Anna-Kaisa Reiman

Anna-Kaisa Reiman
University at Albany, The State University of New York | UAlbany · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

44
Publications
14,992
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,222
Citations
Citations since 2017
24 Research Items
938 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
Introduction
Anna-Kaisa Reiman (formerly Newheiser) currently works at the Department of Psychology, University at Albany, State University of New York.
Additional affiliations
August 2014 - August 2020
University at Albany, The State University of New York
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Education
August 2006 - April 2012
Yale University
Field of study
  • Social Psychology

Publications

Publications (44)
Article
Understanding the psychological processes that are involved in the perpetuation and escalation of intergroup conflict remains an important goal for intergroup relations research. In the present research, we examined perceived outgroup entitativity as a potential determinant of intergroup hostility. In intergroup conflict situations, high-entitative...
Article
People who possess a concealable stigmatized identity (e.g., minority sexual orientation; history of mental illness) often hide this identity from others in order to avoid bias. Despite the possible benefits of this identity management strategy, we propose that instead of increasing acceptance, hiding a stigmatized identity can result in a lowered...
Article
Full-text available
Whereas members of high-status racial groups show ingroup preference when attitudes are measured implicitly, members of low-status racial groups-both adults and children-typically show no bias, potentially reflecting awareness of the ingroup's low status. We hypothesized that when status differences are especially pronounced, children from low-stat...
Article
People typically take a moral deservingness perspective when deciding on appropriate punishment for intentional wrongdoings committed by individuals. Considerably less is known about how people reason about wrongdoings committed by groups, even though there are fundamental differences in how people perceive individuals versus groups. The present re...
Article
Despite a decline in explicit prejudice, adults and children from majority groups (e.g., White Americans) often express bias implicitly, as assessed by the Implicit Association Test. In contrast, minority-group (e.g., Black American) adults on average show no bias on the IAT. In the present research, representing the first empirical investigation o...
Article
How do people react to opinion conflict occurring within an ingroup? Whereas some work suggests that dissenting ingroup members evoke more negativity than equivalently dissenting outgroup members (termed the black sheep effect), other research instead finds that people are more receptive to dissent from within the group relative to the same opinion...
Article
Full-text available
Prior work suggests that some cisgender people do not consider gender identity when thinking about what being transgender means, and that exposure to a definition of transgender can reduce negative attitudes toward transgender people. In two studies, we sought to integrate these lines of research by examining whether anti-transgender attitudes are...
Preprint
Prior work suggests that some cisgender people do not consider gender identity when thinking about what being transgender means, and that exposure to a definition of transgender can reduce negative attitudes toward transgender people. In two studies, we sought to integrate these lines of research by examining whether anti-transgender attitudes are...
Article
Full-text available
Swearing is stereotypically associated with socially undesirable traits and behaviors, including limited verbal ability, disagreeable personality, and alcohol use. We sought to demonstrate that, contrary to such stereotypes, swear word fluency (i.e., ability to generate swear words) does not arise from a lack of verbal skills. We also explored whet...
Article
Full-text available
Research shows that people often do not intervene to stop immoral action from happening. However, limited information is available on why people fail to intervene. Two preregistered studies (Ns = 248, 131) explored this gap in the literature by staging a theft in front of participants and immediately interviewing them to inquire about their reasons...
Preprint
Swearing is stereotypically associated with socially undesirable traits and behaviors, including limited verbal ability, disagreeable personality, and alcohol use. We sought to demonstrate that, contrary to such stereotypes, swear word fluency (i.e., ability to generate swear words) does not arise from a lack of verbal skills. We also explored whet...
Article
Do public perceptions of social psychological research align with this field's ostensible goal of describing and explaining real-world social behavior? There has been mounting concern about a disconnect between social psychological research and reality, which in turn raises concerns about social psychology's public image. But do non-experts agree w...
Article
Some cisgender women oppose policies granting transgender women access to women-only bathrooms. We examined whether this opposition stems from perceiving that transgender women threaten the distinctiveness of the social category “women” (gender distinctiveness threat). Cisgender women ( N = 520) read about a state bill enabling transgender women to...
