Andrew Sidman

Andrew Sidman
City University of New York - John Jay College of Criminal Justice | John Jay CUNY · Department of Political Science

Doctor of Philosophy

About

20
Publications
3,871
Reads
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216
Citations
Citations since 2016
4 Research Items
131 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220510152025
Additional affiliations
August 2007 - May 2016
City University of New York - John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Position
  • Faculty Member

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
A major avenue through which Voting Rights Act cases are adjudicated is three‐judge district court panels. These panels mix district and circuit court judges and exist in federal law to force certain important legal questions to be decided in a multimember environment. Using an original dataset of VRA cases decided by three‐judge district court pan...
Article
Work on the Courts of Appeals has found that judges adjust their behavior based on the judges with whom they serve. These “panel effects” are traditionally described in terms of preferences, with the effect of a judge’s ideology conditioned by the preferences of other judges on the panel. Additionally, prior work has observed panel effects based in...
Article
Full-text available
Most of the empirical work on separate opinion writing by lower federal court judges examines the U.S. Courts of Appeals. Given the Supreme Court's discretionary jurisdiction, it is argued that dissenting opinions operate as a cue signaling that a case is worthy of review. Concurrences, on the other hand, allow judges to join dispositional majoriti...
Article
Full-text available
Researchers cannot assess the importance of ideology to judicial behavior without good measures of ideology, and great effort has been spent developing measures that are valid and precise. A few of these have become commonly used in studies of judicial behavior. An emphasis has naturally been placed on developing continuous measures of ideology, li...
Article
Complementing the burgeoning literature on agenda setting on the Supreme Court of the United States, this article addresses a key question heretofore overlooked - Is the justices' choice to review a decision independent of the selection of cases for review by the litigants? We argue that the certiorari process cannot be modeled as an independent on...
Article
Full-text available
Right after the 1936 election the Gallup Poll began probing party identification. From then on until 1952, when the National Election Studies entered the field, nearly 200 surveys produced measurements of partisanship in the American electorate. We exploit this largely unexplored data set to examine the partisan transformation commonly called the N...
Article
The ingredients of wartime morale are the subject of lively debate, with casualties, prospect of victory, and elite cues representing the major points of view. This research covers the wars in Korea and Vietnam with expanded time series of public support and rare surveys that probed perceptions of victory during those military interventions. The pr...
Article
We offer a new view of the New Deal realignment. It was the wartime experience and the postwar prosperity, not the Great Depression or the New Deal, that gave the Democratic Party its overwhelming hold on the American electorate for the next three decades. The 1948 election plays the critical role, not the 1932 or the 1936 election. The generation...
Article
Much work has acknowledged partisan differences in distributive benefits. Few works, however, have empirically examined the role party building activities play in these distributions. Through Exchange Theory, we hypothesize that legislators are rewarded with distributive benefits for promoting the legislative and electoral goals of the party. Using...
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Much scholarship has noted that there are significant differences in the political behavior of women and men. Women, for example, are found to be more likely to identify as and vote for Democrats, less likely to hold conservative issue positions, and more likely to vote for incumbents. One of the more disturbing gender gaps occurs in political know...
Article
As the 2008 election approaches, we offer a reexamination of the 2000 election — its place in history, political science, and presidential forecasting models. This is especially relevant since 2008, like 2000, will be an election without a president seeking reelection. How should forecasting models deal with such elections? Looking carefully at 200...
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Full-text available
The war in Iraq, so the widely accepted view, hurt the reelection of George W. Bush. We contend, to the contrary, that the war helped him get reelected. First, we show that his victory fits the dominant pattern of wartime elections in American history. Second, we find that Bush’s approval ratings benefited from a complex rally where the Iraq war pr...
Article
Full-text available
Distributive benefits and American House elections: Outcomes and voter heterogeneity
Article
Distributive benefits (e.g. pork barrel projects or earmarks) are widely recognized as an important contributor to incumbency advantage. Obtaining them exists only within the realm of the representative, making it difficult for the electoral challenger to overcome incumbent credit claiming for such benefits. This view of distributive benefits is su...

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Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
This project is beginning as an examination of collegiality and panel effects in federal district courts hearing cases arising under the Voting Rights Act.