Andrey Chetverikov

Andrey Chetverikov
Radboud University | RU · Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behaviour

PhD

About

80
Publications
14,331
Reads
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801
Citations
Citations since 2017
65 Research Items
751 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
Additional affiliations
July 2017 - present
Radboud University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2015 - June 2017
University of Iceland
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2015 - present

Publications

Publications (80)
Article
Serial dependence in vision reflects how perceptual decisions can be biased by what we have recently perceived. Serial dependence studies test single items' effects on perceptual decisions. However, our visual world contains multiple objects at any given moment, so it's important to understand how past experiences affect not only a single object bu...
Preprint
Full-text available
Transcranial ultrasonic stimulation (TUS) is rapidly emerging as a promising non-invasive neuromodulation technique. TUS is already well-established in animal models, and now stimulation protocols that optimize neuromodulatory efficacy for human application are required. One promising protocol, pulsed at 1000 Hz, has consistently resulted in motor...
Article
Full-text available
It is well known that observers can use so-called summary statistics of visual ensembles to simplify perceptual processing. The assumption has been that instead of representing feature distributions in detail the visual system extracts the mean and variance of visual ensembles. But recent evidence from implicit testing using a method called feature...
Article
Current theories of perception suggest that the brain represents features of the world as probability distributions, but can such uncertain foundations provide the basis for everyday vision? Perceiving objects and scenes requires knowing not just how features (e.g., colors) are distributed but also where they are and which other features they are c...
Article
Full-text available
Current theories of perception suggest that the brain represents features of the world as probability distributions, but can such uncertain foundations provide the basis for everyday vision? Perceiving objects and scenes requires knowing not just how features (e.g., colors) are distributed but also where they are and which other features they are c...
Preprint
Full-text available
Current theories of perception suggest that the brain represents features of the world as probability distributions, but can such uncertain foundations provide the basis for everyday vision? Perceiving objects and scenes requires knowing not just how features (e.g., colors) are distributed but also where they are and which other features they are c...
Preprint
Serial dependence in vision reflects how perceptual decisions can be biased by what we have recently perceived. Serial dependence studies test single items' effects on perceptual decisions. However, our visual world contains multiple objects at any given moment, so it's important to understand how past experiences affect not only a single object bu...
Preprint
Full-text available
Prominent theories of perception suggest that the brain builds probabilistic models of the world, assessing the statistics of the visual input to inform this construction. However, the evidence for this idea is often based on simple impoverished stimuli, and the results have often been discarded as an illusion reflecting simple "summary statistics"...
Article
Recent accounts of perception and cognition propose that the brain represents information probabilistically. While this assumption is common, empirical support for such probabilistic representations in perception has recently been criticized. Here, we evaluate these criticisms and present an account based on a recently developed psychophysical meth...
Article
Full-text available
Visual perception is, at any given moment, strongly influenced by its temporal context-what stimuli have recently been perceived and in what surroundings. We have previously shown that to-be-ignored items produce a bias upon subsequent perceptual decisions that acts in parallel with other biases induced by attended items. However, our previous inve...
Article
The visual system is sensitive to statistical properties of complex scenes and can encode feature probability distributions in detail. But does the brain use these statistics to build probabilistic models of the ever-changing visual input? To investigate this, we examined how observers temporally integrate two different orientation distributions fr...
Article
Full-text available
Although confidence is commonly believed to be an essential element in decision-making, it remains unclear what gives rise to one's sense of confidence. Recent Bayesian theories propose that confidence is computed, in part, from the degree of uncertainty in sensory evidence. Alternatively, observers can use physical properties of the stimulus as a...
Article
Full-text available
Bayesian predictive coding theories of autism spectrum disorder propose that impaired acquisition or a broader shape of prior probability distributions lies at the core of the condition. However, we still know very little about how probability distributions are learned and encoded by children, let alone children with autism. Here, we take advantage...
Article
Full-text available
