Angus A. Thompson

Angus A. Thompson
Australian Institute of Marine Science · A Healthy and Resilient GBR Program

Bachelor of Science

About

63
Publications
16,849
Reads
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1,630
Citations
Introduction

Publications

Publications (63)
Preprint
Full-text available
Ocean warming is increasing the incidence, scale, and severity of global-scale coral bleaching and mortality, culminating in the third global coral bleaching event that occurred during record marine heatwaves of 2014-2017. While local effects of these events have been widely reported, the global implications remain unknown. Analysis of 15,066 reef...
Article
Cumulative impacts assessments on marine ecosystems have been hindered by the difficulty of collecting environmental data and identifying drivers of community dynamics beyond local scales. On coral reefs, an additional challenge is to disentangle the relative influence of multiple drivers that operate at different stages of coral ontogeny. We integ...
Article
The world's coral reefs are under threat as climate change causes increases in frequency and severity of acute thermal stress. This is compounded by chronic pressures including rises in sea surface temperature, overfishing and decline in water quality. Monitoring to understand the recovery dynamics of corals is paramount to enable effective managem...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This project synthesizes and refines the carbonate budget produced for the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) in Wolfe et al. (2019). Here, we present robust methodological advances to facilitate the calculation of carbonate budgets for the GBR, including: 1. The first method to quantify carbonate budgets using percent-cover data, alleviating the requirement...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The 2020 Gladstone Harbour Report Card reports on the environmental health of 13 reporting zones in and around Gladstone Harbour and the overall Environmental, Social, Cultural and Economic health of the harbour. This report card covers environmental monitoring undertaken in the period 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020 and environmental, social, cultural...
Article
Full-text available
Coral bleaching, cyclones, outbreaks of crown-of-thorns seastar, and reduced water quality (WQ) threaten the health and resilience of coral reefs. The cumulative impacts from multiple acute and chronic stressors on "reef State" (i.e., total coral cover) and "reef Performance" (i.e., the deviation from expected rate of total coral cover increase) ha...
Article
Full-text available
Cumulative impacts assessments on marine ecosystems have been hindered by the difficulty of collecting environmental data and identifying drivers of community dynamics beyond local scales. On coral reefs, an additional challenge is to disentangle the relative influence of multiple drivers that operate at different stages of coral ontogeny. We integ...
Article
Full-text available
Coral reef management is increasingly focused on supporting the resilience of coral communities to increasing and cumulative pressures. The coral index provides a concise summary of coral community resilience that can be efficiently communicated to a range of management and policy stakeholders. We detail the development of the index both as a techn...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This technical report is the fifth annual report card of the Gladstone Healthy Harbour Partnership (GHHP). The 2019 Gladstone Harbour Report Card contains the results calculated using 33 indicators derived from 108 different measures within the four components of harbour health: Environment, Economic, Social, and Cultural. For further details visit...
Article
Full-text available
Seawater acidification from increasing CO2 is often enhanced in coastal waters due to elevated nutrients and sedimentation. Our understanding of the effects of ocean and coastal acidification on present‐day ecosystems is limited. Here we use data from three independent large‐scale reef monitoring programs to assess coral reef responses associated w...
Article
Coral reefs have been heavily affected by elevated sea-surface temperature (SST) and coral bleaching since the late 1980s; however, until recently coastal reefs of north-western Australia have been relatively unaffected compared to Timor Sea and eastern Australian reefs. We compare SST time series with changes in coral cover spanning a period of up...
Article
Full-text available
Coral reefs are under increasing pressure from a variety of stressors, highlighting the need for information about the status of coral reef communities including the distribution, abundance and composition of juvenile and adult coral assemblages. This information is currently limited for the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and is necessary for understandi...
Article
Full-text available
In the face of increasing cumulative effects from human and natural disturbances, sustaining coral reefs will require a deeper understanding of the drivers of coral resilience in space and time. Here we develop a high‐resolution, spatially explicit model of coral dynamics on Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR). Our model accounts for biological, e...
Article
Full-text available
