Anna Jorgensen

Anna Jorgensen
The University of Sheffield | Sheffield · Department of Landscape

About

50
Publications
16,575
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2,167
Citations

Publications

Publications (50)
Article
Full-text available
Social and political policy, human activities, and environmental change affect the ways in which microbial communities assemble and interact with people. These factors determine how different social groups are exposed to beneficial and/ or harmful microorganisms, meaning microbial exposure has an important socio-ecological justice context. Therefor...
Article
Full-text available
Germaphobia – a pathological aversion to microorganisms – could be contributing to an explosion in human immune-related disorders via mass sterilization of surfaces and reduced exposure to biodiversity. Loss of biodiversity and people’s weaker connection to nature, along with poor microbial literacy may be augmenting the negative consequences of ge...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has brought about unprecedented changes to human lifestyles across the world. The virus and associated social restriction measures have been linked to an increase in mental health conditions. A considerable body of evidence shows that spending time in and engaging with nature can improve human health and wellbeing. Our study e...
Preprint
Full-text available
Germaphobia – a pathological aversion to microorganisms – could be contributing to an explosion in human immune-related disorders via mass sterilisation of surfaces and reduced exposure to biodiversity. Loss of biodiversity and our connectedness to nature, along with poor microbial literacy may be augmenting the negative consequences of germaphobia...
Preprint
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has brought about unprecedented changes to human lifestyles across the world. The virus and associated social restriction measures have been linked to an increase in mental health conditions. A considerable body of evidence shows that spending time in and engaging with nature can improve human health and wellbeing. Our study e...
Article
Abstract: Cities are sites of human, ecological and institutional stress. The elements that make up the city – its people, landscapes and metabolisms – are engaged in continual processes of assemblage and disassembly, joining and pulling apart. Reporting the findings of a three-year multi-disciplinary deep case study, this paper examines the role o...
Article
Full-text available
Prescribing nature-based health interventions (green prescribing)-such as therapeutic horticulture or conservation activities-is an emerging transdisciplinary strategy focussed on reducing noncommunicable diseases. However, little is known about the practice of, and socioecological constraints/opportunities associated with, green prescribing in the...
Article
Full-text available
Urban green space can help mitigate the negative impacts of urban living and provide positive effects on citizens’ mood, health and well-being. Questions remain, however, as to whether all types of green space are equally beneficial, and if not, what landscape forms or key features optimise the desired benefits. For example, it has been cited that...
Article
Full-text available
1. Humans are spending less time in biodiverse environments, and according to the Old Friends and Biodiversity hypotheses, this has led to fewer interactions with diverse immunoregulatory microorganisms or 'old friends'. 2. Non-communicable diseases such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease are on the rise, and the development and progression o...
Article
Full-text available
Exposure to greenspace in urban environments is associated with a range of improved health and well-being outcomes. There is a need to understand which aspects of greenspace influence which components of health. We investigate the relationship of indicators of greenspace quantity (total and specific types of greenspace), accessibility and quality w...
Article
Full-text available
Cross-sectional research linking exposure to greenspace with human health rarely describes greenspace characteristics in detail, but a few studies do find that some types of greenspace have greater health benefits than others. We review literature linking landscape metrics to multiple mechanisms by which greenspace exposure is posited to benefit he...
Article
Full-text available
The multiple benefits of ‘nature’ for human health and well‐being have been documented at an increasing rate over the past 30 years. A growing body of research also demonstrates the positive well‐being benefits of nature‐connectedness. There is, however, a lack of evidence about how people's subjective nature experience relates to deliberately desi...
Article
Full-text available
Urban greenspace can improve the health of local residents by facilitating physical activity, psychological restoration, and social contacts, as well as through amelioration of the physical environment and immune system modulation. In some cases, greenspace exposure has been reported to reduce health inequalities associated with deprivation. Howeve...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the growing body of research exploring health benefits of greenspace, most studies treat greenspace as homogenous. There remains a need to focus on ‘quality’ rather than quantity of greenspace. Quality may be a substantial determinant for use and experience within greenspaces and therefore may influence health and well-being benefits derive...
Article
The notion of ecological and green networks is founded on the coherent and connected systems of green and open spaces in the landscape. However, these networks have generally been the outcome of a combination of opportunistic and deliberative planning decisions over time. This study analysed the existing green and ecological network approaches in t...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence that urban green-space promotes health and well-being of urban residents is increasing. The role of biodiversity is unclear: perceived biodiversity may be important, but how accurately it is perceived and the factors influencing this accuracy are poorly understood. We use experimental perennial urban meadows in southern England to investig...
Article
The term palimpsest is sometimes used as a way of conceptualising historic cultural landscapes that have been subject to changes. This paper uses an expanded version of the palimpsest concept (a temporal collage intermingling memories with tangible and intangible elements from different time periods across a range of scales) to focus on a former mi...
Article
Full-text available
