Anna Jespersen

Anna Jespersen
Aarhus University | AU · Department of Communication and Culture

Doctor of Philosophy

About

18
Publications
5,014
Reads
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23
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2017 - December 2018
Aarhus University
Position
  • Fellow
January 2017 - December 2018
Aarhus University
Position
  • Fellow
October 2014 - May 2016
University of Cambridge
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Small-group teaching and sessional lectures for Li6 Phonetics, an advanced phonetics course for 3rd year undergraduates and MA students.
Education
October 2012 - August 2016
University of Cambridge
Field of study
  • Theoretical and Applied Linguistics
June 2011 - December 2011
University of Melbourne
Field of study
  • Linguistics
September 2010 - June 2012
University of Copenhagen
Field of study
  • English Language and Literature

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Age is one of the key variables in the field of language variation and change (LVC). The vast majority of experimental work generally views a speaker's date of birth—chronological age—as a good reflection of both their social age, for example, which generation they identify with and how strongly and their biological age, that is, the physiological...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Listeners of different languages have been reported to vary significantly in prominence perception tasks. We know very little, however, about which exact cues different listeners use in these tasks. In this study, we examined the role of duration in the perception of prominence in both typologically different and related languages. The stimuli cons...
Article
Full-text available
The theory of language change has worked primarily with four basic language change profiles: generational change, age‐grading, communal change, and stability. This paper focuses primarily on age‐grading, the process whereby each generation undergoes a specific language change at the same age‐related stage within their lifespan. Despite the necessar...
Article
The Danish language is undergoing rapid standardization: traditional dialects are rapidly disappearing, and studies of language attitudes show that Danes strongly favour standard language over non-standard varieties such as regional dialects. This paper looks at the values and attitudes attached to another type of non-standard Danish, namely that s...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Det danske sprog anses af mange lørnere som svært at lære, og især anses det som svært at blive flydende i. Dette bliver ofte tilskrevet den svære danske udtale. Denne rapport viser, at sprogskolernes håndtering af udtaleundervisning kan bidrage til voksne andetsprogstaleres udtaleproblemer. Her undersøges voksne lørneres og underviseres iagttagels...
Chapter
Full-text available
This study investigates the effects of intonational focus on the implementation of the fortis-lenis contrast. We analyse data from 5 speakers of different English dialects (Ocke's colleagues), with the aim of examining the extent to which different correlates of the contrast are used by each speaker, and whether the contrast is implemented differen...
Presentation
Full-text available
Presentation at Phonetics and Phonology in Europe 2017 http://pape2017.uni-koeln.de/
Presentation
This paper presents work in progress on the phonetic realization of uptalk rises in Northern Irish English, a variety which is well-known for another type of rising intonation, the rise-plateau(-slump) (Cruttenden 1997; Grabe 2002; Ladd 2008). However, a recent pilot study has shown that the steeper and more steadily rising uptalk rise, which is ma...
Poster
Full-text available
Postered presented at Speech Prosody by Yang Li, Adrian Leemann and Anna Jespersen.
Presentation
Full-text available
Oral presentation (delivered with Ricky Chan) of results detailed in a Speech Prosody paper: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/298808125_Towards_a_typology_of_prominence_perception_the_role_of_duration
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Despite their ubiquity in intonational research, high rising terminal (HRT) intonation contours have not been investigated in Aboriginal varieties of Australian English. This paper investigates the form, alignment and use of declarative rises in the Aboriginal English spoken in Sydney. It is shown that Aboriginal speakers used five distinct types o...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Within the field of language variation and change, age is often approached as a social variable (social age), as well as being placed on a par with chronological age (as opposed to biological age). This is the general tendency, despite the multifaceted characteristics of age (e.g. Eckert 1997). The first aim of the research project is to develop the appropriate methodology to conduct linguistic research that considers social age as the key variable, as opposed to chronological age. Most likely because biological age is difficult to determine without obtaining biological data, the role of biological ageing on language variation and change has not received as much attention as, for example, biological sex (vis-à-vis social gender identity). The second aim of the project is to contrast biological and chronological age and establish whether the former has any effects on selected laryngeal phenomena. This will include collection and analyses of production data as well as collection of the speakers’ biomarkers (in collaboration with Gillian Pepper). The project will enable us to establish not only whether biological ageing is a factor relevant for at least some consonantal and vocalic changes, but also what the magnitude of this potential effect may be.
Project
We use the same procedure and stimuli to test prominence perception for speakers of typologically distinct and related varieties. In varying the prosodic properties of the languages tested, we try to tease apart the universal and the language-specific aspects of prominence perception.
Project
My postdoc project aims to investigate the effects of the rise in popularity of uptalk rises in Northern Ireland. What has happened to the NIE rise-plateaux – in terms of their distribution, perception and phonetic realisation?