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Anikó B. Tóth

Anikó B. Tóth
UNSW Sydney | UNSW · School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences (BEES)

Doctor of Philosophy

About

23
Publications
8,594
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351
Citations
Introduction
Anikó B. Tóth is a Postdoctoral fellow at the Centre for Ecosystem Science at University of New South Wales. She received her PhD in 2020 from the Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University. Anikó does research in Ecosystem conservation, Evolutionary Biology and Macroecology. She is interested in community assembly over large spatiotemporal scales, particularly the role of species interactions and co-occurrence in maintaining ecosystem stability and biodiversity.
Additional affiliations
December 2019 - present
UNSW Sydney
Position
  • PostDoc Position
May 2011 - March 2016
Smithsonian Institution
Position
  • Researcher
Education
March 2016 - September 2019
Macquarie University
Field of study
  • Macroecology, macroevolution

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Biotic homogenization—increasing similarity of species composition among ecological communities—has been linked to anthropogenic processes operating over the last century. Fossil evidence, however, suggests that humans have had impacts on ecosystems for millennia. We quantify biotic homogenization of North American mammalian assemblages during the...
Article
Interspecific spatial associations (ISA), which include co‐occurrences, segregations, or attractions among two or more species, can provide important insights into the spatial structuring of communities. However, ISA has primarily been examined in the context of understanding interspecific interactions, while other aspects of ISA, including its rel...
Article
Cities and agricultural fields encroach on the most fertile, habitable terrestrial landscapes, fundamentally altering global ecosystems. Today, 75% of terrestrial ecosystems are considerably altered by human activities, and landscape transformation continues to accelerate. Human impacts are one of the major drivers of the current biodiversity crisi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Recent renewed interest in using fossil data to understand how biotic interactions have shaped the evolution of life is challenging the widely held assumption that long-term climate changes are the primary drivers of biodiversity change. New approaches go beyond traditional richness and co-occurrence studies to explicitly model biotic interactions...
Article
Full-text available
The late Quaternary of North America was marked by prominent ecological changes, including the end-Pleistocene megafaunal extinction, the spread of human settlements and the rise of agriculture. Here we examine the mechanistic reasons for temporal changes in mammal species association and body size during this time period. Building upon the co-occu...
Preprint
Interspecific spatial associations (ISA), which include co-occurrences, segregations, or attractions among two or more species, have been an under-represented topic in biodiversity science and in large-scale assessments of biodiversity change in the anthropocene. Also, ISA has not been perceived as a facet of biodiversity on par with beta diversity...
Article
Full-text available
Large mammals are at high risk of extinction globally. To understand the consequences of their demise for community assembly, we tracked community structure through the end-Pleistocene megafaunal extinction in North America. We decomposed the effects of biotic and abiotic factors by analyzing co-occurrence within the mutual ranges of species pairs....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Human population has exponentially grown since the last glaciation, especially across temperate areas with easy access to water sources, excluding mammal species from their former habitats. Thus, we anticipate a change in environmental niche preferences for temperature and precipitation as increased human population forces mammal species into more...
Conference Paper
Large mammals are at disproportionately high risk of extinction globally, and the ecological impacts of their loss will last beyond our lifetimes. Research shows that the end-Pleistocene mass extinction of large mammals left a significant ecological legacy, from shifting vegetation and fire regimes to changes in nutrient cycling and biogeochemistry...
Article
Full-text available
Human population has exponentially grown since the last glaciation, especially across temperate areas with easy access to water sources, excluding mammal species from their former habitats. Thus, we anticipate a change in environmental niche preferences for temperature and precipitation as increased human population forces mammal species into more...
Article
Full-text available
A major focus in evolutionary biology is to understand how the evolution of organisms relates to changes in their physical environment. In the terrestrial realm, the interrelationships among climate, vegetation, and herbivores lie at the heart of this question. Here we introduce and test a scoring scheme for functional traits present on the worn su...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how ecological communities are organized and how they change through time is critical to predicting the effects of climate change. Recent work documenting the co-occurrence structure of modern communities found that most significant species pairs co-occur less frequently than would be expected by chance. However, little is known about...
Article
Full-text available
Comparisons between modern death assemblages and their source communities have demonstrated fidelity to species diversity across a variety of environments and taxonomic groups. However, differential species preservation and collection (including body-size bias) in both modern and fossil death assemblages may still skew the representation of other i...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental conditions, dispersal lags, and interactions among species are major factors structuring communities through time and across space. Ecologists have emphasized the importance of biotic interactions in determining local patterns of species association. In contrast, abiotic limits, dispersal limitation, and historical factors have common...
Article
Full-text available
Kenya is a world leader in conservation and host to one of the most diverse array of mammals on the planet. As a focus of scientific attention, it is important to be able to assess not only the current state of Kenya's mammal communities, but also how they have changed over anthropogenic timescales. Comprehensive lists of mammal species from known...
Article
Full-text available
The potential for large-scale biodiversity losses as a result of climate change and human impact presents major challenges for ecology and conservation science. Governments around the world have established national parks and wildlife reserves to help protect biodiversity, but there are few studies on the long-term consequences of this strategy. We...
Article
Full-text available
The three species of Acris (cricket frogs) have experienced widespread declines in the northern portions of their ranges in the eastern United States since the middle of the 20th Century. In A. blanchardi and A. crepitans, these declines have been observed for decades but remain unexplained. The recently discovered decline of A. gryllus in North Ca...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background/Question/Methods It is commonly assumed that global biodiversity is in decline because of the increasing impact of anthropogenic influences, especially habitat loss. To mitigate habitat loss, many countries with biodiversity hotspots have attempted to preserve these by establishing protected areas where anthropogenic disturbances are m...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
The goal of this project is to quantify the effect of disturbances on co-occurrence networks across various spatial and temporal scales and across various taxa. For instance, we are examining the response of mammal community assembly to the Pleistocene extinctions and the response of bat and bird assemblages to habitat disturbance in the Neotropics. In time, co-occurrence networks may be used to monitor assemblages before more drastic changes such as beta diversity loss and irreversible changes like extinction come to pass.