Andrew Wilkins

Andrew Wilkins
Goldsmiths, University of London · Department of Educational Studies

BA (Hons), MRes, PhD, FHEA

About

38
Publications
16,163
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
526
Citations
Introduction
Andrew Wilkins is Reader in Education Policy and Director of Research at Goldsmiths, University of London. He is a policy sociologist writing about education policy, comparative education, education governance. Books include Modernising School Governance (2016), Education Governance and Social Theory (2018). Books in progress: Keywords in Global Education Policy: A Research Guide (2022), Policy Foundations in Education (2022).
Additional affiliations
November 2019 - present
Goldsmiths, University of London
Position
  • Professor (Full)
July 2016 - October 2019
University of East London
Position
  • Professor (Full)
February 2015 - June 2016
University of East London
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (38)
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter I demonstrate the application of using different theoretical approaches to frame meanings and practices of governance. While there are clear overlaps and synergies in the development of these approaches given their shared post-positivist orientations, they are nonetheless distinctive through making possible different kinds of analyt...
Chapter
Full-text available
Using the metaphor of field, this chapter brings together relevant literatures and debates from the Global North to the Global South to trace the intellectual history and contribution to education policy research from the 1970s to the present. To give some provisional structure to what is a messy and complicated narrative, this chapter locates educ...
Chapter
Full-text available
England has long been a ‘laboratory’ for experimenting with structured incentives to compel, among other configurations, the organisation of schools as businesses. The focus of this chapter concerns a recent market-based experiment in education in England called the academies programme. The academies programme makes it possible for schools to opera...
Article
Full-text available
The influence of New Public Management (NPM) on public sector organisation is nowhere more evident or pervasive than in the field of school governance where political actors, school leaders and governors are called upon to make the internal operation of the school more transparent and accountable to others through the explicitness of performance in...
Chapter
Full-text available
A key driver of market education experimentation in England since the 1980s has been a focus on improved conditions for school autonomy and devolved management through greater privatisation management of education services and public-private partnerships, reduced local government bureaucracy and oversight, and maximum delegation of financial and ma...
Poster
Full-text available
Education Policy Futures (EPF) is a non-affiliated, independent, global forum dedicated to fostering knowledge exchange and collaboration among educators and researchers interested in the geopolitics of education policy futures. EPF is critical of accounts that either overestimate the coherence of political programmes or reduce change to a residu...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter critically analyses the relationship between educational leadership and governance through an examination of key trends in global education reform. Through adopting two perspectives of governance as ‘instrumental-rational’ and ‘agonistic-political’, we demonstrate how governance can be used to enrich studies of educational leadership,...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter I draw on Foucault’s genealogical method to examine the professional turn in school governance through a study of recent and profound changes affecting the development of education policy in England since the introduction of the Academies Act 2010. The Academies Act 2010 was a watershed moment in education reform that facilitated wi...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter I draw on diverse theories and literatures to explore the various ways education researchers employ the term ‘neoliberalism’ to situate and enrich their analyses of the relationship between school organisation, statecraft and the wider economy. Understood as a first approximation, neoliberalism is significant as a provisional starti...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter I draw on various literatures and theories spanning different academic disciplines to explore some of the connections between neoliberalism, citizenship and education. Not to be confused with studies of citizenship education, this chapter documents how users of education services, specifically parents, are invited, even compelled, t...
Chapter
Full-text available
The ‘governance turn’ in education research has attracted significant attention from those interested in the role and interaction of hierarchies, markets and networks as overlapping, interdependent systems shaping the formation of education structures and discourses both nationally and globally. The governance turn denotes the movement toward decen...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter I demonstrate the analytical power of a ‘governmentality’ approach (Burchell, Gordon and Miller 1991; Barry, Osborne and Rose 1996; Dean 1999) as an appropriate theoretical strategy for explaining some of the conditions and effects of recent education reforms in England, specifically reforms intended to transform the culture and org...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter I examine the role and ideology of corporatism and the image of the corporation as a dominant policy technology guiding different aspects of school governance in England. Corporatism can be broadly defined as the development of a distinct economic-instrumental rationality captured through the generation of specific forms and means o...
Article
Full-text available
Since 2010 the government in England has committed to accelerating the expansion of academies (‘state-funded independent schools’) through displacing the role of local government as principal manager and overseer of schools. In response increasing numbers of schools are embracing the co-operative trust model to improve economies of scale, facilitat...
Article
Full-text available
For the past six years successive UK governments in England have introduced reforms intended to usher in less aggregated, top-down, bureaucratically overloaded models of service delivery. Yet the ‘hollowing out’ of local government has not resulted in less bureaucracy on the ground or less regulation from above, nor has it diminished hierarchy as a...
Book
Full-text available
Awarded joint-second prize by the Society for Educational Studies (SES) for books published in 2016. Modernising School Governance examines the impact of recent market-based reforms on the role of governors in the English state education system. A focus of the book concerns how government and non-government demands for ‘strong governance’ have been...
Book
Full-text available
Modernising School Governance examines the impact of recent market-based reforms on the role of governors in the English state education system. A focus of the book concerns how government and non-government demands for ‘strong governance’ have been translated to mean improved performance management of senior school leaders and greater monitoring a...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we explore the various spaces and sites through which the figure of the parent is summoned to inhabit and perform market norms and practices in the field of education in England. Since the late 1970s successive governments have called on parents to enact certain duties and obligations in relation to the state. These duties include ado...