Article
Third-party observers' opinions affect how organizations handle sexual harassment. Prior research has focused on perceptions of sexual harassment targeting straight cisgender women. We examined how targets' sexual orientation and gender identity impact these perceptions. In three preregistered studies, straight cisgender participants imagined a cow...
Article
Dominant majority-group members living in areas with larger proportions of outgroup members tend to express more ingroup bias. However, prior research has rarely considered this in tandem with the bias-reducing effects of intergroup contact or tested whether outgroup proportions have similar effects for oppressed minority-group members. In two prer...
Preprint
Dominant majority-group members living in areas with larger proportions of outgroup members tend to express more ingroup bias. However, prior research has rarely considered this in tandem with the bias-reducing effects of intergroup contact or tested whether outgroup proportions have similar effects for oppressed minority-group members. In two prer...
Preprint
Third-party observers’ opinions affect how organizations handle sexual harassment. Prior research has focused on perceptions of sexual harassment targeting straight cisgender women. We examined how targets’ sexual orientation and gender identity impact these perceptions. In three preregistered studies, straight cisgender participants imagined a cow...
Article
Psychotherapy process research methods often require extensive time and resources. Technology innovations, such as wearable sensors, have the potential to increase the efficiency of process data collection and processing. One such tool is the Sociometric Badge (SB), which is a portable, palm-sized device that can simultaneously record raw audio and...
Article
Few experiments in the domain of addictive behaviors address how response format might impact self-reports of drug use, drug problems, or their correlates. In a preregistered study, participants (N = 1,546) reported on their drinking habits, problematic drinking behaviors, cigarette smoking, Big Five traits, and some additional health behaviors usi...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Crime control theater refers to intuitively appealing laws that appear to address crime while lacking any evidence that they actually do so (e.g., sex offender registration and residence restriction laws, which do not reduce recidivism). Despite their ineffectiveness, public support for such laws tends to be high. Hypotheses: We pred...
Preprint
Full-text available
Objectives: Crime control theater refers to intuitively appealing laws that appear to address crime while lacking any evidence that they actually do so (e.g., sex offender registration and residence restriction laws, which do not reduce recidivism). Despite their ineffectiveness, public support for such laws is high. Hypotheses: We predicted that m...
Article
Group membership enhances well‐being. In two preregistered studies, we tested the assumption that only positively‐viewed groups yield this “social cure” effect and explored the impact of membership in negatively‐viewed groups, proposing that the social cure effect is qualified by group esteem (the degree to which ingroups are valued and liked). In...
Article
Full-text available
It is widely assumed that belief in God allows people to better cope with life’s stresses. This stress-buffering effect is not limited to religion; when faced with stress, nonreligious people cling on to other belief systems, notably belief in science. We report an experimental test of whether people are able to down-regulate an acute stress experi...
Article
Full-text available
We apply a model of interpersonal attachment style to the group domain, examining how attachment to ingroups relates to self‐views, group esteem, and ingroup investment. In Study 1 (N=306), participants completed measures of self‐esteem, group esteem, group attachment insecurity, and investment. Study 2 (N=316) implemented a within‐subjects experim...
Article
Public discourse regarding the treatment of terrorist suspects typically emphasizes utilitarian “greater-good” justifications related to ensuring public safety. By contrast, we hypothesized that laypeople’s judgments of how suspected terrorists ought to be treated are more strongly informed by retributive concerns related to deservingness. Particip...
Article
How do people cope with group members who insult the in-group? The 2016 U.S. Presidential election provided an opportunity to examine this question among group members experiencing unprecedented within-group strife. Participants read an essay written by an in-group or out-group member (Study 1, university affiliation; Study 2, U.S. political party...
Article
What do people want to do in response to witnessing someone violate a moral norm? Prior research posits that violations of distinct norms elicit specific emotions, specifically anger and disgust. We examined whether moral violations analogously elicit distinct behavioral responses, focusing on desires to confront and avoid moral violators. Particip...
Article