Throughout Europe climate change has rendered many plant species used in contemporary urban planting design less fit for use in public greenspaces. A growing evidence base exists for the ecological value of introducing non-native species, yet urban policy and practice guidance continues to portray non-native species negatively, focusing on their as...
Article
Full-text available
Urban populations experience the multiple health and well-being benefits of nature predominantly via urban green infrastructure. If this is to be designed and managed optimally for both nature and people, there is an urgent need for greater understanding of the complex relationships between human aesthetic experience, well-being and actual or perce...
Article
Full-text available
The growing evidence base for the benefits for people and wildlife of nature-based solutions to managing urban green infrastructure lacks research investigating land manager perspectives on their implementation. To address this gap, we explored UK local authority manager perceptions of the challenges and opportunities of introducing perennial urban...
Article
This paper aims to advance the theory and practice of landscape heritage planning, design and management, focusing especially on the question: what are the relationships between landscape narratives – the ways in which we tell the story of a landscape – and landscape heritage outcomes (landscape practice – planning, design, management – based on pa...
Article
Full-text available
We used photo-elicitation studies and a controlled perennial meadow creation experiment at ten urban green-spaces in southern England (five experimental sites and five control sites) to assess green-space visitors’ responses to urban meadows. Multiple meadows, which varied in their structural diversity (height) and plant species richness, were crea...
Article
Full-text available
Papers of four decades published in Landscape Research are reviewed in order to chronicle the journal’s development and to assess the academic performance of the journal relative to its own aims. Landscape Research intends to reach a wide audience, to have a broad thematic coverage and to publish different types of papers with various methodologica...
Article
Full-text available
Green spaces not only provide natural environments in urban areas in various forms and sizes, and with differing functions, but also they contribute to the physical and psychological health and socialisation of citizens. Sheffield is the third largest municipality in the UK and is widely regarded as one of the greenest cities in the UK. Therefore,...
Article
Full-text available
This paper sets out to provide an illustrative discussion of emergent and somewhat decentralised urban uplift through a lens of entrepreneurial urbanism. Informal interventions by citizens and entrepreneurs can positively contribute to the urban environment which in turn provides the setting for real estate assets. This whole landscape perspective...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Urban regeneration strategies are thought to be key driving forces on the road toward greater economic and environmental resilience of cities. Numerous approaches have been adopted internationally over the last decade; however, in city centres so far there has arguably been a prevailing emphasis on strategies promoting gentrification and ‘urban liv...
Article
The dominant view of landscape research in the latter half of the 20th century saw landscape aesthetics as a discrete area of study, a socio-cultural value detached from other considerations. This view was later challenged by proponents of ecological aesthetics, who countered that what makes landscapes beautiful is often intimately linked to other...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we review and analyze the recent research literature on urban green space and human health and well-being, with an emphasis on stud-ies that attempt to measure biodiversity and other green space concepts rel-evant to urban ecological restoration. We first conduct a broad scale assessment of the literature to identify typologies of urb...
Article
This paper seeks to enhance understandings of underlying reasons for attitudes towards a recent landscape phenomenon— mobile telecommunications development— in a protected area. A public questionnaire survey was conducted, using photographs of mobile telecommunications development installed in the Peak District National Park, England. Building on e...
Article
This study explored the public perceptions of mobile telecommunications development - new landscape elements installed to deliver new technology - in a protected area. It examined: (1) the perceived landscape impacts of such development; (2) the importance attached to the socio-economic value of mobile telecommunications; and (3) the factors underl...
Article
Urban dwellers experience conflicting thoughts and feelings about urban woodlands; valued for their natural qualities, the relief they provide from the stress of modern urban living and the opportunities they afford for children's play and exploration. At the same time the seclusion inherent in this type of urban greenspace seems fraught with risk...
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores the origins and development of ambivalent responses to particular contemporary urban landscapes in historical ideas about human relationships with nature and wilderness, and suggests that post-modern wilderness may be found in the urban interstices: in woodland, abandoned allotments, river corridors, derelict or brownfield sites...
Article
This study evaluates “woodland in the ecological style” as a setting for contemporary housing by means of a case study of Birchwood, Warrington New Town, UK, using a postal questionnaire and semi-structured interviews to reveal residents’ perceptions of the aesthetic and safety aspects of the woodland, together with its underlying meanings. Most Bi...
Article
The interaction between spatial arrangement and vegetation structure was systematically examined in the context of an urban park in an impoverished area of Sheffield, UK. Local residents rated digitally manipulated photographs depicting different spatial arrangements of mature trees and edge treatments for safety and preference. Spatial arrangement...

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
Recent engagements, talks and initiatives on Nature-Based Solutions (NBS) and Green Infrastructure (GI) in urban environments
Project
The project is examining the ways in which urban green and blue infrastructure (GBI) improves mental health and wellbeing. It explores the form and location of GBI in Sheffield, how different social groups engage with nature, the impact of GBI on their wellbeing. The cost effectiveness of investing in GBI as a form of therapy will be estimated.
Project
Improving Wellbeing through Urban Nature (IWUN) aim to find out more about how Sheffield's natural environment can improve the health & wellbeing of city residents