Andrzej Oleksa

Andrzej Oleksa
Kazimierz Wielki University in Bydgoszcz · Department of Genetics

PhD

About

50
Publications
15,320
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742
Citations
Introduction
My main interest can be broadly described as ecology and conservation genetics. Currently, I am particularly interested in two research areas: (1) the conservation of native honeybee subspecies and (2) estimating dispersal abilities of organisms of conservation interest.
Additional affiliations
March 2015 - present
Kazimierz Wielki University in Bydgoszcz
Position
  • Associate proffesor
March 2003 - February 2015
Kazimierz Wielki University in Bydgoszcz
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (50)
Article
Full-text available
Several honey bee (Apis mellifera) subspecies are in danger of local extinction because their feral population have almost completely disappeared. An important threat to the feral populations of bees is loss of habitat and loss of woodlands. In many places the only habitat suitable for honey bee nesting are rows of trees along roadsides. We studied...
Article
Full-text available
Northern Poland is inhabited by native Apis mellifera mellifera (AMM) and the non-native A. m. carnica (AMC) which was introduced by beekeepers. However, hybrids between the two subspecies of honey bee are relatively rare. The lower than expected proportion of hybrids is hypothesised to be related to reproductive isolation between AMM and AMC. To v...
Article
Full-text available
Identification of honey bee (Apis mellifera) subspecies is important for their protection. It is also used by queen breeders to maintain some breeding lines. In this study, we compared three methods of subspecies identification based on the following: 17 microsatellite loci, COI-COII mitotypes and geometric morphometrics of forewing venation. The m...
Article
Full-text available
Carniolan honey bees (Apis mellifera carnica) are considered as an indigenous subspecies in Hungary adapted to most of the ecological and climatic conditions in this area. However, during the last decades Hungarian beekeepers have recognized morphological signs of the Italian honey bee (Apis mellifera ligustica). As the natural distribution of the...
Article
Full-text available
In Europe, protecting the genetic diversity of Apis mellifera is usually perceived in the context of limiting the spread of the evolutionary C-lineage within the original range of the M-lineage. However, due to climate change and large-scale ongoing movement of breeding individuals, the expansion of bees from the African A-lineage could represent a...
Article
Full-text available
In Morocco, there are two well-recognised honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) subspecies: A. m. intermissa in the north and A. m. sahariensis in the south-east. The latter subspecies is found in the arid and semiarid climates of the Sahara Desert. In this study, we used honey bees from four areas of south-eastern Morocco which are, to some degree, isolat...
Article
Full-text available
Socioeconomic interests and beekeeper preferences have often taken precedence over the conservation of locally native honey bee subspecies, leading to the predominance of admixture populations in human-dominated areas. To assess the genetic diversity of contemporary managed Serbian honey bee colonies, we used 14 microsatellite loci and analyzed 237...
Book
Full-text available
Wydawać by się mogło, że ochrona owadów niemających bezpośredniego znaczenia dla człowieka nie ma większego sensu, a generuje jedynie problemy poprzez narzucenie ograniczeń na szeroko pojęty rozwój gospodarczy. Tymczasem przyglądając się nieco bliżej temu zagadnieniu można zrozumieć głęboką potrzebę tego działania i możliwość pogodzenia interesów o...
Article
Full-text available
Obtaining biological material for DNA extraction is often challenging in organisms of conservation interest. Non-invasive sampling (i.e., sampling without injuring or disturbing an animal) is preferred as it carries no risk to the population’s survival. Here, we tested the possibility of using the body remains left by bird predators for microsatell...
Article
Individual differences in male reproductive success drive genetic drift and natural selection, altering genetic variation and phenotypic trait distributions in future generations. Therefore, identifying the determinants of reproductive success is important for understanding the ecology and evolution of plants. Here, based on the spatially‐explicit...
Article
Full-text available
During the Last Glacial Maximum in the northern Hemisphere, expanding ice sheets forced a large number of plants, including trees, to retreat from their primary distribution areas. Many host-associated herbivores migrated along with their host plants. Long-lasting geographic isolation between glacial refugia could have been led to the allopatric sp...
