Andrew D Warren

Andrew D Warren
Florida Museum of Natural History · McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity

PhD

About

203
Publications
39,435
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
2,161
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2010 - present
Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida
Position
  • Senior Collections Manager

Publications

Publications (203)
Preprint
Butterflies are a diverse and charismatic insect group that are thought to have diversified via coevolution with plants and in response to dispersals following key geological events. These hypotheses have been poorly tested at the macroevolutionary scale because a comprehensive phylogenetic framework and datasets on global distributions and larval...
Article
Full-text available
A new species of Lindra Evans, 1955 is described from a single specimen from Napo Province, Ecuador. Lindra olafmielkei sp. nov. is the darkest species in the genus, with a nearly immaculate dark brown dorsal surface and comparatively rounded forewing apex, but stigma and genitalic morphology clearly place it within Lindra. This new species constit...
Article
Full-text available
Four new species of Piruna are described from Mexico, and notes on their morphology, distribution, phenology, biogeography and ecology are provided. Piruna uruapana sp. nov. is described from the Municipality of Uruapan, Michoacán, in the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (Eje Neovolcánico). Piruna chinicuila sp. nov. is described from the Munici...
Article
Full-text available
The global increase in species richness toward the tropics across continents and taxonomic groups, referred to as the latitudinal diversity gradient, stimulated the formulation of many hypotheses to explain the underlying mechanisms of this pattern. We evaluate several of these hypotheses to explain spatial diversity patterns in a butterfly family,...
Article
Our previous comments in opposition to Case 3709 (Calhoun et al., 2020) cited our genomics studies, which were then available only in preprint form (Cong et al., 2019). We now announce the publication of our results in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution and provide the associated citation
Article
Full-text available
Populations of Hesperia uncas W. H. Edwards, 1863 in Mexico and the adjacent United States are reviewed, and Hesperia uncas nadineae A. Warren, Gott & McGuire ssp. nov. is described from the northeastern Mexican states of Coahuila and Nuevo León.
Article
Full-text available
The North American skipper butterfly Polites rhesus (W. H. Edwards, 1878) is reviewed, and notes on its morphology, distribution, phenology, biogeography and ecology are provided. In addition, a new subspecies, Polites rhesus otomi A. Warren & Gott, ssp. nov., is described from high-elevation grasslands in the State of México, Mexico.
Article
Full-text available
Centuries of zoological studies have amassed billions of specimens in collections worldwide. Genomics of these specimens promises to reinvigorate biodiversity research. However, because DNA degrades with age in historical specimens, it is a challenge to obtain genomic data for them and analyze degraded genomes. We developed experimental and computa...
Article
The Neotropical skipper genus Sodalia Evans, 1955 and its respective species are revised. Sodalia includes five species: S. sodalis (Butler, 1877) (type species), S. argyrospila (Mabille, 1876), S. coler (Schaus, 1902), S. petiti Gaviria-Ortiz, Dolibaina & A. Warren sp. nov. (described from low to mid elevations of the western Andes of Ecuador and...
Article
Skippers are a species rich and widespread group of butterflies with evolutionary patterns and processes largely unstudied despite some recent efforts. Among Hesperiidae, the subfamily Heteropterinae is a moderately diverse clade comprising ca. 200 species distributed from North to South America and from Africa to the Palearctic region. While some...
Article
The Old-World Tropics encompass many unique biomes and associated biotas shaped by drastic climate and geological changes throughout the Cenozoic. Disjunct distributions of clades between the Afrotropics and the Oriental regions are testament to these changes. Awl and policeman skippers (Hesperiidae: Coeliadinae) are disjunctly distributed with som...
Article
Our previous comments in opposition to Case 3709 (Calhoun et al., 2019) cited some of our ongoing genomic studies, which were made public on 4 September 2019 (Cong et al., 2019). As promised, we now provide additional details about this work. We are pleased that Scott et al. (2019) agreed with the principal conclusions of our research (based on pre...
Preprint
Full-text available
The latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG) is arguably one of the most striking patterns in nature. The global increase in species richness toward the tropics across continents and taxonomic groups stimulated the formulation of many hypotheses to explain the underlying mechanisms of this pattern. We evaluated several of these hypotheses to explain sp...
