Angela de Bruin

Angela de Bruin
The University of York · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

32
Publications
13,358
Reads
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1,354
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
September 2019 - present
The University of York
Position
  • Lecturer
October 2016 - August 2019
September 2013 - August 2016
The University of Edinburgh
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Bilinguals living in a bilingual society continuously need to choose one of their languages to communicate a message. Sometimes, the circumstances (e.g., the presence of a monolingual) dictate language choice. When surrounded by other bilinguals, however, the bilinguals themselves can often decide which language to use. While much previous research...
Article
Full-text available
We examined whether and how language produced by others influences self-language processes. This study addressed this issue by looking at effects of comprehension on language switching in cued and voluntary switching contexts. During voluntary language switching, Chinese-English bilinguals were more likely to repeat the language they previously use...
Article
Full-text available
The current longitudinal study investigated how classroom second language (L2) learning modulates the neural correlates of bilingual language control during language production. Chinese college freshmen majoring in English undertook two test sessions (i.e. pre-learning and post-learning) over the course of one year. Specifically, while in the scann...
Article
Full-text available
Learning new content and vocabulary in a foreign language can be particularly difficult. Yet, there are educational programs that require people to study in a language they are not native speakers of. For this reason, it is important to understand how these learning processes work and possibly differ from native language learning, as well as to dev...
Article
The current study examines how monolingual children and bilingual children with languages that are orthotactically similar and dissimilar learn novel words depending on their characteristics. We contrasted word learning for words that violate or respect the orthotactic legality of bilinguals’ languages investigating the impact of the similarity bet...
Article
Full-text available
How do bilingual readers of languages that have similar scripts identify a language switch? Recent behavioral and electroencephalographic results suggest that they rely on orthotactic cues to recognize the language of the words they read in ambiguous contexts. Previous research has shown that marked words with language-specific letter sequences (i....
Article
Full-text available
The neural mechanisms underlying one's own language production and the comprehension of language produced by other speakers in daily communication remain elusive. Here, we assessed how self‐language production and other‐language comprehension interact within a language switching context using event‐related functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (er‐...
Article
How bilinguals control their languages and switch between them may change across the life span. Furthermore, bilingual language control may depend on the demands imposed by the context. Across 2 experiments, we examined how Spanish-Basque children, teenagers, younger, and older adults switch between languages in voluntary and cued picture-naming ta...
Article
How do bilinguals freely switch languages in daily life (i.e., voluntary language switching)? Does this involve inhibition of cross-language interference, or does easier lexical access to specific words directly trigger switches to another language? To reveal the underlying mechanism of voluntary language switching, the current study applied transc...
Article
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Prior research has found reduced emotionality with foreign language use, especially with single words, but what happens if emotionality is conveyed throughout a longer text? Does emotionality affect how well we remember and associate information, that is, content learning? We played participants descriptions of two invented countries and tested how...
Article
How bilinguals switch between languages depends on the context. In a voluntary context, bilinguals are free to decide when to switch, whereas in a cued context they are instructed when to switch. While using two languages may be more costly than using one in cued switching ('mixing cost'), recent evidence suggests that voluntarily using two languag...
Article
Full-text available
No two bilinguals are the same. Differences in bilingual experiences can affect language-related processes but have also been proposed to modulate executive functioning. Recently, there has been an increased interest in studying individual differences between bilinguals, for example in terms of their age of acquisition, language proficiency, use, a...
Preprint
Full-text available
Bilinguals may be better than monolinguals at word learning due to their increased experience with language learning. In addition, bilinguals that have languages that are orthotactically different could be more used to dissimilar orthotactic patterns. The current study examines how bilinguals with languages that are orthotactically similar and diss...
Article
Can performing simple motor actions help people learn the meanings of words? Here we show that placing vocabulary flashcards in particular locations after studying them helps students learn the definitions of novel words with positive or negative emotional valence. After studying each card, participants placed it on one of two shelves (top or botto...
Article
Bilingual language switching has been studied extensively in cued picture naming paradigms, instructing bilinguals when to switch between languages. However, in daily life, bilinguals often switch freely, without external instruction. This study examined when and why bilinguals switch voluntarily. Spanish-Basque bilinguals frequently switched betwe...
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Full-text available
Multilinguals have to control their languages constantly to produce accurate verbal output. They have to inhibit possible lexical competitors not only from the target language, but also from non-target languages. Bilinguals’ training in inhibiting incongruent or irrelevant information has been used to endorse the so-called bilingual advantage in ex...
Preprint
Due to enduring experience of managing two languages, bilinguals have been argued to develop superior executive functioning compared to monolinguals. Despite extensive investigation, there is, however, no consensus regarding the existence of such a bilingual advantage. Here we synthesized comparisons of bilinguals’ and monolinguals’ performance in...
Article
Because of enduring experience of managing two languages, bilinguals have been argued to develop superior executive functioning compared with monolinguals. Despite extensive investigation, there is, however, no consensus regarding the existence of such a bilingual advantage. Here we synthesized comparisons of bilinguals’ and monolinguals’ performan...
Article
Older adults have been argued to have impoverished inhibitory control compared to younger adults. However, these effects of age may depend on processing speed and their manifestation may furthermore depend on the type of inhibitory control task that is used. We present two experiments that examine age effects on inhibition across three tasks: a Sim...
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Full-text available
The BEST dataset presents data from 650 adult participants from the Basque Country who completed a series of Basque, English, and Spanish language proficiency tests (hence the name BEST). The BEST dataset is the result of a collaborative project developed at the Basque Center on Cognition, Brain and Language (BCBL) with the aim of providing researc...
Article
Bilingualism has been associated with slower lexical processing in both languages, but it remains unclear to what extent this effect may be modulated by language use. We compared older English monolinguals with two groups of older bilinguals on lexical processing tasks. Both acquired English and Gaelic during childhood, but while active bilinguals...
Article
Studies on the neuroanatomical basis of bilingualism have yielded various but inconsistent differences between bilinguals and monolinguals. In this commentary, we will discuss how differences in background variables between language groups could explain part of this variation. We will furthermore argue that besides language proficiency and age of a...
Article
Full-text available
It is a widely held belief that bilinguals have an advantage over monolinguals in executive-control tasks, but is this what all studies actually demonstrate? The idea of a bilingual advantage may result from a publication bias favoring studies with positive results over studies with null or negative effects. To test this hypothesis, we looked at co...

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