Angus Atkinson

Angus Atkinson
Plymouth Marine Laboratory | PML · Marine Life Support Systems Research Area

About

198
Publications
56,979
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
11,594
Citations
Citations since 2017
65 Research Items
5142 Citations
201720182019202020212022202302004006008001,000
201720182019202020212022202302004006008001,000
201720182019202020212022202302004006008001,000
201720182019202020212022202302004006008001,000
Introduction
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
January 2012 - present
Plymouth Marine Laboratory
Position
  • Head of Plankton ecology group

Publications

Publications (198)
Article
Full-text available
With rapid, sector‐specific climatic changes impacting the Southern Ocean, we need circumpolar‐scale biomass data of its plankton taxa to improve food web models, blue carbon budgets and resource management. Here, we provide a new dataset on mesozooplankton biomass with 2909 records spanning the last 90 yr, and describe, in comparable carbon units,...
Article
Full-text available
In the Southern Ocean, several zooplankton taxonomic groups, euphausiids, copepods, salps and pteropods, are notable because of their biomass and abundance and their roles in maintaining food webs and ecosystem structure and function, including the provision of globally important ecosystem services. These groups are consumers of microbes, primary a...
Article
Full-text available
Poleward range shifts are a global-scale response to warming, but these vary greatly among taxa and are hard to predict for individual species, localized regions or over shorter (years to decadal) timescales. Moving poleward might be easier in the Arctic than in the Southern Ocean, where evidence for range shifts is sparse and contradictory. Here,...
Article
Full-text available
Plankton form the base of the marine food web and are sensitive indicators of environmental change. Plankton time series are therefore an essential part of monitoring progress towards global biodiversity goals, such as the Convention on Biological Diversity Aichi Targets, and for informing ecosystem-based policy, such as the EU Marine Strategy Fram...
Article
Body size is a fundamental trait in ecology, and body size reduction with increasing temperature has been termed the third universal response to climate warming. Although effects of temperature and food on phenotypic plasticity of zooplankton adult body size have been investigated, density‐dependent effects have been neglected. We measured seasonal...
Preprint
Full-text available
Plankton form the base of the marine food web and are sensitive indicators of environmental change. Plankton time-series are therefore an essential part of monitoring progress towards global biodiversity goals, such as the Convention on Biological Diversity Aichi Targets, and for informing ecosystem-based policy, such as the EU Marine Strategy Fram...
Article
Full-text available
In the North Atlantic, euphausiids (krill) form a major link between primary production and predators including commercially exploited fish. This basin is warming very rapidly, with species expected to shift northwards following their thermal tolerances. Here we show, however, that there has been a 50% decline in surface krill abundance over the la...
Article
Full-text available
The Barents Sea is a hotspot for environmental change due to its rapid warming, and information on dietary preferences of zooplankton is crucial to better understand the impacts of these changes on food-web dynamics. We combined lipid-based trophic marker approaches, namely analysis of fatty acids (FAs), highly branched isoprenoids (HBIs) and stero...
Article
Antarctic krill ( Euphausia superba, hereafter ‘krill’) exemplify the methodological challenges of studying small, mobile, aggregating pelagic organisms. 1 • Nicol S. • Brierley A.S. Through a glass less darkly – new approaches for studying the distribution, abundance and biology of Euphausiids. Deep Sea Res. II. 2010; 57 : 496-507 • Crossref •...
Article
Zooplankton phenological shifts may affect energy transfer through pelagic food web and up to fisheries, but few studies have compared zooplankton phenology across a wide latitudinal range of water temperatures. We examined the phenological variations of zooplankton at four sites along a latitudinal gradient from the Bay of Biscay [Bilbao and Urdai...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated diets of 24 Barents Sea zooplankton taxa to understand pelagic food-web processes during late summer, including the importance of sea ice algae-produced carbon. This was achieved by combining insights derived from multiple and complementary trophic marker approaches to construct individual aspects of feeding. Specifically, we determ...