Our senses provide us with a rich experience of a detailed visual world, yet the empirical results seem to suggest severe limitations on our ability to perceive and remember. In recent attempts to reconcile the contradiction between what is experienced and what can be reported, it has been argued that the visual world is condensed to a set of summa...
Preprint
Visual perception is, at any given moment, strongly influenced by its temporal context – what stimuli have recently been perceived and in what surroundings. We have previously shown that to-be-ignored items produce a bias upon subsequent perception that acts in parallel with other biases induced by attended items. However, our previous investigatio...
Preprint
Full-text available
Although confidence is commonly believed to be an essential element in decision making, it remains unclear what gives rise to one’s sense of confidence. Recent Bayesian theories propose that confidence is computed, in part, from the degree of uncertainty in sensory evidence. Alternatively, observers can use physical properties of the stimulus as a...
Article
Full-text available
Observers can learn complex statistical properties of visual ensembles, such as their probability distributions. Even though ensemble encoding is considered critical for peripheral vision, whether observers learn such distributions in the periphery has not been studied. Here, we used a visual search task to investigate how the shape of distractor d...
Article
Full-text available
We move our eyes roughly three times every second while searching complex scenes, but covert attention helps to guide where we allocate those overt fixations. Covert attention may be allocated reflexively or voluntarily, and speeds the rate of information processing at the attended location. Reducing access to covert attention hinders performance,...
Preprint
The visual system is sensitive to statistical properties of complex scenes and can encode feature probability distributions in detail. This encoding could reflect a passive process due to the visual system’s sensitivity to temporal perturbations in the input or a more active process of building probabilistic representations. To investigate this, we...
Article
Full-text available
Humans have remarkable abilities to construct a stable visual world from continuously changing input. There is increasing evidence that momentary visual input blends with previous input to preserve perceptual continuity. Most studies have shown that such influences can be traced to characteristics of the attended object at a given moment. Little is...
Preprint
Visual ensembles, like leaves on a tree, often share properties such as shape or color. Thisredundancy can be quantified as a feature probability distribution whose summary statistics (e.g.,mean) observers can report explicitly. Here, we show that such explicit reports underestimate therichness of ensemble perception. Participants (N=12 per conditi...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how people rate their confidence is critical for the characterization of a wide range of perceptual, memory, motor and cognitive processes. To enable the continued exploration of these processes, we created a large database of confidence studies spanning a broad set of paradigms, participant populations and fields of study. The data f...
Preprint
Full-text available
We move our eyes roughly three times every second while searching complex scenes, but covert attention helps to guide where we allocate those overt fixations. Covert attention may be allocated reflexively or voluntarily, and speeds the rate of information processing at the attended location. Reducing access to covert attention hinders performance,...
Article
Our interactions with the visual world are guided by attention and visual working memory. Things that we look for and those we ignore are stored as templates that reflect our goals and the tasks at hand. The nature of such templates has been widely debated. A recent proposal is that these templates can be thought of as probabilistic representations...
Preprint
Recent accounts of perception and cognition propose that the brain represents information probabilistically. While this assumption is common, empirical support for such probabilistic representations has recently been criticized. It has been argued that due to methodological limitations of perceptual experiments, probabilistic theories only provide...
Chapter
A recurring mistake is a tendency to repeat one’s mistake if the task includes repetitive actions with the same set of stimuli without feedback given. This phenomenon has been shown in a variety of cognitive tasks (Reber, 1989; Dienes and Scott, 2005; Allakhverdov, 1993). The possible mechanism of recurring errors should include not only a descript...
Preprint
Humans have remarkable abilities to construct a stable visual world from continuously changing input. There is increasing evidence that momentary visual input blends with previous input to preserve perceptual continuity. Most studies have shown that such influences can be traced to characteristics of the attended object at a given moment. Little is...
Preprint
