
286
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0
Citations
Citations since 2016
4 Research Items
0 Citations
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Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Full-text available
The equatorial retroflection of the North Brazil Current (NBC) into the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) and its posterior tropical recirculation is a major regulator for the returning limb of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Indeed, most surface and thermocline NBC waters retroflect at the equator all the way into the central and east...
Article
Full-text available
Temperature and conductivity fluctuations caused by the hydrothermal emissions released during the degasification stage of the Tagoro submarine volcano (Canary Islands, Spain) have been analysed as a robust proxy for characterising and forecasting the activity of the system. A total of 21 conductivity-temperature-depth time series were gathered on...
Article
Full-text available
Southern Ocean waters enter the South Atlantic Ocean through the Scotia Sea along pathways constrained by the bathymetry of the northern Scotia Sea passages. We use the Argo profiling‐float data set to calculate the water transports in and out of the region, focusing on the water balances down to the deepest isoneutral sampled in all passages (γⁿ =...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Earth's climate is largely conditioned by the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), also known as the global conveyor belt. During the winter season at the high latitudes of the North Atlantic Ocean and around the Antarctic continent, the newly-formed waters sink and travel along the ocean before returning to their initial formation place. This circuit takes hundreds of years, and transfers the surface waters, which store large amounts of heat and carbon dioxide, towards the deep ocean, whilst the deep waters upwell, loaded with inorganic nutrients in order to maintain high rates of primary production. Furthermore, the return of Antarctic waters to the high latitudes is much complex going through a whole series of topographic and dynamical obstacles. Hence, the main research line tries to understand how and where this incorporation takes place, in one of the more remote and less studied regions of our planet, and determine the hydrography and fluxes of Antarctic waters towards the South Atlantic Ocean: the first and most challenging phase of the return branch of the AMOC.