Changes in coral reef health and status are commonly reported using hard coral cover, however such changes may also lead to substantial shifts in coral community composition. Here we assess the extent to which coral communities departed from their pre-disturbance composition following disturbance (disassembly), and reassembled during recovery (reas...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The 2018 Gladstone Harbour Report Card reports on the environmental health of 13 reporting zones in and around Gladstone Harbour and the overall environmental, social, cultural and economic health of the harbour. This report card covers monitoring undertaken in the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018.
Article
Full-text available
Recovery of coral reefs after disturbance relies heavily on replenishment through successful larval settlement and their subsequent survival. As part of an integrated study to determine the potential effects of water quality changes on the resilience of inshore coral communities, scleractinian coral settlement was monitored between 2006 and 2012 at...
Data
Tile deployment periods at each study reef. The date of the Full Moons during the main spawning season was used to estimate the number of tile conditioning days (C) before competency of settlement of Acroporidae larvae (assumed to be 10 days post-full moon [42]), with the total number of tile deployment days (D) before collection. For years with tw...
Data
Average cover of adult Acroparidae (%) reported for each reef and each year of study. For each reef the annual estimate of average Acroporidae cover is given. In addition, the mean, standard deviation and standard error are given. The principle reefs studied are in bold. The other locations on the list are neighboring reefs where monitoring is cond...
Data
Tile conditioning in days and the average % CCA cover on recovered tiles. Where C = the maximum conditioning period from deployment to +10 days post 2nd (or 3rd if applicable) moon during spawning season, and cover of CCA (%) is an indicator of the level of exposure of coral larvae to CCA among reefs and years. (DOCX)
Data
Distribution of crustose coralline algae (CCA) on settlement tile surfaces. Mean cover of CCA (%), from estimated CCA cover on each settlement surface (Top, Bottom, Edge) from each tile for each year at each reef. (XLSX)
Data
Determining the time of spawning and the deployment duration of settlement tiles. (DOCX)
Data
Distribution of Acroporidae spat on settlement tile surfaces. Total Acroporidae per surface (Top, Bottom, Edge), and the proportion of Acroporidae spat on each surface for each year at each reef. (XLSX)
Data
Family groups of spat reported for each reef and each year of study. For each reef the annual totals for Acroporidae, Poritidae, Pocilloporidae, Isopora, Fungiidae, and undifferentiated spat are listed. For each taxonomic group, the total across the study period and the percentage representation is given. In addition, the mean, standard deviation,...
Article
Understanding the dynamics of habitat-forming organisms is fundamental to managing natural ecosystems. Most studies of coral reef dynamics have focused on clear-water systems though corals inhabit many turbid regions. Here, we illustrate the key drivers of an inshore coral reef ecosystem using 10 years of biological, environmental, and disturbance...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Building on the 2016 report card, the Gladstone Harbour Report Card 2017 has been informed by 99 measures of the four components of harbour health: environmental, social, cultural and economic. This report card is based on data collected during the period from July 2016 to June 2017. As GHHP continues to expand and refine its monitoring programs, a...
Article
Full-text available
Decreasing coral cover on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) may provide opportunities for rapid growth and expansion of other taxa. The bioeroding sponges Cliona spp. are strong competitors for space and may take advantage of coral bleaching, damage, and mortality. Benthic surveys of the inshore GBR (2005–2014) revealed that the percent cover of the mos...
Article
Climate change threatens coral reefs across the world. Intense bleaching has caused dramatic coral mortality in many tropical regions in recent decades, but less obvious chronic effects of temperature and other stressors can be equally threatening to the long-term persistence of diverse coral-dominated reef systems. Coral reefs persist if coral rec...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The 2016 Gladstone Harbour Report Card reports on the environmental health of 13 reporting zones in and around Gladstone Harbour and the overall environmental, social, cultural and economic health of the harbour. This report card covers monitoring undertaken in the period 1 July 2015 to 30 June 2016. The report can be downloaded using the following...
Article
Full-text available
River runoffand associated flood plumes (hereafter river plumes) are a major source of land-sourced contaminants to the marine environment, and are a significant threat to coastal and marine ecosystems worldwide. Remote sensing monitoring products have been developed to map the spatial extent, composition and frequency of occurrence of river plumes...
Article
Full-text available
A five-year period (2002–2006) of below-median rainfall followed by a six-year period (2007–2012) of above-median rainfall and seasonal flooding allowed a natural experiment into the effects of runoff on the water quality and subsequent coral community responses in the Whitsunday Islands, Great Barrier Reef (Australia). Satellite-derived water qual...
Article
Full-text available