Humans have remarkable abilities to construct a stable visual world from continuously changing input. There is increasing evidence that momentary visual input blends with previous input to preserve perceptual continuity. Most studies have shown that such influences can be traced to characteristics of the attended object at a given moment. Little is...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding how people rate their confidence is critical for characterizing a wide range of perceptual, memory, motor, and cognitive processes. However, progress has been slowed by the difficulty of collecting new data and the unavailability of existing data. To address this issue, we created a large database of confidence studies spanning a broa...
Article
Full-text available
Objects have a variety of different features that can be represented as probability distributions. Recent findings show that in addition to mean and variance, the visual system can also encode the shape of feature distributions for features like color or orientation. In an odd-one-out search task we investigated observers' ability to encode two fea...
Chapter
Full-text available
We discuss how priming of attention shifts has in recent studies proved to be a useful method for studying internal representations of visual ensembles. Attentional priming is very powerful in particular when role reversals between targets and distractors occur. Such role reversals can be used to assess how expected or unexpected a particular targe...
Chapter
Full-text available
A recurring mistake is a tendency to repeat one’s mistake if the task includes repetitive actions with the same set of stimuli without feedback given. This phenomenon has been shown in a variety of cognitive tasks (Reber, 1989; Dienes and Scott, 2005; Allakhverdov, 1993). The possible mechanism of recurring errors should include not only a descript...
Preprint
An extensive amount of research indicates that repeating target and distractor features facilitates pop-out search while switching these features slows the search. Following the seminal study by Maljkovic & Nakayama (1994), this ‘priming of pop-out’ effect (PoP) has been widely described as an automatic bottom-up process that is independent of the...
Article
Full-text available
An extensive amount of research indicates that repeating target and distractor features facilitates pop-out search while switching these features slows the search. Following the seminal study by Maljkovic and Nakayama (1994), this "priming of pop-out" effect (PoP) has been widely described as an automatic bottom-up process that is independent of th...
Article
Full-text available
People hiss and swear when they make errors, frown and swear again when they encounter conflicting information. Such error- and conflict-related signs of negative affect are found even when there is no time pressure or external reward and the task itself is very simple. Previous studies, however, provide inconsistent evidence regarding the affectiv...
Article
Full-text available
People often miss salient events that occur right in front of them. This phenomenon, known as change blindness, reveals the limits of visual awareness. Here, we investigate the role of implicit processing in change blindness using an approach that allows partial dissociation of covert and overt attention. Traditional gaze-contingent paradigms adapt...
Article
We disagree with Rahnev & Denison (R&D) that optimality should be abandoned altogether. Rather, we argue that adopting a normative approach enables researchers to test hypotheses about the brain's computational goals, avoids just-so explanations, and offers insights into function that are simply inaccessible to the alternatives proposed by R&D.
Preprint
Full-text available
Отчёт по результатам опроса «Какой электронный информационный ресурс нужен исследователям?». В опросе приняло участие 86 респондентов, большинство - исследователи в области когнитивных и психологических наук. Результаты включают информацию об использовании исследователями электронных информационных ресурсов (инструментов для обеспечения исследовани...
Article
Recent evidence suggests that observers can grasp patterns of feature variations in the environment with surprising efficiency. During visual search tasks where all distractors are randomly drawn from a certain distribution rather than all being homogeneous, observers are capable of learning highly complex statistical properties of distractor sets....
Article
Preferences are determined not only by stimuli themselves but also by the way they are processed in the brain. The efficacy of cognitive processing during previous interactions with stimuli is particularly important. When observers make errors in simple tasks such as visual search, recognition, or categorization, they later dislike the stimuli asso...
Article
Full-text available
Colors are rarely uniform, yet little is known about how people represent color distributions. We introduce a new method for studying color ensembles based on intertrial learning in visual search. Participants looked for an oddly colored diamond among diamonds with colors taken from either uniform or Gaussian color distributions. On test trials, th...
Poster
Full-text available
A large body of research has shown that pop-out search is facilitated by feature repetitions (priming of pop-out or PoP). A debated question is to what degree PoP is an automatic process. Our results show that PoP is governed both by passive effects of previous target features and observers’ expectations. Abstract: Imagine you are picking strawberr...
Poster
Full-text available
Teaser: Jaguars can have yellow and black spots, while birds can have many dominant colors. Can the visual system encode such multimodal feature distributions? Using a new approach based on priming of pop-out in visual search, we show that probabilistic visual representations can be at least bimodal. Abstract: Imagine a pile of black and white ball...