Article
Full-text available
Zooplankton monitoring in shelf seas predominantly uses nets that miss the benthic boundary layer (BBL) just above the seabed. However, this boundary between pelagic and benthic assemblages can be faunistically rich, having its own distinct hyperbenthic fauna and acting as a low-light refuge for overwintering or dielly migrating zooplankton. To com...
Article
Climate warming has caused the seasonal timing of many components of ecological food chains to advance. In the context of trophic interactions, the match–mismatch hypothesis postulates that differential shifts can lead to phenological asynchrony with negative impacts for consumers. However, at present there has been no consistent analysis of the li...
Article
Full-text available
Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba, supports a valuable commercial fishery in the Southwest Atlantic, which holds the highest krill densities and is warming rapidly. The krill catch is increasing, is concentrated in a small area, and has shifted seasonally from summer to autumn/winter. The fishery is managed by the Commission for the Conservation o...
Article
Full-text available
Size-spectral approaches quantify the efficiency of energy transfer through food webs, but theory and field studies disagree over how changes in temperature, nutrients, and extreme weather impact on this efficiency. We address this at two scales: via 6 years of weekly sampling of the plankton size spectrum at the Plymouth L4 shelf sea site, and via...
Article
Full-text available
The Southern Ocean provides strong contrasts in rates and directions of change in temperature and sea ice between its sectors, but it is unknown how these affect plankton species that are distributed right around Antarctica. Here, we quantify the changing circumpolar distributions of Antarctic krill, based on the CHINARE 2013/14 circum-Antarctic ex...
Article
Full-text available
Theory and observations suggest that low frequency variation in marine plankton populations, or red noise, may arise through cumulative integration of white noise atmospheric forcing by the ocean and its amplification within food webs. Here, we revisit evidence for the integration of stochastic atmospheric variations by comparing the power spectra...
Article
Full-text available
Continental margins are disproportionally important for global primary production, fisheries and CO 2 uptake. However, across the Northeast Atlantic shelves, there has been an ongoing summertime decline of key biota-large diatoms, dinoflagellates and copepods-that traditionally fuel higher tropic levels such as fish, sea birds and marine mammals. H...
Article
Full-text available
Antarctic krill inhabit areas of the Southern Ocean that can exceed 4.0C, yet they preferentially inhabit regions with temperatures of �1.5 to 1.5C. Successful embryonic development and hatching are key to their life cycle, but despite the rapid climatic warming seen across their main spawning areas, the effects of elevated temperatures on embryoge...
Preprint
Climate warming has caused the seasonal timing of many components of ecological food chains to advance (Thackeray et al. 2010, 2016). In the context of trophic interactions the match-mismatch hypothesis (MMH) postulates that differential shifts can lead to phenological asynchrony with negative impacts for consumers (Cushing 1990). However, it is st...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing direct human pressures on the marine environment, coupled with climate‐driven changes, is a concern to marine ecosystems globally. This requires the development and monitoring of ecosystem indicators for effective management and adaptation planning. Plankton lifeforms (broad functional groups) are sensitive indicators of marine environme...
Article
Full-text available
There has been an overall decline in copepod populations across the North Atlantic over the past few decades. Reasons for these declines are unclear, and several major species, including the cyclopoid copepod Oithona similis, have maintained stable populations at station L4 in the western English Channel. To identify the factors contributing to thi...
Article
Full-text available
Extensive changes in plankton ecosystems around the British Isles over the last 60 years, including production, biodiversity and species distributions, have had effects on fisheries production and other marine life. This has been mainly driven by climate variability and ocean warming. These changes include: • Extensive changes in the planktonic eco...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
Eastern boundary upwelling systems (EBUS) are highly productive and climatically sensitive ecosystems of the ocean. A critical component sustaining EBUS is the zooplankton secondary production (ZSP) which links primary production (PP) and the higher trophic levels. However, estimating ZSP is a complex task and many questions remain regarding its co...
Article
Full-text available
Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) are swarming, oceanic crustaceans, up to two inches long, and best known as prey for whales and penguins – but they have another important role. With their large size, high biomass and daily vertical migrations they transport and transform essential nutrients, stimulate primary productivity and influence the carb...
