Andrew Marsh

Andrew Marsh
NextEra

Doctor of Philosophy

About

17
Publications
975
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203
Citations
Introduction
I am a Measurement Scientist with NextEra Analytics, where I monitor, troubleshoot, and occasionally deploy meteorological devices in support of wind and solar farm development and operation. The devices I monitor include wind met towers, solar met stations, SoDARs, and LiDARs. I earned my physics Ph.D. working on solar observation planning and data analysis with the NuSTAR satellite (Harrison et al. 2013) My analysis with NuSTAR focused on transient detection in the quiet Sun and nanoflare parameter constraints in active regions.

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
We present the first observations of quiescent active regions (ARs) using the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), a focusing hard X-ray telescope capable of studying faint solar emission from high-temperature and non-thermal sources. We analyze the first directly imaged and spectrally resolved X-rays above 2 keV from non-flaring ARs, ob...
Presentation
Full-text available
We present the first results of a search for transient X-ray emission in quiet solar regions with the NuSTAR astrophysics satellite. Transient brightenings of 10^24-10^27 ergs, or "nanoflares," have been observed as thermal emission in EUV and soft X-rays, but never in hard X-rays (HXRs) due to lack of sensitivity. Frequent nanoflares could account...
Article
Full-text available
We present results from the the first campaign of dedicated solar observations undertaken by the \textit{Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray} ({\em NuSTAR}) hard X-ray telescope. Designed as an astrophysics mission, {\em NuSTAR} nonetheless has the capability of directly imaging the Sun at hard X-ray energies ($>$3~keV) with an increase in sensit...
Poster
Full-text available
We present a timing analysis of the Sun with the NuSTAR hard X-ray (HXR) telescope, searching for transient brightenings / nanoflares in the quiet Sun and active regions. A substantial amount of flare energy goes into accelerating electrons. HXR observations are a crucial tool for understanding this non-thermal emission and the energy release in fl...
Poster
Full-text available
We present an investigation of RHESSI flares with a distinct "early rise" or "pre-impulsive" phase in which low-energy X-ray flux (6-12 keV) increases ~minutes before more energetic (25-50 keV), impulsive emission. It is currently unclear what the dominant heating mechanism is for this class of events; studies have claimed chromospheric heating by...
Article
Full-text available
Much evidence suggests that the solar corona is heated impulsively, meaning that nanoflares may be ubiquitous in quiet and active regions (ARs). Hard X-ray (HXR) observations with unprecedented sensitivity >3 keV are now enabled by focusing instruments. We analyzed data from the Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) rocket and the Nuclear Spec...
Preprint
Full-text available
Much evidence suggests that the solar corona is heated impulsively, meaning that nanoflares may be ubiquitous in quiet and active regions (ARs). Hard X-ray (HXR) observations with unprecedented sensitivity $>$3~keV are now enabled by focusing instruments. We analyzed data from the \textit{Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI)} rocket and the \...
Article
Full-text available
We present the first results of a search for transient hard X-ray (HXR) emission in the quiet solar corona with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) satellite. While NuSTAR was designed as an astrophysics mission, it can observe the Sun above 2 keV with unprecedented sensitivity due to its pioneering use of focusing optics. NuSTAR fir...
Article
We report a NuSTAR observation of a solar microflare, SOL2015-09-01T04. Although it was too faint to be observed by the GOES X-ray Sensor, we estimate the event to be an A0.1 class flare in brightness. This microflare, with only 5 counts per second per detector observed by RHESSI, is fainter than any hard X-ray (HXR) flare in the existing literatur...
Article
Full-text available
NuSTAR is a highly sensitive focusing hard X-ray (HXR) telescope and has observed several small microflares in its initial solar pointings. In this paper, we present the first joint observation of a microflare with NuSTAR and Hinode/XRT on 2015 April 29 at $\sim$11:29 UT. This microflare shows heating of material to several million Kelvin, observed...
Article
We present observations of the occulted active region AR 12222 during the third Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) solar campaign on 2014 December 11, with concurrent Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/AIA and FOXSI-2 sounding rocket observations. The active region produced a medium-size solar flare 1 day before the observations, at ~18 U...
Presentation
We present imaging spectroscopy of the Sun with the NuSTAR hard X-ray (HXR) telescope, an astrophysics mission that uses focusing optics to directly image X-rays between ~2-80 keV. Although not optimized for solar observations, NuSTAR’s high sensitivity can probe previously inaccessible X-ray emission from the Sun – crucial for searching for high t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We present a study of the heating in AR12333 due to small microflares between 10:30 and 13:30UT on 29 April 2015. This region is well observed in EUV by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) as well as Hinode’s X-ray Telescope (XRT) operating in a higher cadence mode, switching through the five thicker filters (sensi...
Poster
Full-text available
We present the NuSTAR sensitivity to quiet Sun (QS) transient events, which have been seen in wavelengths from UV to soft X-rays. Although not optimized for solar observations, NuSTAR can observe X-ray emission from the Sun with unprecedented sensitivity in the hard X-ray range; this is crucial for detecting individual events in the quiet corona. W...
Presentation
Full-text available
We present spectroscopy of the Sun with the NuSTAR hard X-ray (HXR) telescope, searching for high temperature and non-thermal emission in the “non-flaring” Sun. A substantial amount of flare energy goes into accelerating electrons. HXR observations are a crucial tool for understanding this non-thermal emission and the energy release in flares. RHES...
Poster
Full-text available
The efficient processes that accelerate particles in solar flares are not currently understood. Hard X-rays (HXRs) are one of the best diagnostics of flare-accelerated electrons, and therefore of acceleration processes. Past and current solar HXR observers rely on indirect Fourier imaging and thus lack the necessary sensitivity and imaging dynamic...
Article
The February 15, 2011 solar flare was the first X-class flare of Solar Cycle 24, and as such has received much attention in the literature. This flare has many interesting features, including the presence of a sun-quake, a large coronal mass ejection, and a distinct “pre-impulsive” phase during which the thermal emission rises appreciably before an...

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