Article
Hulleman & Olivers' (H&O's) proposal is a refreshing addition to the visual search literature. Although we like their proposal that fixations, not individual items should be considered a fundamental unit in visual search, we point out some unresolved problems that their account will have to solve. Additionally, we consider predictions that can be m...
Poster
Full-text available
Real world objects have a variety of features with different probability distributions. A tree leaf can have a unimodal hue distribution in summer that changes to a bimodal one in autumn. We have previously shown that perceptual systems can learn not only summary statistics (mean or variance), but also distribution shapes (probability density funct...
Article
Full-text available
We recently demonstrated that observers are capable of encoding not only summary statistics, such as mean and variance of stimulus ensembles, but also the shape of the ensembles. Here, for the first time, we show the learning dynamics of this process, investigate the possible priors for the distribution shape, and demonstrate that observers are abl...
Chapter
Full-text available
What are the building blocks of our visual representations? Whatever we look at, the things we see will have some feature variability: even snow is not purely white but has a range of shades of white. However, in most studies investigating visual perception, homogeneous displays with all stimuli having a very limited range of features have been use...
Article
Observers can estimate summary statistics of visual ensembles, such as the mean or variance of distributions of color, orientation or motion. But attempts to show that the shape of feature distributions is accessible have not been successful. Using a novel "priming of pop-out" paradigm we show for the first time that observers encode not only means...
Article
Full-text available
Perception allows us to extract information about regularities in the environment. Observers can quickly determine summary statistics of a group of objects and detect outliers. The existing body of research has, however, not revealed how such ensemble representations develop over time. Moreover, the correspondence between the physical distribution...
Article
Full-text available
In the well-known "dress" photograph, people either see the dress as blue with black stripes or as white with golden stripes. We suggest that the perception of colors is guided by the scene interpretation and the inferred positions of light sources. We tested this hypothesis in two online studies using color matching to estimate the colors observer...
Article
Full-text available
A popular model of the function of selective visual attention involves search where a single target is to be found among distractors. For many scenarios, a more realistic model involves search for multiple targets of various types, since natural tasks typically do not involve a single target. Here we present results from a novel multiple-target for...
Article
A popular model of the function of visual attentional involves visual search where a single target is to be found among multiple distractors. A more realistic model may, however, arguably involve search for multiple targets of various types in the same search environment, since our goals at any one time may not necessarily be so narrow as to involv...
Article
Full-text available
The Internet provides a convenient environment for data collection in psychology. Modern Web programming languages, such as JavaScript or Flash (ActionScript), facilitate complex experiments without the necessity of experimenter presence. Yet there is always a question of how much noise is added due to the differences between the setups used by par...
Article
Full-text available
Repeating targets and distractors on consecutive visual search trials facilitates search performance, whereas switching targets and distractors harms search. In addition, search repetition leads to biases in free choice tasks, in that previously attended targets are more likely to be chosen than distractors. Another line of research has shown that...
Article
Full-text available
Even without explicit positive or negative reinforcement, experiences may influence preferences. According to the affective feedback in hypotheses testing account preferences are determined by the accuracy of hypotheses: correct hypotheses evoke positive affect, while incorrect ones evoke negative affect facilitating changes of hypotheses. Applying...
Article
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How do people understand that their perception is correct? In line with the recurring idea of perception as prediction, the affective feedback account of hypotheses testing suggests that correct perceptual predictions are reinforced with positive affect. In four experiments, we tested whether correct categorization of a degraded image will lead to...
Article
Full-text available
The present research aimed to assess the effect of recognition decision on subsequent affective evaluations of recognised and non-recognised objects. Consistent with the proposed account of post-decisional preferences, results showed that the effect of recognition on preferences depends upon objective familiarity. If stimuli are recognised, liking...

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