Andrew Womack

Andrew Womack
Furman University · Department of Asian Studies

Doctor of Philosophy

About

10
Publications
4,863
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32
Citations
Introduction
Andrew Womack is currently an Assistant Professor of Asian Studies and Anthropology at Furman University. His research focuses on using geophysical survey, excavation, and ceramic analysis to explore craft production, identity, and interaction in late Neolithic and early Bronze Age northwestern China. He is Associate Director of the Tao River Archaeology Project and the creator and editor of the China Ceramic Petrography Database.
Additional affiliations
August 2020 - present
Furman University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
August 2011 - December 2017
Yale University
Field of study
  • Anthropology

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
The Xindian culture of northwest China has been seen as a prototypical example of a transition toward pastoralism, resulting in part from environmental changes that started around 4000 years ago. To date, there has been little available residential data to document how and whether subsistence strategies and community organization in northwest China...
Article
Over the last decade, excavations at the late Neolithic to early Bronze Age site of Shimao in northern Shaanxi Province have transformed our understanding of the archaeology of early China. What was previously seen as an area that was peripheral to the development of early dynastic centers in northern China is now being heralded by some scholars as...
Book
Full-text available
https://www.barpublishing.com/painted-pottery-production-and-social-complexity-in-neolithic-northwest-china.html
Article
Full-text available
The transition between the Majiayao (5300–4000 BP) and Qijia (4200–3500 BP) “cultures” in what is now northwestern China’s Gansu Province has typically been defined by major technological changes in pottery forms, subsistence practices, and site locations. These changes are thought to have been driven by a combination of climate change induced cool...
Article
Full-text available
The Qijiaping site is a large-scale settlement of the Qijia culture located in the Tao river valley in Gansu. Our project team conducted a series of field walking survey, geo-physical survey, digital mapping, analysis of collected survey artifacts, and targeted excavation at the site. All these methods and techinques were combined together in order...
Article
Full-text available
A petrographic analysis of clay recipes in Late Neolithic north-western China: continuity and change - Andrew Womack, Hui Wang, Jing Zhou, Rowan Flad
Article
Full-text available
Recent archaeological research at the Diallowali site system has revealed an intensive occupation in northern Senegal between the late 2 nd and mid 1 st millenniums BC. Extensive excavation has produced a wealth of information on the environment, technology, economy, and subsistence regimes of the populations that inhabited this 14-mound cluster al...
Article
Full-text available
Recent work at the Qijia Culture type-site of Qijiaping in the Tao River valley of Gansu Province, China, has shed light on the complex nature of this early Bronze Age site. Situated at the intersection between the mixed pastoralists of eastern central Asia and the agriculturalists of China’s northern Central Plain, Qijia peoples absorbed, evolved,...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Exploring the relationship between technological, social, and environmental change between the late Neolithic and early Bronze Age in the Tao River Valley of Gansu Province, China.