Angelos Lengeris

Angelos Lengeris
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | uoa · Department of Linguistics

PhD University College London

About

30
Publications
13,500
Reads
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250
Citations
Citations since 2017
4 Research Items
161 Citations
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201720182019202020212022202305101520253035
201720182019202020212022202305101520253035
201720182019202020212022202305101520253035
Additional affiliations
March 2012 - March 2015
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Position
  • GSRT Postdoctoral Fellow
September 2004 - December 2009
University College London
Position
  • MA, PhD

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
To become fluent in a second language, learners need to acquire a large vocabulary. However, the cognitive and affective mechanisms that support word learning, particularly among second language learners, are only beginning to be understood. Prior research has focused on intentional learning and small artificial lexicons. In the current study inves...
Article
Full-text available
The current study examined the effectiveness of computer-based auditory training on Greek speakers' production of English vowels in read sentences and in spontaneous speech. Another group of Greek speakers served as controls. Improvement was evaluated pre- and post-training via an identification task performed by English listeners and by an acousti...
Chapter
Full-text available
Stress and accent are central, organizing features of grammar, but their precise nature continues to be a source of mystery and wonder. These issues come to the forefront in acquisition, where the tension between the abstract mental representations and the concrete physical manifestations of stress and accent is deeply reflected. Understanding the...
Article
Full-text available
This study compared the perception-production vowel spaces for speakers of Standard Modern Greek and two regional dialects. In experiment 1, participants produced the Greek vowels and chose vowel best exemplars (prototypes) in a natural sentence spoken in the participants' dialect. In experiment 2, the speakers who had made the recordings for exper...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined native language (L1) transfer effects on the production of second-language (L2) prosody by intermediate Greek learners of English, specifically the set of tonal events and their alignment, speech rate, pitch span and pitch level in English polar questions. Greek uses an L* L+H- L% melody giving rise to a low–high–low f0 contour...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Within the AM model of intonational phonology, nuclear rather than prenuclear pitch accents typically monopolize our interest as the purported pivots for meaning distinctions among utterances. This paper compares, through one production and two perception experiments, the prenuclear field in statements versus polar questions in Greek, which can be...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study examined cross-dialectal differences on the perception of Greek vowels. Speakers of Standard Modern Greek (SMG) and two dialectal areas (Crete, Kozani), all with five vowels in their systems, chose best exemplar locations (prototypes) for Greek vowels embedded in a carrier sentence spoken by a speaker of their dialect. The results showed...
Article
Full-text available
The present study employed high-variability phonetic training (multiple words spoken by multiple talkers) to improve the identification of English consonants by native speakers of Greek. The trainees completed five sessions of identification training with feedback for seven English consonants (contrasting voiced vs. voiceless stops and alveolar vs....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study investigated English consonant identification by Greek listeners and the role of phonological short-term memory (PSTM) in listeners' identification ability. Twenty Greek university students who had received formal instruction in English identified 24 English consonants (embedded in VCV syllables) presented in quiet and in two noise types...
Thesis
Full-text available
Adults often have difficulty in acquiring non-native vowels especially when the vowel inventories in first (L1) and second language (L2) are very different. However, even when testing L2 groups with similar profiles, there are great individual differences in the perception and production of non-native sounds. Similarly, computer-based training stud...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study examined the allophonic realization of the lateral approximant /l/ as a rhotic sound, specifically a retroflex [ ł] in the Western Cretan dialect. Conversational speech data were collected from five villages. The results confirmed that the retroflex allophone occured before back vowels, usually in non prominent prosodic positions, i.e. m...
Chapter
Full-text available
Despite the well-attested importance of prosody in second language (L2) learning and the development of widely accessible software packages that can be used for analysing the prosodic aspects of speech, the teaching of L2 prosody is usually neglected in classroom settings. This article reviews important findings from L2 speech perception and produc...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study examined phonetic vowel reduction in Standard Modern Greek by comparing the spectral and temporal characteristics of the five Greek vowels spoken by the same speakers in two speaking styles, namely conversational and read speech. Frequencies of the first two formants (F1 and F2) and duration were measured and the Euclidean distance fr...
Chapter
Full-text available
Despite the well-attested importance of prosody in second language (L2) learning and the development of widely accessible software packages that can be used for analysing the prosodic aspects of speech, the teaching of L2 prosody is usually neglected in classroom settings. This article reviews important findings from L2 speech perception and produc...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study examined the production of English intonation by Greek second-language (L2) learners of English, specifically their production of polar questions and their pitch range in English. Productions of (a) comparable materials in Greek spoken by the same Greek speakers and (b) English materials spoken by native English speakers were used to ass...
Article
Full-text available
The perception and production of nonnative phones in second language (L2) learners can be improved via auditory training, but L2 learning is often characterized by large differences in performance across individuals. This study examined whether success in learning L2 vowels, via five sessions of high-variability phonetic training, related to the le...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the extent to which previous experience with duration in first language (L1) vowel distinctions affects the use of duration when perceiving vowels in a second language (L2). Native speakers of Greek (where duration is not used to differentiate vowels) and Japanese (where vowels are distinguished by duration) first identified and...
Article
Individuals may differ in their ability to learn the sounds of a second language (L2), but the origin of this variability remains uncertain. The present study examined whether individual differences in L2 vowel processing are related to individual differences in L1 vowel andor nonspeech processing. Greek learners of English were given a large batte...
Article
Several studies have shown that high-variability auditory training can improve the perception of second-language (L2) sounds by adult learners. However, even when testing a homogenous L2 group, considerable differences are commonly found between individuals not only in pre-training performance but also in how each trainee responds to training. Addi...
Article
Full-text available
This study compared the perception of Southern British English (SBE) vowels by Greek (Gr) and Japanese (J) learners of English, first using a cross-language mapping task to make predictions regarding SBE vowels' discriminability and then a categorial oddity discrimination task to test these predictions. Both G and J listeners have five vowel qualit...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Our project has three major aims: 1. To provide a comprehensive description and analysis of the vowel systems of six Modern Greek dialects at a phonetic and phonological level. To this end, we have recorded 10 speakers per dialect, 5 female and 5 male in a variety of speaking styles including (i) word lists, (ii) words embedded in a frame sentence, (iii) conversational spontaneous speech and (iv) narratives such as fairy tales. In total the recorded database contains approximately 120 hours of speech. This material is orthographically annotated. A small part of it is also phonetically annotated and there are acoustic, articulatory (electropalatographic) and perceptual analyses of a subset of the vowel data. All the materials are orthographically annotated and forced aligned and it is available to the research community. 2. To provide an updatable database and a glotto-geographic index that facilitates the presentation of collected data. It allows browsing through a dialect index, a sounds/phenomena index and an interactive map with multiple levels of detail. 3. To disseminate the findings to schools and universities with the aim to raise awareness of the existence, value and status of Modern Greek dialects. To this end, electronic educational materials have been designed for different levels of education.