Anna Dorfman

Anna Dorfman
Bar Ilan University | BIU · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

28
Publications
9,675
Reads
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221
Citations
Citations since 2016
23 Research Items
217 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080
Introduction
I am a behavioral social scientist, interested in emotions, open-minded reasoning, and social hierarchy in organizational and everyday contexts.
Additional affiliations
October 2021 - present
Bar Ilan University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Description
  • I am an assistant professor in Social and Organizational Psychology. I am interested in how people manage challenging situations in the workplace and beyond. I teach undergraduate and graduate-level courses in organizational psychology, social psychology, and emotions.
September 2018 - August 2021
University of Waterloo
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Exploring the links between emotions and open-mindedness in organizational contexts and in daily life.
September 2015 - August 2018
Tel Aviv University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Research in Organization behavior focused on perceptions of social hierarchy and inequality of individual and on the country level.
Education
October 2010 - January 2016
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (28)
Preprint
Full-text available
How do people reason in response to ambiguous messages shared by admirable individuals? Using behavioral markers and self-report questionnaires, in two experiments (N = 571) we examined the influence of speakers’ admirability on meaning-seeking and wise reasoning in response to pseudo-profound bullshit. In both studies, statements that sounded supe...
Chapter
Full-text available
Focusing on one’s adversity can be a source of strength, facilitating meaning-making and growth. However, adversity can also lead to depression, anxiety, and trauma-related stress. The authors propose that the self-perspective one takes while reflecting on adversity—that is, self-distanced (third-person perspective on one’s experiences) versus self...
Article
Full-text available
Research on consequences of adversity appears inconclusive. Adversity can be detriment to mental health, promoting maladaptive patterns of thoughts. At the same time, posttraumatic growth studies suggest that overcoming major adversity facilitates growth in wisdom-related patterns of thoughts. We address this puzzle by examining how distinct types...
Article
Full-text available
How can people wisely navigate social conflict? Two preregistered longitudinal experiments (Study 1: Canadian adults; Study 2: American and Canadian adults; total N = 555) tested whether encouraging distanced (i.e., third-person) self-reflection would help promote wisdom. Both experiments measured wise reasoning (i.e., intellectual humility, open-m...
Preprint
Full-text available
Wisdom has been a central theme in the philosophical inquiry of the human experience for centuries, with the earliest written teachings dating back to the ancient Egyptian vizier, Ptahhotep 25-24 century BCE. The virtue of wisdom has been attributed to the great deities of various cultures and mythologies (e.g., Anahit of Armenia, Athena of Greece)...
Preprint
Full-text available
Research on consequences of adversity suggests a puzzle. On the one hand, posttraumatic growth studies suggest that working through major adversity facilitates growth in wisdom. On the other hand, working through adversity can exacerbate negative emotions and thoughts. We address this puzzle by examining how distinct forms of adversity impact wisdo...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Posttraumatic growth typically refers to enduring positive psychological change experienced as a result of adversity, trauma, or highly challenging life circumstances. Critics have challenged insights from much of the prior research on this topic, pinpointing its significant methodological limitations. In response to these critiques, we...
Preprint
Posttraumatic growth typically refers to enduring positive psychological change experienced as a result of adversity, trauma, or highly challenging life circumstances. Critics have challenged insights from much of the prior research on this topic, pinpointing its significant methodological limitations. In response to these critiques, we propose tha...
Preprint
Full-text available
Folk beliefs and philosophers have long suggested that mastering adversity contributes to growth in wisdom –adaptability to the situation, perspectivism, dialectical thinking, and epistemic humility. But existing research on outcomes of adversity suggests a puzzle. On the one hand, cross-sectional studies have found adversity leads to post-traumati...
Article
Objective: This research examines changes in emotionality following adverse experiences in daily life. We tested whether daily self-distancing (vs. self-immersing) in reflections on adversity results in positive change in emotionality. Additionally, we probed the "dosage" effect of repeated self-distancing. Method: A micro-longitudinal field exp...
