Andrew J McGrath

Andrew J McGrath
Charles Sturt University · School of Psychology

PhD, BA (Hons)

About

33
Publications
10,406
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
408
Citations
Additional affiliations
February 2008 - present
Charles Sturt University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (33)
Article
Full-text available
Labeling theory suggests that contact with the criminal justice system leads to feelings of stigmatization, which will consequently have the counterproductive effect of increasing offending. The current study investigated this phenomenon by (a) interviewing 394 young people sentenced in the New South Wales Children’s Court about their emotional rea...
Article
Objective: The NART-2 and WTAR are used to estimate premorbid intellectual functioning. There are concerns about their accuracy. Our aim was to develop models predicting WASI-II scores from the NART-2 and WTAR variables and evaluate their accuracy within an Australian sample. Method: The sample included 145 adults aged 18.91 to 70.64 years (M = 34....
Article
Full-text available
Accurate prediction of premorbid functioning is important in neuropsychological assessment. We aimed to investigate the predictive accuracy of the TOPF and examine this word list at an item level against WASI-II scores, using Australian pronunciations. The sample of 219 healthy Australians were aged 18–82 years. Multiple regression analyses were us...
Book
The current study examines the factors underlying pathways from out-of-home care into the criminal justice system. Using a multi-method approach—specifically, court observations, file reviews and qualitative interviews—we found evidence of how histories of trauma and situational factors relating to the care environment interact to increase criminal...
Article
The current study examines the factors underlying pathways from out-of-home care into the criminal justice system. Using a multi-method approach—specifically, court observations, file reviews and qualitative interviews—we found evidence of how histories of trauma and situational factors relating to the care environment interact to increase criminal...
Article
Full-text available
Criminal sentencing is a complex cognitive activity often performed by the unaided mind under suboptimal conditions. As such, sentencers may not behave according to policy, guidelines, or training. We analyzed the distribution of sentences meted out in one year in two different jurisdictions (i.e., England and Wales, and New South Wales, Australia)...
Article
Full-text available
The present study sought to address gaps in knowledge concerning Australian Indigenous and non-Indigenous youth who commit sexual offenses. Developmental histories and onset sexual offense characteristics of Indigenous ( n = 81) and non-Indigenous ( n = 130) adjudicated male youth were compared. Results indicate that, in addition to problems affect...
Article
Full-text available
Children with cognitive impairment in out-of-home care (OOHC) are significantly over-represented in the criminal justice system. Little attention has been given to the connection between those with cognitive impairment who also have a care background and how these combined factors are linked to their criminal behaviour. A qualitative study utilisin...
Article
This article examines the New South Wales Joint Protocol to Reduce the Contact of Young People in Residential OOHC with the Criminal Justice System (2016) from the perspective of residential out-of-home-care providers, police, lawyers and departmental staff involved in the child welfare and criminal justice systems in New South Wales.
Article
Evidence from both Australian and international jurisdictions show that children in residential care are over-represented in the criminal justice system. In the current study, we interviewed 46 professionals who had contact with young people in residential care settings in New South Wales, Australia. Our sample included police officers, residential...
Article
This article presents qualitative data from interviews with 46 welfare and justice professionals to examine the criminalisation of children who go missing within the Out‐Of‐Home‐Care (OOHC) residential environment. Participants had specific experience with children living in residential facilities, either through the direct provision of care servic...
Article
The predictive validity for the Australian Adaptation of the Youth Level of Service/Case Management Inventory was tested in a large sample (N = 4,401) of community-based juvenile offenders in New South Wales, Australia. First, we compared gender and ethnic subgroups on domain, total scores, and predictive validity. Both similarities and modest diff...
Article
Full-text available
Cyberbullying is an increasingly common characteristic of contemporary online communication. The current study surveyed 320 Internet-active young adults and found up to 80% reported engaging in this behavior at least once. In addition, the ability of the general theory of crime and general strain theory to explain cyberbullying perpetration was tes...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims: The Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI, Frisch, 1994) manual states that in most cases QOLI total scores are invalid when two or more of the 16-domain scores are missing. The current study aimed to investigate this guideline. Methods: Two samples were utilised consisting of 259 community-dwelling adults and 144 adults surveyed 12...
