Andrew F Rowley

Andrew F Rowley
Swansea University | SWAN · Department of Biosciences

BSc, PhD, DSc

About

213
Publications
28,397
Reads
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6,438
Citations
Citations since 2016
35 Research Items
1744 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
Additional affiliations
September 1979 - present
Swansea University
Position
  • Personal chair

Publications

Publications (213)
Article
Full-text available
A large knowledge gap exists regarding the disease profile and pathologic condition of the invasive, slipper limpet Crepidula fornicata. To help address this, we performed a year-long health survey at two sites in South Wales, UK – subtidal Swansea Bay and intertidal Milford Haven. In total, 1,800 limpets were screened systematically for haemolymph...
Chapter
This is a review of recent work on fungal and oomycete (water mold) pathogens of crustaceans.
Article
Full-text available
Invasion and spread of alien species can drive ecosystem changes, such as, the dynamics of infectious diseases. The non-native, marine gastropod Crepidula fornicata has become established across European coastlines over the last century but there remains little insight on its disease carrying capacity and potential role as a source/sink of parasite...
Chapter
Crustaceans are a large group of arthropods with over 67,000 known species that inhabit a wide range of habitats including freshwater, estuarine and sea water. This chapter reviews the main diseases of crustaceans caused bacteria. Many species of bacteria are pathogens of these animals but vibrios are the main group of pathogens. In particular, Vib...
Book
Full-text available
Many invertebrates are serious pests of agriculture (e.g. mites and locusts), vectors of disease (e.g. mosquitoes and aquatic snails) and venomous (e.g. scorpions), whilst others are beneficial to humans as pollinators, food sources, and detritivores. Despite their obvious ecological, medical, and economic importance, this is the first comprehensiv...
Chapter
Phylum Mollusca is a large and diverse group of invertebrate protostomes of over 85,000 species including gastropods, cephalopods and bivalves. Molluscs are the largest marine phylum. Marine molluscs are economically important as a high protein food source for humans and provide ecosystem services including nutrient recycling, carbon sequestration,...
Chapter
Full-text available
Textbooks on immunology rarely spend more than a few pages describing the principles of invertebrate immunology. Coming away from these often gives the reader the impression that this immune system is simple and non-specific in nature yet with over 1.3 million extant species of invertebrates, there is inevitably a great diversity of strategies to d...
Article
Full-text available
Host, pathogen, and environment are determinants of the disease triangle, the latter being a key driver of disease outcomes and persistence within a community. The dinoflagellate genus Hematodinium is detrimental to crustaceans globally – considered to suppress the innate defences of hosts, making them more susceptible to co-infections. Evidence su...
Chapter
The study of diseased invertebrates dates back to ancient times. Aristotle in his Historia Animalium used his observational ability to describe a disease of bees; presumably those used by the ancient Greeks to produce honey. Observation, be it with the naked eye or with the assistance of microscopes, still remains a fundamental part of any disease...
Article
Full-text available
Probiotic use in aquaculture settings can be an approach for disease control and dietary supplementation. We assessed the antagonistic effect of culture supernatants of lactic acid bacteria on the growth of known shrimp pathogens, Vibrio (Listonella) anguillarum, Vibrio alginolyticus and V. harveyi, using a quantitative microplate bioassay. Superna...
Article
Full-text available
While most crab production for human consumption worldwide comes from capture fisheries, there is increasing production of selected species using aquaculture-based methods. This is both for the purpose of stock replacement and direct yield for human consumption. Disease has limited the ability to produce larval crabs in commercial hatcheries and th...
Preprint
Full-text available
A large knowledge gap exists regarding the disease profile and pathologic condition of the invasive, non-native, slipper limpet Crepidula fornicata. To help address this, we performed a yearlong health survey across two sites in South Wales UK, subtidal Swansea Bay and intertidal Milford Haven. In total, 1,800 limpets were screened systematically f...
Article
Full-text available
Diarrhetic shellfish-poisoning (DSP) toxins such as okadaic acid and dinophysistoxins harm the human gastrointestinal tract, and therefore, their levels are regulated to an upper limit of 160 μg per kg tissue to protect consumers. Rodents are used routinely for risk assessment and studies concerning mechanisms of toxicity, but there is a general mo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Host, pathogen, and environment are determinants of the disease triangle, the latter being a key driver of disease outcomes and persistence within a community. The dinoflagellate genus Hematodinium is detrimental to crustaceans globally – considered to suppress the innate defences of hosts, making them more susceptible to co-infections. Evidence su...
Preprint
Full-text available
Marine ecosystems are affected by multiple, well-known stressors like fishing and climate change, but a less documented concern is disease. Marine reserves have been successful in replenishing stocks and aiding recruitment but studies have shown that high population abundances in marine reserves may lead to unwanted secondary effects such as increa...
Article
Full-text available
