Anna-Maria Strittmatter

Anna-Maria Strittmatter
Norwegian School of Sport Sciences (NIH) · Department of Cultural and Social Studies

Associate Professor in Sport Management

About

35
Publications
2,784
Reads
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115
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2017 - present
Norwegian School of Sport Sciences (NIH)
Position
  • Head of Department
October 2015 - present
Telemark Research Institute Norway
Position
  • Guest Lecturer Sport Policy and Adminsitration
Description
  • Topic: Youth Sport Policy and Youth Elite Sport Events
October 2014 - February 2017
Norwegian School of Sport Sciences (NIH)
Position
  • PhD Canidate

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study is to examine how participating in an international research project (IRP) can impact the way early-career academics (ECAs) perceive academia and thus their professional identity development. Based on neoinstitutional theory, we examine autoethnographic memory stories of six ECAs within sport management who participated in...
Article
Full-text available
Contemporary sport governance contexts are marked by a trend towards efficiency-based board composition and an increasing use of instruments aimed to (re)shape boards. Yet, democratic gov-ernance is integral to many countries' sport systems, and research tells us that representation still matters in sport governance. Considering this, the aim with...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Aim and Research Questions The aim of this study is to map the challenges that sport clubs face in using good governance and ethical leadership principles. The research question can be summarised as: what are the challenges that sport clubs of different organisational capacity face in implementing good governance and ethical leadership principles a...
Article
Full-text available
Research Question: The purpose of this paper is to construct knowledge on the working processes of nomination committees (NCs) in sport and analyze their potential to shape board composition. The significance of such an effort lies in its potential to shed light on the processes preceding the structures and practices created for the wielding of pow...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to explore how a youth sport development programme in connection with a major event may facilitate sustainable outcomes for the organization of youth sports in Norway. The context of the study involved the Norwegian Olympic and Paralympic Committee and Confederation of Sports’ initiative to increase young people’s engageme...
Article
Full-text available
While colonization as policy is formally a historic phenomenon in Norway and elsewhere, many former structures of state organization – including their relationship to sport – remain under post-colonial conditions. This paper is concerned with how the Norwegian government contributes to creating a situation, which includes the Norwegian sports confe...
Article
The organising committee at the 2012 World Snowboarding Championships in Oslo experienced major problems such as uncertainty among the junior managers and general chaos. Despite this, in external communications, the event was declared to be a success. This article draws on the works of Parent and Seguin (2007) and Parent et al. (2009) to examine th...
Article
This study applies ‘European-ness’ to the analysis of internationalization in the sport management labor market and which changes this trend necessitates for sport management curricula. We employed an analysis of 30 semi-structured interviews with key informants from Germany, Norway and Spain. The results reveal various effects of internationalizat...
Article
Full-text available
Research question: The purpose of this paper is to create knowledge on board-selection processes and their outcomes in terms of board composition. We address two research questions: (1) What evaluative criteria are at play in board-selection processes; and (2) what hierarchies of criteria are formed when evaluative criteria are ranked? The signific...
Article
Full-text available
By providing an analytical framework that draws on a conceptualisation of legitimacy in organisation studies, this paper demonstrates that the sport policy process can be understood as an interlinked chain of legitimating acts. Based on recent suggestions in organisation theory literature on how to approach legitimacy and legitimation, we applied t...
Article
This article examines the current governance structures in international competitive snowboarding and analyses empirically how key actors operate within the diverging logics that shape such structures. We expand upon the existing literature on professional snowboarding by offering a more contemporary understanding of the constantly evolving process...
Article
Full-text available
The Youth Olympic Games (YOG) resembles the Olympic Games in many ways but it has its own identity and characteristics. In this article, we analyse patterns of influence between the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and local organisers prior to the YOG 2016. The findings show that these patterns vary over time and between different areas of go...
Article
The 12th European Youth Olympic Festival (EYOF) was arranged in Austria and Liechtenstein in January 2015. By using a stakeholder framework, the study aims to: (a) identify and differentiate between primary and secondary stakeholders based on their level of influence in planning, implementation and impact of the event; and (b) analyze the challenge...
Conference Paper
This paper reports findings from a study on a policy by the Norwegian Olympic Committee and Confederation of Sports (NIF) aiming at the recruitment of young voluntary leaders into organized sports, the so-called young leaders program (YLP). Utilizing the 2016 Lillehammer Youth Olympic Games (YOG) as contextual motivation, 223 young people (between...
Conference Paper
Being a leader at large-scale sports events involves many diverse and fragmented activities and responsibilities. In this demanding setting, the staff often consists of young professional leaders (here paid leaders with a minimum of five years of leader experience). Research about young leaders at sports events has revealed that organizational boun...
Article
