Andy Skelton

Andy Skelton
Dickinson College · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

20
Publications
1,122
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,139
Citations
Citations since 2017
0 Research Items
106 Citations
20172018201920202021202220230510152025
20172018201920202021202220230510152025
20172018201920202021202220230510152025
20172018201920202021202220230510152025
Introduction
Andy Skelton worked at the Department of Psychology, Dickinson College. Andy did research in Applied Psychology, Quantitative Psychology and Social Psychology. Their most recent publication is 'How negative are attitudes toward persons with AIDS? Examining the AIDS-Leukemia paradigm'.

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Reports a meta-analysis of studies published between 1987 and 1996 (combined Ns ≈ 2100) comparing attitudes toward persons with AIDS versus Leukemia. The major goal was to iden- tify which attitude measures are most sensitive to variation in the target person's disease diag- nosis and sexual orientation. Diagnosis had moderate effects on measures o...
Article
Two studies examined the effects of telling lay perceivers about patients' n]onmedical problems. In Study 1, college students rated a male peer's report of a sore throat as less credible and more psychologically caused when these co-occurred with non-medical problems (midterm exams or insomnia), even when diagnostic results for strep throat were po...
Chapter
You listen as your spouse complains about a throbbing headache. A professor listens as a student cites a recent bout of flu to justify a request for an extended term paper deadline. A supervisor listens to an employee’s description of back pain that has reduced the employee’s productivity. In each case, a perceiver is presented with a report of a v...
Chapter
The role played by psychological, social, and cultural factors in human health and health-related behavior is hardly a new theme in the social and behavioral sciences. It is clear, however, that something new is happening in health-related social research. An important new line of theory and research can be traced, a line of work concerning basic q...
Book
How do individuals conceive illness and symptoms? Do their conceptions conflict with the physician's views of their illness, and what happens if they do? This book thoroughly explores the field of disease representation, describes and discusses lay illness models in a variety of social, histo- rical and cultural contexts.
Article
Two experiments showed that self-reports of physical symptom frequency increase after people make abstract decisions about health connotations of common words. In Experiment 1, scores on a standardized symptom frequency inventory were substantially higher among subjects who completed the inventory after the decision task than among subjects who com...
Article
This article is based on an experiment that examined features distinguishing chronic from acute pain syndromes, and their influence on nurses' estimates of patient suffering, pain relief actions, and attitudes toward patients. Two hundred sixty-eight nurses received one-paragraph descriptions of patients complaining of severe pain. Descriptions var...
Article
Seventy patients with chronic low-back pain not due to malignancy returned a questionnaire assessing functional status 5 years following treatment with epidural or subarachnoid nerve blocks. One hundred fifty-one patients had been surveyed 3 years earlier in an initial follow-up. The respondents to the present survey were older and more able to ben...
Article
Two experiments employed within-subject designs to assess the degree to which selected physical symptoms correlated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) fluctuations. In the first study, 30 normotensive undergraduates (15 male and 15 female) participated in a series of 20 tasks and 20 baseline sessions, each lasting 1–2 min. Following each task or ba...
Article
Two experiments demonstrated that the experience of physical sensations is the result of hypothesis-guided selective search and encoding. In the first experiment, subjects listened to a stimulus that was said to increase, decrease, or have no effect on skin temperature. The results indicated that subjects selectively monitored only those changes in...
Article
Three experiments (88 male and 36 female undergraduates) explored the effects of self-enhancement or self-deprecation on the actor's self-esteem as measured in a separate context. In Exp I, Ss were influenced, by observing others in a screening interview, to emulate their self-enhancing or self-deprecating behavior when they themselves were intervi...
Article
Two experiments demonstrated that the experience of physical sensations is the result of hypothesis-guided selective search and encoding. In Exp I with 38 undergraduates, Ss listened to a stimulus that was said to increase, decrease, or have no effect on skin temperature. Results indicate that Ss selectively monitored only those changes in skin tem...
Article
Full-text available
Physical symptoms such as headaches and back pains affect everyone from time to time. The present report addresses the nature of symptoms themselves and the psychological processes affecting their occurrence. The first section of the paper will present background information on the symptom-reporting process-- e.g., general frequency of symptom-repo...
Article
symptoms, the primary focus of this chapter, are usually measured via oral or written self-reports and thus exemplify verbal modes of responding / verbal measures can be used to obtain information about highly specific physical sensations (e.g., heart rate, tight stomach), emotional states (anger, guilt), or general characterization of physical sta...

Network

Cited By