Article
The visual systems and diel activity patterns of butterflies and moths have been studied for decades, yet understanding the underlying mechanisms that are associated with the evolution of these remains a major challenge. The order Lepidoptera is principally composed of nocturnal lineages with extreme morphological and behavioural adaptations to thi...
Article
The genus Tarmia Lindsey, 1925, long considered a junior synonym of Phanes Godman, 1901, is here revised and its status is revalidated based on morphological evidence. Two Andean species are included in Tarmia: the type species, T. monastica Lindsey, 1925 comb. rev., and a new species herein described, Tarmia greeneyi A. Warren, Medeiros, Dolibaina...
Preprint
Full-text available
Centuries of zoological studies amassed billions of specimens in collections worldwide. Genomics of these specimens promises to rejuvenate biodiversity research. The obstacles stem from DNA degradation with specimen age. Overcoming this challenge, we set out to resolve a series of long-standing controversies involving a group of butterflies. We ded...
Article
The origin of taxa presenting a disjunct distribution between Africa and Asia has puzzled biogeographers for more than a century. This biogeographic pattern has been hypothesized to be the result of transoceanic long‐distance dispersal, Oligocene dispersal through forested corridors, Miocene dispersal through the Arabian Peninsula or passive disper...
Article
We believe the actions requested by Case 3709 are premature and unnecessary, as it is now possible to determine the taxonomic identities of ancient specimens through revolutionary methods of genomic analysis. We are nearing the completion of a groundbreaking, multi-year research project to determine and analyze genomic sequences of a number of name...
Article
Full-text available
We review the genus Cyclargus Nabokov (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) based on detailed comparative analyses of wing patterns, genitalia, and mitochondrial COI DNA barcode sequences, and suggest that Cyclargus is composed of four species: C. thomasi (Clench), C. woodruffi (W. Comstock and Huntington), C. ammon (Lucas), and C. dominica (Möschler). The fol...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Butterflies (Papilionoidea) are perhaps the most charismatic insect lineage, yet phylogenetic relationships among them remain incompletely studied and controversial. This is especially true for skippers (Hesperiidae), one of the most species-rich and poorly studied butterfly families. Methods: To infer a robust phylogenomic hypothesi...
Article
Relationships within satyrine butterflies have been notoriously difficult to resolve using both morphology and Sanger sequencing methods, and this is particularly true for the mainly Neotropical subtribe Euptychiina, which contains about 400 described species. Known larvae of Euptychiina feed on grasses and sedges, with the exception of the genus E...
Article
Full-text available
A new species of Cyllopsis R. Felder, 1869, is described and illustrated from the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico. Cyllopsis tomemmeli A. Warren & Nakahara, sp. nov., is currently known from 13 specimens (9 males and 4 females) collected on March 26–28, 1959, southeast of San Cristóbal de Las Casas. Despite extensive studies on the butterfly fauna of...
Article
Full-text available
Recent taxonomic studies on the genus Wahydra Steinhauser, 1991, have described five new species in the past two years, from high elevations in the Andes Mountains. A markedly distinct species of Wahydra is herein described and illustrated based on a single male specimen from Ecuadorian Andes, Wahydra graslieae A. Warren, Carneiro & Dolibaina, sp....
Article
Full-text available
Background Skippers (Family: Hesperiidae) are a large group of butterflies with ca. 4000 species under 567 genera. The lack of a time-calibrated higher-level phylogeny of the group has precluded understanding of its evolutionary past. We here use a 10-gene dataset to reconstruct the most comprehensive time-calibrated phylogeny of the group, and exp...
Article
Full-text available
Oxynetra aureopecta sp. n. is described from the Sierra Madre Oriental of east-central Mexico. Visually similar to Mesoamerican O. hopfferi Staudinger, 1888 in having five orange bands on the abdomen above, it is diagnosed by orange forecoxae and palpi beneath, narrower forewing hyaline bands and a prominent 6% difference in the COI DNA barcode seq...
