Angela L Ridgel

Angela L Ridgel
Kent State University | KSU · School of Health Sciences

PhD

About

69
Publications
9,470
Reads
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1,337
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2008 - present
Kent State University
March 2006 - March 2008
Cleveland Clinic
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2001 - March 2006
Case Western Reserve University
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (69)
Article
Full-text available
High-cadence dynamic cycling improves motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), such as tremor and bradykinesia. However, some participants experience greater benefits than others. To gain insight into how individual characteristics and cycling performance affects functional changes, data from two previous studies were used to build several preli...
Article
Full-text available
Dance therapy can improve motor skills, balance, posture, and gait in people diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and healthy older adults (OA). It is not clear how specific movement patterns during dance promote these benefits. The purpose of this cohort study was to identify differences and complexity in dance movement patterns among different...
Article
Previous exercise studies in individuals with motor neuron disease have shown some positive benefits but the stress of regular exercise could result in overuse weakness in this population. The purpose of this case study is to determine the efficacy, and tolerability of a high-cadence dynamic cycling intervention in an individual with motor neuron d...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Our objective was to design an eccentric bicycle design to elicit delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Methods: To assess the bicycle designs' ability to elicit DOMS, fourteen, recreationally active, males performed five-minutes of eccentric bicycling at 50% of their individualized power determined from a modified six-second Winga...
Article
The goal of this study was to examine if motor timing training alters the variability of the upper extremity movement during the golf putt. To improve motor timing, we utilised Interactive Metronome (IM), a software program that is designed to improve the rhythm and timing of intrinsic movements. Twenty participants who were registered in the Korea...
Article
Dance comprises a broad range of techniques and styles, which have been utilized in classes specifically designed for individuals with Parkinson‘s disease (PD) and healthy older adults (OA). Previous studies have shown that a series of dance sessions can improve balance, posture, and gait for people diagnosed with PD and healthy older adults. Howev...
Article
Accurate motor timing is required to produce well-coordinated movements during the golf swing. We developed the Interactive Metronome protocol, which included golf swing mechanics to improve motor timing. Thirty golfers were recruited into a category based on their experience: (a) professionals who qualified to play in the Professional golf tournam...
Article
Objectives To investigate cerebral perfusion as a potential mechanism of exercise-related cognitive improvements and to further associate cognition and cerebral perfusion in Parkinson's disease. Equipment and methods Cerebral perfusion was measured continuously at rest and during a cognitive task using near-infrared spectroscopy before and after a...
Article
Full-text available
The objective was to investigate if high cadence cycling altered non-motor cognition and depression symptoms in individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and whether exercise responses were influenced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism. Individuals with idiopathic PD who were ≥50 years old and free of surgical procedu...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Exercise has been shown to be an important adjunct therapy to medication in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the optimal type, frequency, and intensity of exercise or physiotherapy are still being debated. An important part of understanding the optimal frequency is to examine how acute bouts of exercise affect motor function and mo...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Despite the demonstrated benefits of exercise in multiple sclerosis (MS), this population shows low rates of physical activity. Understanding barriers to exercise in persons with MS is important. The current study examined the relationship between lifetime history of depression, current depressive symptoms, and aerobic endurance in per...
Patent
Full-text available
A system for use in rehabilitation of a target patient is provided. The system includes at least two bicycle devices for use by the target patient and a second operator other than the target patient. The at least two bicycle devices each include pedals. At least one of the pedals may have at least one sensor mounted thereon for monitoring operation...
Article
Full-text available
Background Depression is common in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and exercise is known to improve depression and PD. However, lack of motivation and low self-efficacy can make exercise difficult for people with PD and comorbid depression (PD-Dep). A combined group exercise and chronic disease self-management (CDSM) program may improve the l...
Article