In two studies, we examined the impact of concealing (vs. revealing) a stigmatized identity in the context of a recalled or imagined social interaction with one's coworkers. We propose that although people may choose to conceal stigmatized identities in order to increase their chances of acceptance and belonging, identity concealment in fact reduce...
Article
Research inspired by terror management theory has established that being reminded of the inevitability of death (i.e., "mortality salience") leads people to express more negative attitudes toward out-groups. We examined the hypothesis that being affiliated with a religion may buffer individuals against this negative impact of mortality salience. Tw...
Article
Full-text available
The industrialized world is becoming more ethnically diverse. Research in several disciplines has suggested that exposure to racial out-groups may be associated with more positive and more negative intergroup attitudes. Given that U.S. states are often at the center of debate regarding diversity-related public policy, we examined how exposure to ou...
Article
People often choose to hide a stigmatized identity to avoid bias. However, hiding stigma can disrupt social interactions. We considered whether regulatory focus qualifies the social effects of hiding stigma by examining interactions in which stigmatized participants concealed a devalued identity from non-stigmatized partners. In the Prevention Focu...
Article
Evidence that children's system-justifying preferences track the extent of group-based status differences is consistent with the inherence heuristic account. However, evidence that children are inferring inherence per se, or that such inferences are the cause of system-justifying preferences, is missing. We note that, until direct evidence of the i...
Article
Full-text available
Moral judgments are often biased against members of groups stereotyped as immoral (e.g., gay men, African Americans). We propose that these biases can be influenced by the framing of moral judgments. Building on the shifting standards model, we hypothesized that minimum (vs. confirmatory) standards judgments, which may elicit lower expectations for...
Article
Social groups are often described as hierarchically ordered in terms of social status. Intergroup research has generally focused on the relationship between the highest-status group and a single lower-status group, leaving relationships among nondominant groups relatively unexplored. Focusing on low-status Black and intermediate-status Coloured (mu...
Article
Full-text available
Growing evidence indicates that religious belief helps individuals to cope with stress and anxiety. But is this effect specific to supernatural beliefs, or is it a more general function of belief - including belief in science? We developed a measure of belief in science and conducted two experiments in which we manipulated stress and existential an...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the traditional importance of Latinos in the U.S., the growing Latino population, and evidence of group-based disparities, psychological studies of discrimination against Latinos are surprisingly rare. The present research investigated the relationship between prejudice against Latinos and subtle bias, specifically the degree to which peopl...
Article
Although the study of intergroup bias has attracted substantial empirical interest within personality and social psychology, distinctions among types of bias, primarily prejudice and stereotyping, are often not fully considered. However, stereotyping and prejudice are conceptually and empirically distinct phenomena. We investigated how individual-d...
Article
Full-text available
Focusing on a contemporary conspiracy theory popularized in the novel The Da Vinci Code (Brown, 2002), we examined the underlying psychological factors and individual differences that may predict belief in conspiracy theories, and assessed such beliefs’ resistance to counterevidence. Our results suggest that belief in the Da Vinci Code conspiracy m...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we investigate both individual difference (strength of religious attitude, social dominance orientation, and intergroup contact) and situational (mortality salience) variables as predictors of prejudice against Muslims. Among religious participants, strength of religious attitude predicted prejudice, as did SDO. Among non-religious p...
Article
Past research has focused on demographic and skill-acquisition variables, such as age of arrival and length of residence in the host country, to predict accent strength in a nonnative language. The present research investigated the relationships between accent strength and social psychological orientations of nonnative English speakers in the Unite...
Article
Although the negative psychological impact of self-objectification is well-documented, whether people generally recognize this impact in other people remains unclear. We hypothesized that due to their relatively limited experience with self-objectification, men are less likely than women to perceive its ramifications. In Study 1a, where 132 U.S. un...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research suggests that perceived entitativity, which represents the degree to which groups are perceived to possess unity, coherence, and organization, predicts intergroup stereotyping and bias. The present research yielded complementary evidence that prejudice (toward Muslims in Study 1 and toward South Asians in Study 2) can also predict...

Network

Cited By