This article discusses the successful bid for the 2016 Lillehammer winter Youth Olympic Games (YOG) and its incorporation within the broader youth sport strategy within organised sport in Norway. Although it is widely accepted that the argument that major sports events are a solution to problems of low levels of involvement in sport is not generall...
Conference Paper
Ongoing discussions within the International Olympic Committee (IOC) about possibly incorporating skateboarding and surfing into the Olympic program for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games, has received attention because of conflicts between different skateboarding organizations campaigning to be the governing international sport federation (IF). An inclu...
Conference Paper
While research into leadership has increased considerably over recent decades, leadership by young people is little explored (Murphy and Johnson 2011), yet at sport events it is common to see young managers (Parent and Smith-Swan 2013). A reason for this could be that sport events tend to have a restricted budget, and highly qualified and experienc...
Article
Neo-institutional concepts of organizational change and organizational reproduction combined with implementation theory are employed to examine the implementation of the Norwegian youth sport policy (YSP) associated with the Youth Olympic Games. The YSP also called ‘youth campaign’, aims at increasing the number of young leaders, young coaches and...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
ID: EASM-2015-113/R1-(627) Abstract: AIM OF THE PAPERR Mega and major sport events, especially the Olympics, are often assigned to be part of a national sport political agenda. In that respect, the 2016 Lillehammer Winter Youth Olympic Games (YOG) is defined as a part of the national youth sport policy defined by the Norwegian Olympic Committee and...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
ID: EASM-2015-90/R1-(598) Synopsis: This investigation shed light on the structure of co-host an event, the actors involved and the challenges and advantages that the co-host Organizing Committee (OC) met when organizing, implementing and evaluating the EYOF. The OC members had to deal with an increasing number of small stakeholders, and perceived...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Increased participation in mass sport and youth sport is often utilized by Olympic host cities and nations as a justification for bidding for major and mega sport events, such as an Olympic sports event (Girginov & Hills, 2009; Veal, Toohey, & Frawley, 2012; Coalter, 2004; Veal & Frawley, 2009; Gratton & Preuss, 2008; Hanstad & Skille, 2010). The N...
Article
This research examines the representation of females in the executive committees of the national football associations of Germany and Norway and their international influence. Pettigrew’s contextual approach to change is used to identify the change process in governance, with a focus on pressures from outside and within sport in general and especia...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
1. AIM OF ABSTRACTT The commitment of the Norwegian Olympic Committee and Confederation of Sports (NIF) to host the Winter Youth Olympic Games 2016 (YOG) in Lillehammer is a significant part of the Norwegian youth sport policy which should ensure to increase the participation of young leaders, volunteers and sportsmen within organized sport. The bi...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The Sport Good Governance Game is a realistic and interactive computer simulation where participants need to make choices to tackle sport specific (doping, match-fixing, unsporting behaviour, ...) and non-sport specific threats (gender equity, interpersonal violence, mediatisation, …). The aim of this project is to help sport organisations and sport managers in their battle against these threats by using good governance and ethical leadership principles. The project is co-funded by Erasmus Sport+
Project
The focus of this project is what arguably has been and continue to be one of Swedish voluntary organized sport’s biggest challenges: members’ (un)equal access to the decision making bodies that govern their sport participation. The problem with skewed representation is especially troubling in systems built on the principles of democracy because it constitutes a threat to the legitimacy of the governance system as such. Illustratively, recent statistics show that 59% of National Sport Organization (NSO) have a gender skewed board (>60% male board members) and 11 out of 71 NSO boards have zero or one female on their board (CIF, 2016a). At the sport club level, 75% of clubs lack board members under the age of 25 (CIF, 2016b). Undisputedly, these facts are completely at odds with claims of being a people’s movement “for all”. Our position is that skewed representation, as exemplified in the preceding, represents a threat to the legitimacy of Swedish voluntary sport’s entire governance system. Because legitimacy is key in maintaining organizational survival and development (Suchman, 1995), skewed representation in extension poses a threat to sport’s ability to gain access to resources (e.g., public funding, members, or volunteers) and to develop in sought after directions (e.g., reduce the biased recruitment to sport by reaching underrepresented groups). The current situation thus calls for knowledge on how representation in Swedish voluntary sport is constructed. This project addresses this need by analyzing and theorizing NSO board nomination processes and their relation to NSO board composition. Compared to the very few previous studies on the present topic (e.g., Claringbould & Knoppers, 2007; Fundberg, 2009; Hovden, 2000), we are not a priori focused on the over- or underrepresentation of any particular social category. Rather, theoretically guided by “repertoire theory” (Swidler, 1986, 2003) we aim to investigate how and why election committees use certain explanations and strategies of action as they perform their task of nominating individuals for election. In line with this theoretical approach and with our ambition to theorize the focal processes, we draw on data from interviews with the chair of all 71 Swedish NSOs’ election committees. This novel design vouches for a significant contribution to the fields of sport management and governance, which have shown scant attention to what is a key process in sport governance practice (Hoye & Cuskelly, 2008: King, 2016).