Article
Full-text available
Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba, have a circumpolar distribution but are concentrated within the south-west Atlantic sector, where they support a unique food web and a commercial fishery. Within this sector, our first goal was to produce quantitative distribution maps of all six ontogenetic life stages of krill (eggs, nauplii plus metanauplii, c...
Article
Full-text available
The vertical migration of zooplankton and micronekton (hereafter ‘zooplankton’) has ramifications throughout the food web. Here, we present the first evidence that climate fluctuations affect the vertical migration of zooplankton in the Southern Ocean, based on multi-year acoustic backscatter data from one of the deep troughs in the Amundsen Sea, A...
Article
Contribution of latitude, distance offshore and environmental factors to variations in zooplankton assemblages across the Northeast Atlantic Shelves Province, fromthe Bay of Biscay [Bilbao 35 (B35) andUrdaibai 35 (U35)] to the English Channel (Plymouth L4; L4) and the North Sea (Stonehaven; SH), were assessed mainly by redundancy analysis. For coar...
Article
Full-text available
Warming of the Antarctic Peninsula in the latter half of the twentieth century was greater than any other terrestrial environment in the Southern Hemisphere, and clear cryospheric and biological consequences have been observed. Under a global 1.5◦C scenario, warming in the Antarctic Peninsula is likely to increase the number of days above 0◦C, with...
Article
Plankton are sensitive indicators of change and, at the base of marine food webs, they underpin important ecosystem services such as carbon sequestration and fisheries production. In the UK and the Northeast Atlantic region, change in plankton functional groups, or ‘lifeforms’, constructed based on biological traits, is the formally accepted policy...
Article
Full-text available
Macroalgae drive the largest CO 2 flux fixed globally by marine macrophytes. Most of the resulting biomass is exported through the coastal ocean as detritus and yet almost no field measurements have verified its potential net sequestration in marine sediments. This gap limits the scope for the inclusion of macroalgae within blue carbon schemes that...
Article
Full-text available
Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba Dana, 1850) exemplifies the key role of marine crustaceans in fisheries, foodwebs, and biogeochemical cycles. Ecological understanding and policy decisions require information on population trends. We have therefore worked with international colleagues to publish KRILLBASE, a database of fishery-independent krill...
Article
Full-text available
Impermanence is an ecological principle¹ but there are times when changes occur nonlinearly as abrupt community shifts (ACSs) that transform the ecosystem state and the goods and services it provides². Here, we present a model based on niche theory³ to explain and predict ACSs at the global scale. We test our model using 14 multi-decadal time serie...
Article
Full-text available
The biological carbon pump drives a flux of particulate organic carbon (POC) through the ocean and affects atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide. Short term, episodic flux events are hard to capture with current observational techniques and may thus be underrepresented in POC flux estimates. We model the potential hidden flux of POC originating from...
Article
Full-text available
High-latitude ecosystems are among the fastest warming on the planet¹. Polar species may be sensitive to warming and ice loss, but data are scarce and evidence is conflicting2–4. Here, we show that, within their main population centre in the southwest Atlantic sector, the distribution of Euphausia superba (hereafter, ‘krill’) has contracted southwa...
Article
There has been an upsurge of interest in trait-based approaches to zooplankton, modelling the seasonal changes in the feeding modes of zooplankton in relation to phytoplankton traits such as size or motility. We examined this link at two English Channel plankton monitoring sites south of Plymouth (L4 and E1). At L4 there was a general transition fr...
Article
The Plymouth L4 time plankton series in the Western English Channel is a textbook example of a shallow, stratifying shelf sea system. Over its 30 yr of weekly sampling, this site has provided a diverse and contrasting suite of numerical and conceptual models of plankton bloom formation, phenology, and seasonal succession. The most recent of these p...
Article
Full-text available
The island of South Georgia is situated in the iron (Fe)-depleted Antarctic Circumpolar Current of the Southern Ocean. Iron emanating from its shelf system fuels large phytoplankton blooms downstream of the island, but the actual supply mechanisms are unclear. To address this, we present an inventory of Fe, manganese (Mn), and aluminium (Al) in she...