Article
Full-text available
The white stork Ciconia ciconia nest, with its impressive size of over 1.5 m in height, a diameter of over 1.5 m and weight exceeding a ton, belongs the largest and heaviest structures built by birds all over the world. This permanent construction which is made of long sticks laid in layers and the thick lining consisting of hay, straw, manure, rub...
Article
Full-text available
--- Background and Aims --- Dispersal is crucial due to its direct impact on dynamics of a species’ distribution as well as having a role in shaping adaptive potential through gene flow. In plants forming scarce and small populations, knowledge about the dispersal process is required to assess the potential for colonizing new habitats and connectiv...
Article
Full-text available
Introduced plants are often identified as the major conservation concern worldwide, however, they also may offer conservation benefits, among others, provide habitat and/or food resources to protected animals. Here we aimed to assess the ability of the great Capricorn beetle Cerambyx cerdo, a highly specialised species associated with mature oaks,...
Article
Full-text available
Eristalis pertinax varies seasonally, with the spring morph more hairy than the summer morph. We measured the size and the venation of the wings of the seasonal morphs. Wings of the spring morph were significantly larger than those of the summer morph and those of females were larger than those of males. There were also significant differences betw...
Data
Full-text available
Fourteen microsatellite loci are described for the eastern European hermit beetles, Osmoderma barnabita, a vulnerable and internationally protected species associated with mature hollow trees. Based on 45 individuals from Poland, 13 of 14 loci were polymorphic. The number of alleles per polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 13, and the observed and ex...
Data
Figure S1. Neighbour‐joining tree using Nei genetic distance.
Article
Full-text available
Understanding factors that limit gene flow through the landscape is crucial for conservation of organisms living in fragmented habitats. We analysed patterns of gene flow in Elater ferrugineus, an endangered click beetle living in old-growth, hollow trees in a network of rural avenues surrounded by inhospitable arable land. Using amplified fragment...
Article
Full-text available
Living in unstable habitats is expected to decrease the intensity of isolation by distance in popula-tions through the need for frequent movements of individuals. Insects associated with fruiting bodies of fungi therefore are supposed to have weak spatial genetic structure of populations com-pared with those living in more stable habitats. With the...
Article
Full-text available
Species confined to temporally stable habitats are usually susceptible to habitat fragmentation, as living in long-lasting habitats is predicted to constrain evolution of dispersal ability. In Europe, saproxylic invertebrates associated with tree hollows are currently threatened due to the severe fragmentation of their habitat, but data on the popu...
Article
Full-text available
In Europe honey bees are considered as domesticated animals. Beekeepers provide them with hives, feed them, protect against parasites and manage them extensively. However, the number of colonies in central and northern Europe is declining, Feral colonies of honey bees once present in Europe have also seen a sharp decline in recent years.
Article
Full-text available
Protecting populations in their natural habitat allows for the maintenance of naturally evolved adaptations and ecological relationships. However, the conservation of genetic resources often requires complementary practices like gene banks, translocations or reintroductions. In order to minimize inbreeding depression and maximize the adaptive poten...
Book
Full-text available
Dlaczego pachnica? Owad do niedawna mało znany. Jako pędrak przez kilka lat pędzi skryte życie we wnętrzu starego drzewa, tylko na kilka tygodni ujawniając się światu w postaci doskonałej – okazałego, pięknego chrząszcza. Ale pokazuje się niezbyt chętnie – niewielu widziało go na własne oczy. Tu jednak nie chodzi o samą tylko pachnicę, aczkolwiek j...
Article
Full-text available
Peripheral populations may be crucial for understanding processes underlying adaptive genetic variation. Their evolution and ecology are driven by various genetic and demographic processes, such as selection, gene flow and bottleneck. Peripheral populations often experience a reduction in density resulting in the Allee effect. The presence of inter...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat fragmentation can have severe genetic consequences for trees, such as increased inbreeding and decreased effective population size. In effect, local populations suffer from reduction of genetic variation, and thus loss of adaptive capacity, which consequently increases their risk of extinction. In Europe, Taxus baccata is among a number of...