This study provides a morphological and phylogenetic characterization of two novel species of the order Haplosporida (Haplosporidium carcini n. sp., and H. cranc n. sp.) infecting the common shore crab Carcinus maenas collected at one location in Swansea Bay, South Wales, UK. Both parasites were observed in the haemolymph, gills and hepatopancreas....
Article
Full-text available
There is a paucity of knowledge regarding the diversity and impact(s) of disease-causing fungi in marine animals, especially shellfish. In efforts to address this knowledge gap for the shore crab Carcinus maenas, a year-long disease screen was carried out across two sites in Swansea Bay (Wales, UK) with a view to characterising putative fungal infe...
Article
The slipper limpet Crepidula fornicata is an invasive, non-native, marine species found throughout the coastal waters of southern England and Wales, UK. These limpets are considered to blight commercial shellfish banks, notably oysters, yet little is known about their disease-carrying capacity or their immunobiology. To address the latter, we isola...
Article
Sacculina carcini is a common parasite of the European shore crab, Carcinus maenas. Following successful penetration of the host, numerous rootlets are formed that permeate through the hosts' tissues. Ultimately, these form an externa that houses the developing nauplii larvae of the parasite. Most studies have quantified levels of infection by coun...
Article
Full-text available
Mikrocytids are a widespread but rather neglected group of parasites of aquatic invertebrates. One such parasite is Paramikrocytos canceri—discovered to infect the antennal gland of the juvenile edible crab, Cancer pagurus, taken from several intertidal sites across the United Kingdom. To determine if this parasite is also present in other species...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The parasitic dinoflagellates of the genus Hematodinium represent the causative agent of so-called bitter or pink crab disease in a broad range of shellfish taxa. Outbreaks of Hematodinium-associated disease can devastate local fishing and aquaculture efforts. The goal of our study was to examine the potential role of the common shore...
Article
Full-text available
Indomethacin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that causes gastric ulceration and increased 'leakiness' in rat models, and is used routinely as a toxicology assay to screen novel compounds for repair and restitution properties. We set out to establish conditions for indomethacin-induced gut damage in wax-moth (Galleria mellonella) larvae wi...
Article
Full-text available
The polyether toxin, okadaic acid, causes diarrhetic shellfish poisoning in humans. Despite extensive research into its cellular targets using rodent models, we know little about its putative effect(s) on innate immunity. We inoculated larvae of the greater waxmoth, Galleria mellonella, with physiologically relevant doses of okadaic acid by direct...
Preprint
Full-text available
Indomethacin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that causes gastric ulceration and increased leakiness in rat models, and is used routinely as an assay to screen novel compounds for repair and restitution properties. We set out to establish conditions for indomethacin-induced gut damage in wax-moth (Galleria mellonella) larvae with a view to...
Article
Crustaceans are a large group of mainly aquatic invertebrates with a long evolutionary history. The circulating hemocytes of crustaceans consist of three main types each with their own role in immunity and hemostasis. Fixed phagocytes in the hepatopancreas and nephrocytes in the gills also augment the activities of the hemocytes. The main cellular...
Poster
Full-text available
Since the move towards an ecosystem-based approach in fisheries management, marine protected areas (MPAs) have become increasingly popular. Implementation, however, is somewhat contentious and as a result of their short history, effects are still widely unknown and understudied. Here, we investigated the health of brown crab Cancer pagurus and Euro...
Article
There are few reports of bacterial diseases in crabs. A juvenile edible crab (Cancer pagurus) with a rickettsial-like infection was found in the intertidal zone at Freshwater East in South West Wales in July, 2012. Large numbers of bacteria-like particles were found in the haemolymph and within fixed phagocytes of the hepatopancreas. Molecular sequ...
Article
Full-text available
A significant pathogen of crustaceans is thought to be Hematodinium. Much is known about the ecology and the effects of this disease on the sustainability of crustacean populations, but significantly less is known about the mode of transmission and fate of infected animals. Attempts have been made to transmit the disease under aquarium conditions t...
Article
The prevalence of disease in edible crabs (Cancer pagurus) was assessed at two sites in South West Wales; one estuarine (Pembroke Ferry) and another facing open water (Freshwater East). Diseases included pink crab disease caused by Hematodinium sp., an infection of the antennal gland caused by Paramikrocytos canceri and an idiopathic inflammatory c...
Article
Full-text available
The gills of the European lobster Homarus gammarus (L.) are susceptible to parasitization by the copepod Nicothoë astaci, the lobster louse. This copepod feeds on haemolymph of the host and can damage the gills, potentially affecting gaseous exchange capabilities. To investigate the host response to the parasite, haemolymph levels of total protein,...
Article
Hematodinium spp. infect over 40 species of crustaceans worldwide, but have not been reported to infect the European lobster, Homarus gammarus. In this study, Hematodinium parasites (a mixture of uni- and multinucleate trophont-like stages) were taken from donor crabs (Cancer pagurus) and injected into juvenile H. gammarus. Juvenile C. pagurus were...
Article
Full-text available
