Andrew Rogers

Andrew Rogers
The University of Queensland | UQ · School of Biological Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy

About

6
Publications
2,010
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454
Citations
Introduction
Additional affiliations
October 2014 - October 2017
Durham University
Position
  • Research Assistant
October 2014 - April 2019
The University of Queensland
Position
  • PhD
March 2009 - March 2011
Stellenbosch University
Position
  • Master's Student

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
Full-text available
Droughts, heatwaves, floods and fires The ghosts of digging mammals past Talking night parrots on Paruku Country Conserving hollow-nesting birds How did the fish cross the road? The remarkable forty-spotted pardalote The new TSX for Australian birds Georgia Garrard: researcher profile
Article
Most terrestrial species on Earth are ectothermic and track temperature at small spatial scales, from sun flecks to cool shaded spots. Current assessments of thermal heterogeneity in complex environments are predominately characterized by ambient temperature. This omission of solar radiation may lead to inaccurate conclusions regarding thermoregula...
Article
Full-text available
Selective logging is one of the major drivers of tropical forest degradation, causing important shifts in species composition. Whether such changes modify interactions between species and the networks in which they are embedded remain fundamental questions to assess the ‘health’ and ecosystem functionality of logged forests. We focus on interaction...
Article
Full-text available
In this study we report avian and mammalian scavengers foraging on migratory bird carcasses in the Sonoran Desert. We used remote cameras to monitor carcasses we found along a power line right-of-way (n = 25). We documented four species scavenging 10 carcasses (kit fox, Vulpes macrotis, n = 4; coyote, Canis latrans, n = 3; common raven, Corvus cora...
Article
Full-text available
AimAltered habitats may form entirely novel ecosystems that support new combinations of species. How indigenous species use invaded areas is, however, not well understood. Here, we investigate the value of Australian Acacia thickets as novel ecosystems in the Western Cape of South Africa by surveying bird assemblages within them. LocationWestern Ca...
Article
Full-text available
Aim The biophysical impacts of invasive Australian acacias and their effects on ecosystem services are explored and used to develop a framework for improved restoration practices. Location South Africa, Portugal and Chile. Methods A conceptual model of ecosystem responses to the increasing severity (density and duration) of invasions was developed...

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