The decline of marine water quality associated with terrestrial runoff from the adjacent catchments is a major cause of the current poor state of many of the key marine ecosystems of the Great Barrier Reef. Great Barrier Reef marine ecosystems and their associated catchments are part of a dynamic, interconnected system. Activities within the catchm...
Article
Full-text available
Responses of bioindicator candidates for water quality were quantified in two studies on inshore coral reefs of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). In Study 1, 33 of the 38 investigated candidate indicators (including coral physiology, benthos composition, coral recruitment, macrobioeroder densities and FORAM index) showed significant relationships with...
Article
Land-use changes and associated deteriorations in water quality are cited as major drivers of marine ecosystem change, and can modify community abundance and diversity on coral reefs. This study uses palaeoecological data derived from a mid-Holocene age coral reef in the Wet Tropics region of Australia's Great Barrier Reef to develop a record of co...
Article
Full-text available
Although the debate about coral reef decline focuses on global disturbances (e.g., increasing temperatures and acidification), local stressors (nutrient runoff and overfishing) continue to affect reef health and resilience. The effectiveness of foraminiferal and hard-coral assemblages as indicators of changes in water quality was assessed on 27 ins...
Article
Full-text available
The dynamic nature of coral communities can make it difficult to judge whether a reef system is resilient to the current disturbance regime. To address this question of resilience for near-shore coral communities of the Great Barrier Reef (Australia) a data set consisting of 350 annual observations of benthic community change was compiled from exis...
Article
We investigated spatial patterns of synchrony among coral reef fish populations and environmental variables over an eight-year period on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Our aims were to determine the spatial scale of intra- and interspecific synchrony of fluctuations in abundance of nine damselfish species (genus Pomacentrus) and assess whether...
Article
Ecological and environmental monitoring has become increasingly important, with increasing threats from human disturbances. Monitoring usually involves sampling from several sites of a similar habitat at regular (or irregular) intervals through time. The purpose of monitoring is to determine where and when an impact may have occurred or, once detec...
Article
Full-text available
Many sampling strategies have been proposed as appropriate for describing spatial patterns in marine organisms. There remain, however, many problems with the description, analysis and interpretation of temporal variation in abundances of organisms. In particular, there is a need to understand temporal error in the estimation of abundance of mobile...
Article
Full-text available
We compared fish count data derived simultaneously from visual censuses of transects of different width for a wide range of species on 3 coral reefs within the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. The relationships of count data from non-pomacentrid families between transects 10 and 5 m wide and pomacentrid genera between transects 2 and 1 m wide were fo...
Article
Full-text available
Visual survey techniques are used widely to estimate abundances of target organisms in terrestrial and aquatic environments. There are a number of methodological 'errors' in almost all applications of visual surveys. Given the dependence of all visual survey data on the skill and technique of the observer, one potentially important source of imprec...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Broad-scale monitoring of reef health on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) showed a widespread loss of hard coral cover from reefs in the southern Capricorn-Bunker Group that was coincident with a La Nina (anti El Nino) episode throughout 1988-89. The losses from the windward slopes of three reefs (One Tree, Fitzroy and lady Musgrave) were able to be qu...
Article
Two series of outbreaks of the crown-of-thorns starfish, Acanthaster planci (L.), have been recorded on the Great Barrier Reef since the early 1960s. Data from scientific surveys and reliable unpublished observations were analysed statistically to quantify the pattern of movement of these outbreaks. Data on outbreak populations were obtained from 8...
Article
This paper synthesises information from the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) Long Term Monitoring Project (LTMP), which involves making annual visits to about 50 reefs from north of Cooktown to the Capricorn-Bunker Group. Visual censuses of fish assemblages on reef fronts show clear cross-shelf differences at the family level and some...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I have run models with and without the strata argument and get the same result. The inclusion of strata does not appear to alter the model matrix.
Worried, I ran the example supplied in the functions help file (below) and found the same problem: both models give identical results and model matrices.
### Correct hypothesis test (with strata)
adonis(Y ~ NO3, data=dat, strata=dat$field, perm=999)
### Incorrect (no strata)
adonis(Y ~ NO3, data=dat, perm=999)
Am I missing something simple?

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
1. governance 2. bleaching impacts 3. fisheries and MPA management 4. Herbivory