Article
Objective: To confirm the construct validity of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 (DASS-21) by investigating the fit of published factor structures in a sample of adults with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (posttraumatic amnesia > 24 hours). Participants: Archival data from 504 patient records at the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Un...
Article
Full-text available
The question of whether there are offenders who specialise in violent offences is one that has been of considerable interest to life course developmental criminology as well as policy makers and the public. The current study investigated this using an administrative dataset of juvenile offenders from New South Wales, Australia. Specifically, it ask...
Article
Full-text available
Empathy is an important competence in our social world, a motivator of prosocial behavior, and thought to develop throughout the second year of life. The current study examined infants' responses to naturalistic peer distress to explore markers of empathy and prosocial behavior in young babies. Seventeen 8-month-old infants participated in a repeat...
Article
Full-text available
The current study uses sentencing data from the New South Wales Children’s Court to examine the impact of Indigenous status, age and sex on two outcomes: custodial status at sentence and the imposition of a detention order. Indigenous youth aged 10–16 were more likely to be in custody at sentence net of controls, although the major determinants of...
Article
Reports an error in "Subgroup differences and implications for contemporary risk-need assessment with juvenile offenders" by Anthony P. Thompson and Andrew McGrath (Law and Human Behavior, 2012[Aug], Vol 36[4], 345-355). There was an error in Table 1 and in the Results section under the Domain Analyses paragraph. In Table 1, there should be the fol...
Article
The Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI, Frisch) is an importance-weighted measure of life satisfaction that has been found to possess adequate psychometric properties in US and clinically-based samples. The current study aimed to investigate the normative distribution, factor structure and key psychometric properties of the QOLI in an Australian gener...
Article
Full-text available
Risk-need assessment is widely accepted as best practice with juvenile offenders and is underpinned by a healthy research literature on risk assessment inventories. Previous studies have found both similarities and differences on risk measures when gender and racial/ethnic subgroups have been compared. Differential validity has been examined, but d...
Article
Full-text available
This study uses propensity score matching to test the proposition that imprisonment deters future criminal activity among juvenile offenders. Using data from all court appearances of juveniles in the NSW Children’s Court (Australia) between 2003 and 2004 (N = 6196), the reoffending of a group of young offenders sentenced to control (i.e. custodial)...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the predictive validity of the Australian Adaptation of the Youth Level of Service/Case Management Inventory (YLS/CMI-AA). The focus was on the subcomponents of the inventory, which represent one static and seven dynamic risk-need domains. Reoffending outcomes within 1 year of the inventory were obtained for a large sample (N =...
Article
Full-text available
The New South Wales Government has made explicit its aim to reduce reoffending by 10 per cent by 2014. Contributing to the knowledge base on reoffending will help government agencies and other groups to provide adequately targeted interventions to help achieve this aim. This article looks at reoffending through the prism of intention to reoffend. I...
Article
Full-text available
The criminal court system remains society's pre-eminent response to criminal activity, despite recent innovations such as youth justice conferences. Little is known, however, about the impact of an appearance before court and, in particular, whether subjective reactions to the court process have any impact on recidivism. The current article reports...
Article
Full-text available
Diversion from court has become a popular solution to perceived weaknesses in the traditional justice system, particularly in recent years with the advent of family group conferences. But evidence for the detrimental effect of court is weak. Previous research into this question shows a number of deficiencies. In particular, the range of controls us...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports the results of a quantitative study conducted in Sydney that investigated subjective reactions to an appearance before the NSW Children's Court. A total of 206 young people were interviewed following their sentencing hearing using a questionnaire that measured the extent to which they perceived their sentence to be a deterrent, t...
Article
This paper argues that juvenile justice policy in Australia is dominated by three key dogmas: that contact with the court system increases the risk of further offending; that restorative justice is more effective than traditional justice in reducing the risk of further offending; and that juvenile involvement in crime is for the most part transient...