Article
Full-text available
Despite multiple attempts to infer the higher-level phylogenetic relationships of skipper butterflies (Family Hesperiidae), uncertainties in the deep clade relationships persist. The most recent phylogenetic analysis included fewer than 30% of known genera and data from three gene markers. Here we reconstruct the higher-level relationships with a r...
Article
Full-text available
Oeneis tanana A. Warren & Nakahara is described from the Tanana River Basin in southeastern Alaska, USA. This new taxon belongs to the bore group of Oeneis Hübner, [1819] and is apparently closest to O. chryxus (E. Doubleday, [1849]) by morphology, including its larger size and similarity of the female genitalia. In wing patterns and COI mitochondr...
Article
Full-text available
For 200 years zoologists have relied on phenotypes to learn about the evolution of animals. A glance at the genotype, even through several gene markers, revolutionized our understanding of animal phylogeny. Recent advances in sequencing techniques allow researchers to study speciation mechanisms and the link between genotype and phenotype using com...
Article
Full-text available
A list of 1331 butterfly taxa of specific level from Oaxaca is presented, which comprise 68% of the recorded taxa in Mexico of these taxonomic levels. These taxa belong to 462 genera, 24 subfamilies, and six families of Papilionoidea (sensu lato). The list of butterflies of this state is updated with the inclusion of 165 new records at specific and...
Article
Full-text available
A survey of butterflies of Michoacán, Mexico, found 262 species in 131 genera, four subfamilies, and one family of Hesperioidea from 123 localities. Fortyfour species are reported as endemic to México. This is the first checklist of skippers for Michoacán, and 32% of the species recorded in the country are listed. The species are grouped according...
Article
The male of the rare Amazonian skipper Telles pyrex Evans, 1955 is described and illustrated for the first time. This species has been without a generic affiliation, incertae sedis, since 2009. The generic placement of this species is investigated, considering characters from the male genitalia, wings, and DNA barcodes. Pseudorphe A. Warren & Dolib...
Article
Full-text available
Two new species of Euptychia are described and illustrated from southern Mexico and Guatemala. Euptychia neblina A. Warren & Nakahara n. sp., is described from eleven specimens from cloud forest habitats in the Mexican states of Oaxaca and Chiapas, as well as Baja Verapaz, Guatemala. Euptychia lacandona A. Warren & Nakahara n. sp., is currently kno...
Article
Full-text available
Extremely long proboscides of insect flower visitors have been regarded as an example of a coevolutionary arms race, assuming that these insects act as efficient pollinators for their nectar host plants. However, the effect of proboscis length on generalized or specialized flower use remains unclear and the efficiency of butterfly pollination is am...
Article
A new species of Cogia A. Butler, 1870, is described from two localities ranging from 1470 to 2000 m elevation in the Sierra Madre del Sur of Oaxaca, Mexico; it occurs in cloud forest habitats and appears to be endemic to Mexico. Cogia buena, n. sp., is closely related to C. mala Evans, 1953 and C. aventinus (Godman & Salvin, 1894); these three spe...
Article
Full-text available
Exaggerated morphologies have evolved in insects as adaptations to nectar feeding by natural selection. For example, the suctorial mouthparts of butterflies enable these insects to gain access to floral nectar concealed inside deep floral tubes. Proboscis length in Lepidoptera is known to scale with body size, but whether extreme absolute proboscis...
Article
Full-text available
The genus Codatractus Lindsey, 1921 (Hesperiidae: Eudaminae) includes 17 taxa; three are endemic to México (C. yucatanus, C. cyledis, and C. uvydixa). The genus is distributed in the Neotropical and southern Neartic region, from southern Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas, across Mexico and Central America, to relatively dry regions of Ecuador, Venezue...
Conference Paper
Despite anecdotal literature reports of male saturniid moths being attracted to Argiope spiders, the phenomenon has never been studied in detail. In June-July 2013, in Gainesville, Florida, I studied male Anisota pellucida attracted to Argiope aurantia; over 130 male A. pellucida were documented as food items or intercepted as they flew into the sp...
Article
Full-text available
The absence of androconia on the dorsal surface of the wings is established as an external diagnostic character of male Hermeuptychia intricata Grishin, 2014, that distinguishes this newly described species from males of the sympatric H. sosybius (Fabricius, 1793). Additional United States records of H. intricata are reviewed, extending its distrib...
