Angela Meadows

Angela Meadows
The University of Western Ontario | UWO · Department of Psychology

BSc Adv Hons, MSc, PhD

About

36
Publications
8,054
Reads
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607
Citations
Introduction
I am completing a PhD in Psychology at the University of Birmingham in the UK. Specifically, I am interested in the effects of experienced and internalised weight stigma and their impact on health behaviours and health outcomes. I am also interested in the role of group identity in explaining why some people internalise societal weight stigma whereas others actively resist or challenge their devalued status. Oh, and I founded the International Weight Stigma Conference back in 2013.
Additional affiliations
October 2015 - present
University of Birmingham
Position
  • Academic Writing Skills mentorship programme
Description
  • Designated writing skills mentor for the College of Life and Environmental Sciences. I mentored students from health, medicine, and biosciences on a one-to-one basis across a range of academic writing and studying skills.
March 2014 - present
Various
Position
  • Visiting lecturer
Description
  • I have presented lectures and workshops on weight stigma on a number of undergraduate and graduate courses across a range of healthcare disciplines.
January 2013 - June 2014
University of Birmingham, UK
Position
  • Postgraduate Teaching Assistant
Description
  • Practical workshops in undergraduate statistics and research methods.
Education
November 2012 - September 2016
University of Birmingham
Field of study
  • Psychology
September 2009 - September 2012
University of Chester
Field of study
  • Weight Management
September 2004 - May 2006
Birkbeck, University of London
Field of study
  • Science Communication

