Angélique Roquet

Angélique Roquet
University of Lausanne | UNIL ·  Institut de psychologie (IP)

PhD

About

14
Publications
2,043
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17
Citations
Introduction
My research aims to determine the psychological factors (social, cognitive, inter-cultural) that help older adults experience successful aging.

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
In early pandemic waves, when vaccination against COVID-19 was not yet an option, distancing and reduced social contact were the most effective measures to slow down the pandemic. Changes in frequency and forms of social contact have reduced the spread of the COVID-19 virus and thus saved lives, yet there is increasing evidence for negative side ef...
Article
Full-text available
The present study brings evidence of a new type of emotional processes, namely sequential modulations of emotional effects, and how these processes change during aging. Sequential modulations of emotional effects refer to the changes in emotional effects (i.e., differences in performance between current negative and positive items) as a function of...
Article
Full-text available
Objective. This study investigated how Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) affects numerosity estimation abilities (e.g., finding the approximate number of items in a collection). Method. Across two experiments, performance from HOA (i.e., Healthy Older Adults; N=48) and AD patients (N=50) was compared on dot comparison tasks. Participants were presented wit...
Method
Full-text available
Vous avez entre 18 et 100 ans et vous avez du temps libre ? Venez participer à notre étude de psychologie qui s'intéresse à l’effet des émotions sur nos capacités de détection ! L’équipe de Patrick Lemaire, Professeur à Aix-Marseille Université et Chercheur en Psychologie Cognitive (CNRS) vous propose de l'aider en participant à l'une de leurs rech...
Article
The present research aimed at determining (a) whether participants modulate executive control processes from one item to the next when they accomplish numerosity comparison tasks, and (b) how these modulations change across the lifespan. We tested sequential modulations of congruency effects in participants of different age groups. Sequential modul...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated strategies used by young and older adults in dot comparison tasks to further our understanding of mechanisms underlying numerosity discrimination and age-related differences therein. The participants were shown a series of two dot collections and asked to select the largest collection. Analyses of verbal protocols collected on each...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated age-related changes in the neural bases of sequential strategy interference. Sequential strategy interference refers to decreased strategy interference (i.e., poorer performance when the cued strategy is not the best) after executing a poorer strategy relative to after a better strategy. Young and older adults performed a co...
Presentation
Numerosity estimation has been found to crucially involve domain-general (e.g., inhibition) and domain-specific (e.g., numerical) processes. The present study brings evidence of a new type of domain-general processes, namely sequential modulations of executive control processes. Young and older adults were asked to accomplish a dot comparison task...
Method
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Expérience de psychologie cognitive sur internet: Se référer au document attaché.
Presentation
Full-text available
Pour accomplir de nombreuses tâches cognitives, les adultes ont recours à plusieurs stratégies. Le vieillissement cognitif est associé à des variations stratégiques provoquant des modifications des performances cognitives. Cependant, certains adultes présentent une préservation des capacités cognitives tandis que d’autres présentent un déclin impor...
Presentation
Full-text available
Young and older adults use several strategies to accomplish most cognitive tasks, and aging effects on human cognition are associated with strategic variations. In a previous study, Lemaire and Hinault (2014) found important individual differences among older adults in sequential modulations of strategy interference effects (i.e., smaller interfere...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
The present research aims at determining (a) whether effects of emotions on cognitive performance are sequentially modulated, such that differences in performance between negative and positive-emotion conditions on a given trial are modulated by emotions on the immediately preceding trial, and (b) how such sequential modulations change with aging. We will carry out two experiments to test sequential modulations of effects of emotions on cognitive performance for current trials and age-related differences therein. In Experiment 1, we will determine whether young and older adults modulate effects of emotions on cognitive performance across successive trials. These so-called sequential modulations of effects of emotions (SMEE) will be tested in a detection task (i.e., participants will detect the presence or absence of humans in emotionally positive or negative pictures). In Experiment 2, we will test the hypothesis that engagement and disengagement mechanisms are key responsible mechanisms for SMEE.