Article
Full-text available
Based on a thorough analysis of the literature on Lepidoptera associated with Mexico, and a review of the database MARIPOSA (> 500 000 records and specimens), a synthesis of the global Lepidoptera diversity is presented, including estimates and proportions of diversity and endemism in Mexico. In addition, a detailed examination of the species richn...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanus simplicius (Stoll, 1790) is a frequently encountered Neotropical skipper butterfly, ranging from northern Argentina through South and Central America to southern Texas, USA (Evans 1952; Rickard 1977), where it appears to be a non-established stray from Mexico (Neck 1996; a single record also exists for California, see Tilden 1976). Its dist...
Article
Full-text available
Subspecies are commonly used taxonomic units to formally describe intraspecific geographic variation in morphological traits. However, the concept of subspecies is not clearly defined, and there is little agreement about what they represent in terms of evolutionary units, and whether they can be used as reliably useful units in conservation, evolut...
Data
Protocol followed for isolation of 10 microsatellite loci for Polygonia c-album . Six of these loci were used in this study. (DOC)
Data
List of samples used along with the collection localities, Genbank accession numbers, collectors and haplotypes. (XLS)
Article
Abstract The Florida Museum of Natural History's McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity, on the University of Florida campus in Gainesville, Florida, has become one of the world's largest institutions for research on butterflies and moths, and an important research facility for insect science. The facility was constructed by combining the...
Article
Full-text available
A biodiversity inventory of the Lepidoptera of Pico Bonito National Park and vicinity, in the Department of Atlantida of northern Honduras, was initiated in 2009 to obtain baseline data. We present a revised checklist of Honduran butterfly species (updated from the initial 1967 lists), as well as the first comprehensive list of Honduran moths. Our...
Chapter
Full-text available
“Order Lepidoptera Linnaeus, 1758. In: Zhang, Z.-Q. (Ed.) Animal biodiversity: An outline of higher-level classification and survey of taxonomic richness”.
Article
Full-text available
Boloria is restricted to cooler regions of the northern hemisphere, and represents a model for understanding recent diversification of phytophagous insects in the Holarctic region. We infer the phylogeny of the genus based on characters from adult morphology and three genes (COI, EF1-α and wingless). We revise the subgenus level classification, and...
Article
Full-text available
The butterfly Heliconius erato can see from the UV to the red part of the light spectrum with color vision proven from 440 to 640 nm. Its eye is known to contain three visual pigments, rhodopsins, produced by an 11-cis-3-hydroxyretinal chromophore together with long wavelength (LWRh), blue (BRh) and UV (UVRh1) opsins. We now find that H. erato has...
Article
Full-text available
Se describe una especie nueva de Parelbella. Se conoce de los estados de Veracruz y Oaxaca, México, y posiblemente es endémico a la parte austral de la Sierra Madre Oriental. Translation provided by the authors.
Article
Full-text available
La fenología de las mariposas fue analizada en la región de Calakmul (CR), Campeche, México. A lo largo de tres años se registraron 60,662 individuos, de 359 especies en 207 géneros, 18 subfamilias, cinco familias, y dos superfamilias. La mayor diversidad fue registrada durante octubre y noviembre. La fluctuación mensual de la diversidad fue defini...
Article
Full-text available
Stinga Evans, 1955, has been considered monotypic since its description despite geographical variation that has not been elucidated. The variation of Stinga morrisoni (W. H. Edwards, 1878) described and figured here includes a range of superficial phenotypes segregated by a combination of geography and elevation, but united by a common genital morp...
Article
Stinga Evans, 1955, has been considered monotypic since its description despite geographical variation that has not been elucidated. The variation of Stinga morrisoni (W. H. Edwards, 1878) described and figured here includes a range of superficial phenotypes segregated by a combination of geography and elevation, but united by a common genital morp...
Article
Abstract We propose a revised higher classification for the genera of Hesperiidae (skipper butterflies) of the world. We have augmented our published DNA data matrix with 49 morphological characters in order to infer relationships for taxa not sampled in the molecular study. We use the results of a combined analysis to identify morphological synapo...