Anna Ilona Rajala

Anna Ilona Rajala
Tampere University | UTA · Faculty of Social Sciences

PhD, MA, Physiotherapist

About

15
Publications
1,800
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
34
Citations
Introduction
My current Academy of Finland funder postdoctoral research concers the politics of excrement. My other research interests include early Frankfurt school critical theory (Adorno and Horkheimer), recognition in Hegel and critical theory, French philosophy (mainly Bataille and Derrida), medical/health humanities (Shakespeare, modernism, history, and literature), critical physiotherapy, and ethics.
Additional affiliations
January 2022 - October 2022
Tampere University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2021 - December 2021
Tampere University
Position
  • Reseacher
July 2020 - December 2020
Tampere University
Position
  • Instructor
Education
October 2014 - February 2021
University of Brighton
Field of study
  • Humanities
September 2012 - November 2013
University College London
Field of study
  • Philosophy, politics and economics of health
August 2005 - December 2008
Pirkanmaa University of Applied Sciences
Field of study
  • Physiotherapy

Publications

Publications (15)
Chapter
Full-text available
Physiotherapy is undeniably a concrete practice. What then do theoretical considerations on moral matters have to do with it? Drawing on Max Horkheimer’s distinction between critical and traditional theory, I suggest that once the meaning of moral theory is recast as critical theory, in contrast to a mere framework of ethical codes and rules, a dee...
Article
Full-text available
Available at: https://www.jhrehab.org/2020/05/07/perspectives-on-person-centeredness-from-neurological-rehabilitation-and-critical-theory-toward-a-critical-constellation/ This interdisciplinary article addresses the putative gap between person-centeredness and the biomedical model of physiotherapy. We draw both from a primary qualitative study and...
Article
Full-text available
Inkontinenssi, eli virtsan- tai ulosteenkarkailu, on yleinen vaiva. Kehon vuodoista ja vuotojen hallitsemiseen käytettävistä vaipoista, eli inkontinenssisuojista, kuitenkin vaietaan. Jätteiden tavoin ne ovat hyvinvointivaltiossa hyvinvoinnin katveessa. Erilaiset yhteiskunnan rakenteet ja käyttäytymisen normistot sulkevat vaipat hallinnollisen kiele...
Article
Tämä artikkeli tarkastelee synnytinelinten poliittista taloutta tukeutuen feministisen poliittisen talouden kirjallisuuteen ja terveystaloustieteelliseen tutkimukseen inkontinenssin kustannuksista. Artikkeli analysoi biologisen uusintamisen aiheuttamaa psykofyysistä rapautumista (depletion through biological reproduction, DBR) raskauden ja synnytyk...
Conference Paper
When the remains of Richard III (b. 1452 – d. 1485) were found under a car park in Leicester in 2012, it seemed that the scientific medical narrative could finally challenge fiction and myth surrounding the king. The new evidence affirmed that the historical Richard III had adolescent onset idiopathic scoliosis that would have hardly had an effect...
Conference Paper
When the remains of King Richard III of England (b. 1452 – d. 1485) were found under a car park in Leicester in 2012, it seemed that science could prove fiction wrong (sic). The new evidence affirmed that the historical Richard III had adolescent onset idiopathic scoliosis that would have hardly had an effect on his appearance and abilities – a bod...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Conference Paper
Full-text available

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (7)
Project
This project focuses on excrement that is either made public or made in public, and the political and ethical questions about equality and justice that it raises. Excrement is political and ethical because it is necessary and central to all life. The purpose is to study and develop the politics of faeces in Finland and globally by mapping the sensory aspects of faeces and defecation as political and ethical issues; by developing the concepts of intestinal and visceral citizenship; and by analysing (in)equalities of toileting and the socioeconomic stigmatisation of public defecation. By analysing the practices and attitudes around faeces in care, urban spaces, and arts, the aim is to understand the political and ethical aspects of faeces and defecation in Finnish society and in the global context to reduce inequalities related to defecation, to improve the valuation of “dirty work” in addressing the care deficit in aging societies, and to mobilise the radical potential of faeces.
Project
Statistics of the growing population of people with dementia are repeatedly offered as rationale for research and developing more efficient rehabilitation pathways in dementia. However, the statistical discourse portrays, unwittingly perhaps, people with dementia as a rapidly growing mass of dysfunctional bodies that need to be ‘managed’ because of the growing cost of dementia. In this context, rehabilitation is translated as an economic asset to lessen the (economic) ‘burden’ that falls on other caring hands. Rehabilitation thus contributes to the neoliberal discourse of cost-containment and cost-efficiency. I argue in this analytical-theoretical paper that reading the vulnerability of bodies against neoliberalism offers a more fruitful and caring framework for dementia rehabilitation. Rehabilitation stands as if outside of care because it tends to physical functioning through progressive and targeted exercise rather than every-day care with affective and corporeal dimensions. However, the person with dementia stands as a friction to progression and independence. Dementia thus forms a ‘peri-capitalist site’ (Anna Lowehaupt Tsing, 2015) at the fringes of capitalist logic—a site that is untranslatable to capitalist logic, but nevertheless is continuously translated into that logic. I argue against the translation into capitalist logic that rehabilitation in dementia is an entangled affective and corporeal practice that forms an alternative landscape for international political economy that values quality over quantity. If rehabilitation is understood as a caring practice, rather than simply progressive practice aiming at greater independence, dementia becomes a site of resistance to the discourse of ‘burden’.
Project
This project is a part of a collaboration on Shakespeare and philosophy, and will be an ongoing academic "side project" in which I examine medical issues and topics in Shakespeare's work through critical theory. My particular interests are on the tension between sovereignty and illness - particularly in Richard III (disability discourse); and King Lear (madness, old age, and selfhood). I'm also interested in the link between (non)agency and (self)mutilation in Early Modern plays, e.g. Gloucester in King Lear, Lavinia in Titus Andronicus, and Marlowe's Tamburlaine.