Article
Full-text available
The pelagic copepods Oithona similis and Calanus helgolandicus have overlapping geographic ranges, yet contrast in feeding mode, reproductive strategy and body size. We investigate how these contrasting traits influence the seasonality of copepod abundance and reproductive output under environmental variation, using time series data collected over...
Article
Full-text available
Sea ice affects primary production in polar regions in multiple ways. It can dampen water column productivity by reducing light or nutrient supply, provide a habitat for ice algae and condition the marginal ice zone (MIZ) for phytoplankton blooms on its seasonal retreat. The relative importance of three different carbon sources (sea ice derived, se...
Article
There has been an upsurge of interest in trait-based approaches to zooplankton, modelling the seasonal changes in the feeding modes of zooplankton in relation to phytoplankton traits such as size or motility. We examined this link at two English Channel plankton monitoring sites south of Plymouth (L4 and E1). At L4 there was a general transition fr...
Article
Full-text available
Zooplankton on continental shelves represent an important intermediary in the transfer of energy and matter from phytoplankton to the wider ecosystem. Their taxonomic composition and trophic interactions with phytoplankton vary in space and time, and interpreting the implications of this constantly evolving landscape remains a major challenge. Here...
Article
Full-text available
Coccolithophores are key components of phytoplankton communities, exerting a critical impact on the global carbon cycle and the Earth’s climate through the production of coccoliths made of calcium carbonate (calcite) and bioactive gases. Microzooplankton grazing is an important mortality factor in coccolithophore blooms, however little is currently...
Article
Zooplankton seasonality and its environmental drivers were studied at four coastal sites within the Northeast Atlantic Shelves Province (Bilbao35 (B35) and Urdaibai35 (U35) in the Bay of Biscay, Plymouth L4 (L4) in the English Channel and Stonehaven (SH) in the North Sea) using time series spanning 1999–2013. Seasonal community patterns were extrac...
Article
Full-text available
Sea ice affects primary production in polar regions in multiple ways. It can dampen water column productivity by reducing light or nutrient supply, it provides a habitat for ice algae and on its seasonal retreat can condition the marginal ice zone (MIZ) for phytoplankton blooms. The relative importance of three different carbon sources (ice-derived...
Article
Zooplankton abundance series (1999-2013) from the coastal sites of Bilbao 35 (B35), Urdaibai 35 (U35), Plymouth L4 (L4) and Stonehaven (SH), in the Northeast Atlantic were compared to assess differences in the magnitude of seasonal, interannual and residual scales of variability, and in patterns of seasonal and interannual variation in relation to...
Article
Full-text available
Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) play a central role in the food web of the Southern Ocean, forming a link between primary production and large predators. Krill produce large, faecal pellets (FP) which can form a large component of mesopelagic particulate organic carbon (POC) fluxes. However, the patchy distribution of krill swarms, highly varia...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The multimetric approach is a methodological tool which can be used to study a range of systems, including GES assessment of marine waters. Three indicators (PH1, PH2 and PH3) are currently being developed in the frame of the OSPAR convention for the pelagic habitat component. The three PH indicators provide information on different and complementa...
Article
Full-text available
Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) and salps are major macroplankton contributors to Southern Ocean food webs and krill are also fished commercially. Managing this fishery sustainably, against a backdrop of rapid regional climate change, requires information on distribution and time trends. Many data on the abundance of both taxa have been obtaine...
Article
The near-surface layer of the ocean is a habitat in which plankton are subjected to very different stresses to those in deeper layers. These include high turbulence and illumination, allowing increased visibility to predators, and exposure to harmful UV radiation. To provide insights into stress caused by UV, we examined the occurrence of protectiv...
Article
Zooplankton vary widely in carbon percentage (carbon mass as a percentage of wet mass), but are often described as either gelatinous or non-gelatinous. Here we update datasets of carbon percentage and growth rate to investigate whether carbon percentage is a continuous trait, and whether its inclusion improves zooplankton growth models. We found th...