Article
Full-text available
The genetic diversity of the north and western European subspecies of honey bee, Apis mellifera mellifera (the "dark bee") is severely endangered due to hybridization with introduced bees of evolutionary branch C. Genetic variability of native honey bees in the north-eastern part of Poland, including a special isolated breeding zone in the Augustow...
Article
Full-text available
Philaeus chrysops is a species of jumping-spiders associated with sparsely vegetated, stony and sandy habitats. Although its geographic distribution in Palearctic is wide, it is relatively rare and endangered outside the Mediterranean region. The species is threatened to extinction and it is included in the Red List of the Endangered Species in Pol...
Article
Hermit beetles of the genus Osmoderma (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae) are known for their fruity odour, which is released in large amounts by males. Two species of the genus occur in Europe, the eastern Osmoderma barnabita (Motschulsky) and the western Osmoderma eremita (Scopoli). Previous studies on Swedish populations of O. eremita showed...
Article
Full-text available
In plants, the magnitude of seed and pollen dispersal plays a pivotal role in shaping genetic structure of populations. Restricted dispersal of genes can stimulate the increase of inbreeding as well as spatial clustering of relatives. These phenomena are explained by the theory of isolation-by-distance. Because of its biology, European beech (Fagus...
Article
Full-text available
The occurrence of Ovalisia rutilans, an endangered beetle developing in lime trees, was studied in a network of rural avenues in northern Poland. We examined 2052 small-leaved lime trees (Tìlia cordata) planted along road verges. Among them, 32 trees (1.54%) were occupied by O. rutilans. The beetle preferred trees of worse health class. Trees plant...
Chapter
Full-text available
Th e hermit beetle Osmoderma eremita is an important fl agship species (or perhaps more likely, a complex of closely related species) for the conservation of biodiversity connected to environments rich in old, hollow trees. In recent years, studies on ecology and distribution of O. eremita were intensifi ed because of its signifi cance in the desig...
Article
Full-text available
The occurrence of Osmoderma eremita (Scopoli, 1763), an endangered species restricted to hollow trees, was studied in a network of rural avenues in northern Poland. We detected 1002 trees with hollows suitable for hermit beetle development (25% of all trees). Among them, 114 (11%) were occupied by O. eremita. The distribution of O. eremita was not...
Article
Full-text available
The occurrence of Protaetia lugubris, an endangered species developing in hollow trees, was studied in a network of rural avenues in northern Poland. We detected 1002 trees from nine species with hollows suitable for beetle development (25% of all trees inspected). Among them, 74 trees (7.4%) from seven species were occupied by P. lugubris. The dis...
Article
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A pselaphine species, Euplectus duponti Aubé, 1833, is reported for the first time to occur in Poland. Data concerning its general distribution and ecology are given. Characteristic morphological features of the species are discussed and illustrated.
Article
Full-text available
It is often assumed that the survival of saproxylic insects in agricultural landscapes hinges on migration from source forest refugees. We surveyed over one thousand km2 area in mixed forest and agricultural landscapes in NE Poland to examine the relationship between the occurrence of the saproxylic beetles Osmoderma eremita and Protaetia lugubris...
Article
Full-text available
The Pselaphinae beetle, Bibloplectus spinosus Raffray, 1914, is reported for the first time from Poland. General data on its distribution and ecology are given. Characteristic morphological features of the species are pointed out and compared with those of closely related species.
Chapter
Full-text available
Cranberry Fritillary is a tyrphobiotic butterfly,inhabiting peat bogs with Oxycoccus palustris, which is a food plant of its larvae. In many parts of Europe, excluding Scandinavia and North-Eastern Europe, it has isolated localities; in Poland the species only occurs in the northern, north-eastern and southeastern regions of the country and has bec...
Article
Full-text available
Rubus chamaemorus L. is a threatened species, strictly protected in Poland. Its distribution is restricted to Sudety Mts, Pomerania and Warmia and Mazury regions. The species was found in a new locality in NE Poland: Piłag near Morag, in a peat-bog pine wood. Whole population covers area of 0.5 ha, mean population density is 69.4 stems/m2 (SD 47.48...