Preprint
Full-text available
Six studies (N = 1,617) tested the role of dispositional rejection sensitivity (RS) and manipulated power position for wise reasoning among managers and subordinates in workplace conflicts: intellectual humility, consideration of change/multiple ways a situation may unfold, recognition of others’ perspectives, search for compromise/resolution, and...
Chapter
Climate change, proliferation of ultranationalist movements in various parts of the globe, tribalism, and denial of science—in times like these social critiques and philosophers often call for greater wisdom. What is wisdom and how does it develop? Philosophers argue that knowledge is insufficient for wisdom. Instead, they have argued that wisdom r...
Article
Typical approaches to study practical wisdom are person-centric, use flawed methods, and produce insights of little relevance to the construct's definition. We propose that understanding the processes underlying practical wisdom requires a social-ecological framework, supported by emerging empirical insights. Wise reasoning (i.e., intellectual humi...
Preprint
This research examines changes in emotionality following adverse experiences in daily life. We find that an experimentally manipulated self-distanced reflection can promote emotional growth in the face of everyday adversity. Notably, the effectiveness of repeated self-distancing has a saturation point. In contrast, a self-immersed reflection on adv...
Preprint
Full-text available
Typical approaches to study practical wisdom are person-centric, use faulty methods and produce insights of little relevance to construct’s definition. We propose that understanding the mental processes underlying practical wisdom require a social-ecological framework, supported by emerging empirical insights. Wise reasoning (i.e., intellectual hum...
Preprint
Full-text available
We tested the utility of illeism – a practice of referring to oneself in the third person – for the trainability of wisdom-related characteristics in everyday life: i) wise reasoning (intellectual humility, open-mindedness in ways a situation may unfold, perspective-taking, attempts to integrate different viewpoints) and ii) accuracy in emotional f...
Preprint
Social incentives concern a broad range of interpersonal rewards and motivations that encourage people to behave in a socially valued and approved manner. Social incentives include projecting a positive social image and reputation, gaining social acceptance, and gaining a better place in the social hierarchy.
Preprint
Climate change, proliferation of ultra-nationalist movements in various parts of the globe, tribalism, and denial of science in some parts of the globe – in times like these social critiques and philosophers often call for greater wisdom. What is wisdom and how does one develop it? Philosophers argue that knowledge is insufficient for wisdom. Inste...
Article
Full-text available
Intergroup interactions allow members of advantaged groups to cooperate with in-group and out-group members alike (universal cooperation), cooperate with in-group members exclusively (parochial cooperation), or withhold cooperation altogether. These options impact the intergroup hierarchy differently; therefore, individuals’ ideological support of...
Poster
Full-text available
Unconscious-thought-theory asserts that complex choices are better following unconscious thought. Examining the role of interest, we found that for interesting matters, people prefer to engage with conscious rather than unconscious thought (Experiment 1), and in line with this preference, the former leads to better choices (Experiments 2-3).
Article
In social dilemmas, broad collective interests conflict with immediate self-interests. In two studies, we examine the role of pride in guiding cooperative behavior in a social dilemma. We find that the consideration of pride led to more cooperation compared to the consideration of joy or a control condition (Study 1) and compared to the considerati...
Article
Full-text available
Choosing a major field of study to secure a good job after graduation is a tacit coordination problem that requires considering others' choices. We examine how feeling skillful, either induced (Experiment 1) or measured (Experiment 2), affects coordination in this type of task. In both experiments participants chose between two lotteries, one offer...
Data
Instructions for Experiment 1 for the computer condition. (DOCX)
Data
Instructions for Experiment 2 for the computer condition. (DOCX)
Article
The current research examines the effect of feeling skillful on tacit coordination behavior in a lottery selection task. In two experiments participants were asked to choose between one of two lotteries, where one lottery had a larger prize than the other. We manipulated the relevance of skill and examined how one’s feelings of skillfulness affect...

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