Article
Full-text available
Since the 1980s, state schools in England have been required to ensure transparency and accountability through the use of indicators and templates derived from the private sector and, more recently, globally circulating discourses of ‘good governance’ (an appeal to professional standards, technical expertise, and performance evaluation as mechanism...
Article
Full-text available
Este art ículo se cent ra en la relación ent re las normas y práct icas de mercado y la const rucción de la figura del “padre/madre” en la polít ica educat iva británica. Desde la década de los setenta, las familias han sido llamadas a desempeñar ciertos deberes y obligaciones en relación con el estado. Éstos incluyen internalizar responsabilidades...
Article
Full-text available
Since the neoliberal reforms to British education in the 1980s, education debates have been saturated with claims to the efficacy of the market as a mechanism for improving the content and delivery of state education. In recent decades with the expansion and ‘massification’ of higher education, widening participation (WP) has acquired an increasing...
Article
Full-text available
Following the financial collapse in 2008 many commentators went onto pronounce the end of neoliberalism as a credible system for managing welfare state capitalism. The narrow economic belief in individuals as rational utility maximizers (the linchpin of neoliberal governance) was proved to be uncomfortably inaccurate. In light of these claims, Brit...
Article
Full-text available
In the second part of this special issue on neoliberalism, pedagogy and curriculum, I explore the contributions of each author to confronting neo-liberal reforms of education, notably the spectre of neo-liberalism haunting aspects of pedagogy, teaching and curriculum. Exemplary of the scholarly work produced by many critical educators, the contribu...
Article
Full-text available
Situated against the backdrop of a widespread and growing interest in the linkages between neo-liberalism and welfare, this paper introduces the lens of neo-liberalism as a conceptual strategy for thinking about contemporary issues in education policy. Through charting the historic rise of unfettered market institutions and practices in the context...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper I explore how learning strategies based on competition and zero-sum thinking are inscribed into the dynamics of classroom interaction shaping relations between high-achieving pupils, and link elements of these practices to market trends in British education policy discourse. A detour through the politico-historical negotiations shapin...
Article
Full-text available
Since the late 1970s/early 80s political and public policy opinion in England has been saturated with claims to the waste and inefficiency generated through government intervention over the control and delivery of public services. As a corrective to such top-down bureaucracy, neoliberal ideologues insist that citizens should be ‘empowered’ to pursu...
Article
Full-text available
Public battles and private takeovers: Academies and the politics of educational governance Introduced to the British education system under the Education Act 2002 and later enshrined in the New Labour government White Paper Higher Standards, Better Schools for All (DfES, 2005), the Academies policy was set up to enable designated under-performing s...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper I draw on ethnographic observation data taken from a school-based study of two groups of 12-13 year old pupils identified as high achieving and popular to explore how relations between teachers and pupils are mediated and constituted through the spectre of neoliberal values and sensibilities. Specifically, I demonstrate how certain hi...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper I explore the pedagogical and political shift marked by the meaning and practice of diversity offered through New Labour education policy texts, specifically, the policy and practice of personalized learning (or personalization). The aim of this paper is to map the ways in which diversity relays and mobilizes a set of neoliberal posit...
Article
Full-text available
As subjects of the parental right to choose (DES, 1988), parents are called upon to fulfill certain duties and responsibilities when choosing a secondary school for their child, with the expectation that they might navigate the school system ‘successfully’ and become ‘better informed consumers’ (DCSF, 2008). To comply with these rules of citizenshi...
Article
Full-text available
Research on school choice highlights the extent to which a communitarian impulse informs the way some parents engage with their role as chooser. This suggests that the responsibilities of parents as consumers are often negotiated in collective as well as individualizing terms. Drawing on data from a group of mothers of diverse social class and raci...
Article
Full-text available
This paper draws on elements of critical discursive psychology in order to explore some of the issues and concerns raised by parents’ responses to the policy and practice of school choice. Drawing on data from a group of mothers of diverse social class and racial backgrounds, this paper examines the dilemmas some mothers engage with in their role a...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research on school choice highlights the tendency among some White, middle‐class parents to engage with discourses of community responsibility and ethnic diversity as part of their responsibility and duty as choosers and who therefore exercise choice in ways that undercut the individualistic and self‐interested character framing governmental...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (7)
Project
Education Policy Futures (EPF) is a non-affiliated, independent, global forum dedicated to fostering knowledge exchange and collaboration among educators and researchers interested in the geopolitics of education policy futures. EPF is critical of accounts that either overestimate the coherence of political programmes or reduce change to a residual effect of undifferentiated power structures and relations, including global hegemonic projects and governmental rationalities. Instead, EPF encourages debates on the intensity and fragility of education policy futures as assemblages of various conditions, projects, actors, and materials. EPF therefore is philosophically and strategically committed to non-reductionist, post-positivist analyses and methodologies that capture the contestability and revisability of education policy futures. Relatedly, EPF advocates for progressive social change leading to more radical and equitable forms of education around the globe. To this end, EPF encourages, where possible, practical use of theory as vantage points through which to reimagine and transform education policy futures. EPF is open to anyone with similar research interests and commitments. EPF aims to host 3-4 seminars each year. To join the members list, participate in events and stay updated on any developments related to EPF, please email Andrew Wilkins (andrew.wilkins@gold.ac.uk) Follow us on twitter @EPFutures
Project
A collection of book reviews
Project
A collection of peer reviewed books, book chapters and journal articles looking at neoliberalism and its complicated history with education.