Publications

Publications (36)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Obese individuals face increasing levels of prejudice and discrimination across many spheres of daily life. In addition, some individuals internalise society’s anti-fat attitudes and stereotypes. Both internalised and societal stigma have been associated with poorer health outcomes, independent of BMI. In this study, 379 overweight or obese adult...
Article
Environments that are hostile to one or more marginalized groups are known to have a negative effect on the mental health and well-being of both targets and observers. Anti-fat attitudes have been well documented in medical education, including the use of derogatory humor and discriminatory treatment toward higher-weight patients. However, to date,...
Article
Scholars have proposed that cumulative experiences of anti-fat bias and stigma contribute to detrimental physical activity experiences, as well as social and health inequities. The objective of this research was to explore how enacted weight stigma experiences are constructed and impact women’s physical activity experiences long term. Eighteen wome...
Article
Full-text available
Objective Weight stigma is prevalent across multiple life domains, and negatively affects both psychological and physical health. Yet, research into weight stigma reduction techniques is limited, and rarely results in reduced antipathy toward higher-weight individuals. The current pre-registered study investigated a novel weight stigma reduction in...
Article
The present study examined how weight status would affect lay perceptions of a White female student presenting signs of eating disorder-related distress. We recruited a mixed-gender, weight-diverse U.S. community sample through Mechanical Turk (N = 130; 49.2% female) to complete an online survey. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two co...
Article
Few jurisdictions provide legal protection against discrimination on the basis of weight despite evidence of pervasive inequalities faced by fat individuals in employment, healthcare, education, and other domains. Yet, in the last two decades, advocacy efforts in several countries aimed to remedy this situation have been largely unsuccessful. We pr...
Article
Food addiction is associated with elevated levels of eating pathology, body image concerns, and internalized weight stigma. The role of internalized weight stigma in the progression of addictive-like eating has not been explored. This longitudinal study explored the relative contributions of weight-related self-devaluation and fear of being stigmat...
Article
Weight stigma and discrimination have been linked to negative health outcomes. Most research on this topic is retrospective, which may not accurately capture day-to-day experiences. The current used ecological momentary assessment to examine weight stigma and discrimination in everyday life. Participants answered ecological momentary assessments ab...
Article
Internalized weight stigma (IWS) has been linked with disordered eating behavior, both directly, and as a mediator of the relationship between experienced weight stigma and maladaptive coping. However, the construct of IWS is highly correlated with the related constructs of body image and global self-esteem, and the three constructs may better be r...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This paper was written to help advance convergence-oriented research in the hazards and disaster field. It highlights areas where additional research could contribute new knowledge to the response to and recovery from the pandemic and other disasters yet to come. This Working Group brings together a multi-disciplinary team of 19 experts in academia...
Article
Full-text available
A considerable body of evidence links internalised weight stigma with higher levels of disordered eating behaviour and cognitions in both normative- and higher-weight populations. However, to date, the impact of internalised weight stigma on objectively measured food intake has not been explored. In the present study, a weight-diverse sample of 158...
Article
Full-text available
Background Internalized weight stigma (IWS) is generally operationalized as self-devaluation due to weight in higher-weight individuals. The most commonly used measure of IWS, the Weight Bias Internalization Scale (WBIS), was developed from an original pool of 19 items. Item selection was guided by statistical techniques based upon an a priori hypo...
Article
Weight stigma is pervasive in the US, with body size being pathologised and weight loss urged for those of higher weights. However, there is a growing movement for fat acceptance and body positivity. The present study explored perceptions and experiences of cultural body acceptance trends among Midwestern American women who are trying to, or have t...
Article
Full-text available
Sizeism permeates and shapes how scientific and professional communities—including therapists—perceive, understand, and behave toward anyone considered fat. In this article, we use scientific evidence to argue for the recognition and establishment of fat acceptance to subvert sizeism. We first critically review the Weight Normative Approach, which...
Article
Full-text available
An inverse relationship has been observed between body mass index and physical activity levels. In the present article, we draw from a range of literatures to construct a novel, theoretical dual-pathway model that identifies direct and indirect impacts of societal weight stigma on exercise behavior. The direct pathway operates via experiences or th...
Chapter
Full-text available
Weight stigma is a form of social stigma that primarily targets higher-weight individuals in virtually every domain of daily living, and it is becoming the norm worldwide. In this chapter, we present an overview of the research linking weight stigma and body image, drawing upon evidence from cross-sectional, experimental, longitudinal, and interven...
Article
Food addiction is controversial within the scientific community. However many lay people consider themselves addicted to certain foods. We assessed the prevalence and characteristics of self-perceived "food addiction" and its relationship to a diagnostic measure of "clinical food addiction" in two samples: (1) 658 university students, and (2) 614 a...
Article
Full-text available
Anti-fat bias in healthcare providers and medical students has serious implications for quality of care of higher-weight patients. Studies of interventions aimed at reducing anti-fat attitudes in medical students have generally been disappointing, with little enduring effect. It is possible that some students may be more receptive to prejudice-redu...
Article
Objectives: To investigate the influence of internalized weight stigma (IWS) on physical activity (PA) outcomes among women with body mass index (BMI) over 30 kg/m2. Design and Method: Data were drawn from an RCT that included 80 primarily inactive women (94% non-Hispanic/Latina white; mean age=39.6, SD=4.1, range=30.0 to 45.0; mean BMI=38.0 kg/m2,...
Article
Full-text available
In 2015, the 3rd Annual International Weight Stigma Conference was held in Reykjavik, Iceland.1 One of the highly anticipated sessions of the 2-day event was a roundtable discussion on terminology used in weight stigma research and professional practice to describe higher-weight bodies and to identify best practice—how to engage in the conversation...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Severe allergic rhinitis uncontrolled by conventional medication can substantially affect quality of life. Immunotherapy involves administering increasing doses of a specific allergen, with the aim of reducing sensitivity and symptomatic reactions. Recent meta-analyses have concluded that both subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and subl...
Article
Background: Severe allergic rhinitis uncontrolled by pharmacotherapy can adversely affect quality of life. Both subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) have demonstrated effectiveness in this patient group; however, it remains uncertain which route of administration is more effective. Objectives: We sought to update...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Papers exploring the experiences of higher weight medical students and doctors.