To assess and validate the Smart Exercise Bike designed for Parkinson's Disease (PD) rehabilitation, forty-seven individuals with PD were randomly assigned to either the static or dynamic cycling group, and completed three sessions of exercise. Heart rate, cadence and power data were captured and recorded for each patient during exercise. Motor fun...
Article
Introduction: Studies in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) have suggested that the rate of exercise performance is important in treatment efficacy and neuroprotection. In humans with PD, lower-extremity forced-exercise (FE) produced global improvements in motor symptoms based on clinical ratings and biomechanical measures of upper extremit...
Data
Supplemental Figure. CONSORT Diagram. Two individuals dropped out of EXCEED group (one immediately before starting due to unrelated health concerns and another after 2 weeks due to time commitment problems) before they completed the intervention. One individual withdrew from the study after completing the intervention and did not participate in fol...
Article
Full-text available
The investigation examined the value of a multifaceted exercise intervention on body composition and strength, in those diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease (PD). 8 males subjects diagnosed with PD (69.13 ± 6.20 years) completed a previously introduced, 8-week, 24-session exercise intervention. A repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonst...
Article
Full-text available
Rationale: Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) often have deficits in kinesthesia. There is a need for rehabilitation interventions that improve these kinesthetic deficits. Forced (tandem) cycling at a high cadence improves motor function. However, tandem cycling is difficult to implement in a rehabilitation setting. Objective: To construc...
Article
Exposure to hypoxia is associated with cognitive impairment, mediated by cerebral deoxygenation. This can be problematic for individuals who perform mental tasks at high altitude. Eight healthy men completed two experimental trials consisting of 5 hours of exposure to normobaric hypoxia (12.5% O2). In one of the experimental trials (Hypoxia) subjec...
Article
Full-text available
Exercise can improve motor function in people with Parkinson's disease but depression reduces the motivation to participate in regular exercise. The aim of this study was to develop a novel Enhanced Exercise Therapy program that uses manual-driven guided exercise and peer-facilitated psychoeducation for individuals with Parkinson's disease and depr...
Article
We describe a novel device and method for real-time measurement of lingual-palatal pressure and automatic identification of the oral transfer phase of deglutition. Clinical measurement of the oral transport phase of swallowing is a complicated process requiring either placement of obstructive sensors or sitting within a fluoroscope or articulograph...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent studies along with applied experiments have proved the relationship between forced or active-assisted exercise (tandem cycling) and improvement in motor function of Parkinson’s decease (PD) patients. With the assistance of a trainer, patients pedaled at a rate 30% greater than their preferred voluntary rate. A good replacement for a trainer...
Article
With a substantial increase in diagnosed Parkinson's disease, it is of great importance to examine tolerance and physical measures of evolving exercise interventions. Of particular importance, a multifaceted exercise intervention combining active-assisted cycling and resistance training to older adults diagnosed with Parkinson's disease is being as...
Article
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurological disorder which often results in joint rigidity, bradykinesia and decreased range of motion (ROM). Segmental biomechanical muscle stimulation (BMS) can increase ROM in healthy young adults. However, acute effects on ROM in PD have not been examined. To examine whether BMS and active-assisted cycling (AAC) o...
Article
Full-text available
Variability in severity and progression of Parkinsons disease symptoms makes it challenging to design therapy interventions that provide maximal benefit. Previous studies showed that forced cycling, at greater pedaling rates, results in greater improvements in motor function than voluntary cycling. The precise mechanism for differences in function...
Article
Objectives: To develop a rapid cadence cycling intervention (active-assisted cycling [AAC]) using a motorized bike and to examine physiological perimeters during these sessions in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). A secondary goal was to examine whether a single session of AAC at a high cadence would promote improvements in tremor and bra...
Article
Previous studies have shown that single bouts of high-rate active cycling (> 80 rpm) improve upper extremity motor function in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). It is unknown if passive leg cycling produces a similar effect on upper extremity function. This article examines whether passive leg cycling can promote immediate changes in upper...
Article
Full-text available
Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) often experience cognitive declines. Although pharmacologic therapies are helpful in treating motor deficits in PD, they do not appear to be effective for cognitive complications. Acute bouts of moderate aerobic exercise have been shown to improve cognitive function in healthy adults. However, individuals w...
Article
Full-text available
Animal studies indicate forced exercise (FE) improves overall motor function in Parkinsonian rodents. Global improvements in motor function following voluntary exercise (VE) are not widely reported in human Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of VE and FE on PD symptoms, motor function, and bimanual d...
Article
The central complex (CC) is a group of midline neuropils in the protocerebrum of all insects (Williams, J Zool, 176:67-86, 1975; Strausfeld, Prog Brain Res, 123:273-284, 1999). Its columnar organization coupled with the anatomical tracts to and from this region suggests that the CC may supervise various forms of locomotion. In cockroach, lesions of...
Article
Full-text available
This article describes the effect of a robotic device combined with repetitive-task practice (RTP) on upper-extremity function in a patient with chronic stroke. The client was a 32-year-old woman, 11 months after stroke, with minimal wrist and finger movement. She received approximately 48 hr of intervention split evenly between a robotic device (H...
Article
Legged locomotion has evolved as the most effective form of movement through unpredictable and tortuous environments. Upon encountering an obstacle, an animal must evaluate the object with its sense organs then use the information it acquires to direct appropriate transitional behaviors, such as turning. Previous studies using genetic and surgical...
Article
Full-text available
Few studies in arthropods have documented to what extent local control centers in the thorax can support locomotion in absence of inputs from head ganglia. Posture, walking, and leg motor activity was examined in cockroaches with lesions of neck or circumoesophageal connectives. Early in recovery, cockroaches with neck lesions had hyper-extended po...
Article
Full-text available
Unlike intact animals, cockroaches with bilateral circumoesophageal connective lesions have difficulty climbing up smooth inclines. Typically, they slipped badly or even fell over backward before traveling more than 1.5 body lengths up the incline. The major problem involves increased slippage of the front and sometimes middle legs. Periods of fron...
Article
Full-text available
Locomotor deficits frequently accompany aging in animals. These deficits are often caused by degeneration in the nervous and musculoskeletal systems. Insects are an excellent model for age-related behavior studies because they are short-lived and have a reduced nervous system with fewer cells than vertebrates. Furthermore, they are highly mobile an...
Article
Full-text available
Aging is often associated with locomotor deficits. Behavior in aged Blaberus discoidalis cockroaches was analyzed during horizontal walking, climbing, righting and inclined walking. Adult animals showed a decrease in spontaneous locomotion with increasing age. Tarsal abnormalities, termed 'tarsus catch', were often present in aged individuals. In '...
Article
Full-text available
Aging is often associated with locomotor deficits. Behavior in aged Blaberus discoidalis cockroaches was analyzed during horizontal walking, climbing, righting and inclined walking. Adult animals showed a decrease in spontaneous locomotion with increasing age. Tarsal abnormalities, termed `tarsus catch', were often present in aged individuals. In `...
Article
All animals generate progressively larger forces as they increase in size and mass. Their abilities to detect these forces must be similarly adjusted. In insects, campaniform sensilla monitor strains in the exoskeleton and provide information about forces acting upon the legs. Each sensory neuron possesses a dendrite that inserts into a cuticular c...
Article
Responses of the tibial campaniform sensilla, receptors that encode strains in the exoskeleton, were characterized by recording sensory activities during perturbations in freely standing cockroaches. The substrate upon which the animal stood was displaced horizontally using ramp and hold stimuli at varied rates. The sensilla showed short latency re...
Article
Forces exerted by a leg in support and propulsion can vary considerably when animals stand upon or traverse irregular terrains. We characterized the responses of the cockroach tibial campaniform sensilla, mechanoreceptors which encode force via strains produced in the exoskeleton, by applying forces to the leg at controlled magnitudes and rates. We...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to detect changes in load is important for effective use of a leg in posture and locomotion. While a number of limb receptors have been shown to encode increases in load, few afferents have been demonstrated to signal leg unloading, which occurs cyclically during walking and is indicative of slipping or perturbations. We applied mechani...
Article
A major problem in sensory motor integration is to delineate how forces acting upon a leg are encoded and regulated in the control of posture and locomotion. We have studied responses of the trochanteral campaniform sensilla, the largest array of force detecting mechanoreceptors in the cockroach leg. Afferents from two groups of sensilla (Groups 3...

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