Article
Full-text available
The Hermit beetle Osmoderma eremita (Scopoli, 1763)(Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) in Poland - occurrence, threats and protection: On the basis of published data, a survey of old collections, and field investigations conducted lately in some parts of Poland, the distribution of Osmoderma eremita and the current state of its population have been evaluat...
Article
Rubus chamaemorus L. is a threatened species, strictly protected in Poland. Its distribution is restricted to Sudety Mts, Pomerania and Warmia and Mazury regions. The species was found in a new locality in NE Poland: Piłag near Morag, in a peat-bog pine wood. Whole population covers area of 0.5 ha, mean population density is 69.4 stems/m2 (SD 47.48...
Article
Full-text available
Hermit beetles of the genus Osmoderma (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae) are known for their fruity odour, which is released in large amounts by males. Two species of the genus occur in Europe, the eastern Osmoderma barnabita (Motschulsky) and the western Osmoderma eremita (Scopoli). Previous studies on Swedish populations of O. eremita showed...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I am trying to estimate the most likely number ok K using MCMC (Markov Chain Monte-Carlo Inference Of Clusters From Genotype Data) function in Geneland R-package by Gilles Guillot et al. I am a lit bit confused when it comes to varnpop and freq.model arguments
In the package reference manual https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/Geneland/Geneland.pdf  one may read:
varnpop = TRUE *should not* be used in conjunction with freq.model = "Correlated"
From the other hand, other manual http://www2.imm.dtu.dk/~gigu/Geneland/Geneland-Doc.pdf recommends example of MCMC usage which looks like this:
MCMC(coordinates=coord, geno.dip.codom=geno, varnpop=TRUE, npopmax=10, spatial=TRUE, freq.model="Correlated", nit=100000, thinning=100, path.mcmc="./")
I am not sure how to reconcile these two contradictory pieces of information, any suggestions?

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Projects

Projects (6)
Project
Using genetic markers, this project aims to determine the scale and frequency of gene exchange through seeds and pollen between populations of common yew (Taxus baccata L.) scattered in the Western Carpathians, Poland. In addition, the project aims to verify whether i) the distance of seed dispersal depends on fecundity (i.e. the quality of the food base), and ii) there is a relationship between the dispersal of pollen and the elevation of the tree. The mathematical models of pollen and seed distribution developed in the project will be useful in predicting the gene flow between populations of the studied species, especially in areas exposed to rapid climate change.
Project
Bark beetles are considered major pests of coniferous trees in temperate zone, generating enormous economic loss to the forest sector globally. Dispersal abilities play crucial role in the population dynamic of bark beetles, as it allows for a range expansion and location of new host trees. Some bark beetle species can flight over dozens of kilometres, while their congeners disperse over only dozens of meters. There are also contrasting differences in dispersal potential within the species. Nevertheless, dispersal capacity in this group has been studied only in a few flagship species, and the drivers of between- and within species differences in this trait remain unknown. The goal of the project is to understand within- and between species differences in dispersal potential in bark beetles. For this reason, the flight-related morphology, which is the key trait related to dispersal, will be compared among large number of species and genera by using innovative approach, involving the geometric morphometrics, high-precision real time 3D measurements, flight experiments, and micro computed tomography. In the next step, we are going to investigate how the reproductive strategy, phylogeny, physical constraints, and trophic specialization affect the development of flight-related morphology in bark beetles, and how it influences the dispersal abilities, aggressiveness and the population dynamic of the studied species. We predict that the evolution of dispersal abilities in bark beetles, has been driven mostly by the reproductive strategy. Our study will shed new light on the origin and diversity of dispersal strategies of these harmful pests and help to create more accurate models of population dispersion and outbreak dynamic, which is crucial step to develop an effective management strategy.
Project
Our project is aimed at answering the question whether the Norway spruce range disjunction during Pleistocene affected the patterns of variation of its phytophagous fauna. Moreover, we would like to investigate if the Norway spruce colonization routes correspond to migration paths of its associated biota. For this purpose we going to use genetic markers (mitochondrial sequences and microsatellites) along with the morphological analysis based on hind wing geometric morphometrics. Our research may provide interesting insights into phylogeographic patterns of European fauna and could contribute to better understanding of young radiations.