Marine conservation zones (MCZs) are a form of spatial marine management, increasingly popular since the move towards ecosystem-based fisheries management. Implementation, however, is somewhat contentious and as a result of their short history, their effects are still widely unknown and understudied. Here, we investigate the population and health o...
Article
The ectoparasitic copepod, Nicothoë astaci (the 'lobster louse'), infests the gills of the European lobster, Homarus gammarus. There have been limited studies on this haematophagous species; therefore knowledge of this parasite is rudimentary. The current study examines the surface morphology of this parasitic copepod, detached from the host, conce...
Article
SUMMARY This study reports on the prevalence and severity of infections caused by the parasitic dinoflagellate, Hematodinium in juvenile edible crabs (Cancer pagurus) found in 2 intertidal survey sites (Mumbles Head and Oxwich Bay) in the Bristol Channel, UK. Crabs were assessed for the presence and severity of Hematodinium infections by the histol...
Article
Full-text available
Diseases of lobster shells have a significant impact on fishing industries but the risk of disease transmission between different lobster species has yet to be properly investigated. This study compared bacterial biofilm communities from American (Homarus americanus) and European lobsters (H. gammarus), to assess both healthy cuticle and diseased c...
Data
Data S1. Supporting experimental procedures. Figure S1. Lack of correlation between time since last molt versus the risk of lesion formation following experimental damage to claw or carapace. A, B, C = carapace; D, E, F = claw. Time zero refers to the start of the experiment. Figure S2. Lack of correlation between duration of intermolt period and r...
Article
Both wild and cultured mussels (Mytilus edulis, Mytilus galloprovincialis and hybrids), are found along most of the Irish coastline. M. edulis is widespread along all Irish coasts and is the only mussel species present on both the east coast of Ireland and the Welsh coast in the Irish Sea. M. galloprovincialis and hybrids are found along the Irish...
Article
The Irish Sea and surrounding regions are a rich source of shellfish production as a result of captive fishing and aquaculture. Key species produced include lobsters (Homarus gammarus), edible crabs (Cancer pagurus), langoustines (Nephrops norvegicus), flat oysters (Ostrea edulis), cockles (Cerestoderma edule) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). The...
Article
The integument of arthropods is an important first-line defence against the invasion of parasites and pathogens. Once damaged, this can be subject to colonisation by microbial agents from the surrounding environment, which in crustaceans can lead to a condition termed shell disease syndrome. This condition has been reported in several crustacean sp...
Article
Juvenile edible crabs, Cancer pagurus L., were surveyed from Mumbles Head and Oxwich Bay in South Wales, UK, and the number of heterotrophic bacteria and vibrios in the hemolymph was determined. The percentage of crabs with hemolymph containing bacteria was variable over the survey with higher numbers of animals affected in summer than in winter. P...
Article
This study aimed to examine the pathobiology of a haplosporidian-like infection in juvenile (pre-recruit) edible crabs (Cancer pagurus) from two locations in South West Wales, U.K. Infected crabs showed no external symptoms of the disease but dissection revealed an infected and hypertrophic antennal gland. Histological examination showed extensive...
Poster
Full-text available
The cuticle morphology of the American lobster Homarus americanus is a highly studied area, however its European counterpart, Homarus gammarus is not so well examined. Recent studies show a difference in diseases found between the species, as well as reports of H. americanus as an invasive species in European waters. This study looked into the diff...
Article
Full-text available
Marine reserves (or No-Take Zones) are implemented to protect species and habitats, with the aim of restoring a balanced ecosystem. Although the benefits of marine reserves are commonly monitored, there is a lack of insight into the potential detriments of such highly protected waters. High population densities attained within reserves may induce n...
Data
Full-text available
Overall comparison of shell disease severity in Lundy Island lobsters (Refuge zone vs. No-take Zone) surveyed during July 2010. Significant differences are highlighted in blue. (PDF)
Data
Data on population statistics and health of lobsters surveyed at Lundy Island, UK in May and July 2010. Lobsters are categorised according to gender, size and zone in order to assess the impact of a marine reserve (i.e. NTZ) on the population structure and health of resident lobsters. Significant differences are highlighted in blue. (PDF)
Data
Full-text available
Data on shell disease severity in lobsters surveyed at Lundy Island during July 2010. Lobsters are categorised according to zone and gender in order to assess the impact of a marine reserve (i.e. No-Take Zone) on the severity of shell disease in resident lobsters. Significant differences are highlighted in blue. (PDF)
Data
Overall population and health differences between the lobster populations of the Refuge Zone (RZ) and No-Take Zone (NTZ) at Lundy Island, UK. Lobsters were sampled in May and July 2010. Significant differences between the RZ and NTZ are highlighted in blue. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
This study reports on an emerging fungal disease of the edible crab, Cancer pagurus. Juvenile (prerecruit) crabs were found to be subject to this disease condition during the months of May to September at two intertidal sites in South Wales, United Kingdom. Histopathology revealed that the fungi overwhelm the host response in the tissues, leading t...