Andrew J J MacIntosh

Andrew J J MacIntosh
Kyoto University | Kyodai · Wildlife Research Center

M. A., D. Sc.

About

122
Publications
25,808
Reads
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1,502
Citations
Citations since 2016
78 Research Items
1266 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
Introduction
My research investigates factors important to parasitic disease transmission in wildlife, both intrinsic and extrinsic to host individuals, and attempts to determine health and fitness costs associated with infection. Such costs can be difficult to observe in the wild, so I explore novel approaches like applying fractal analysis to animal behavior as a bio-indicator of health in free-ranging animals (e.g. primates and penguins), in relation to parasitism and various other ecological challenges.
Additional affiliations
April 2017 - present
Kyoto University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
April 2011 - present
Kyoto University Primate Research Institute
Position
  • Instructor
Description
  • Comparative Wildlife Research Workshop (Kyoto University Primate Research Institute): developing skills in the communication of scientific research
April 2011 - present
Kyoto University Primate Research Institute
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Description
  • dynamics and epidemiology of parasitic infection and disease outcomes in wild primates; measuring complexity in patterns of behavioural organization, especially in relation to various ecological challenges as systemic stressors
Education
April 2007 - November 2010
Kyoto University
Field of study
  • Primatology

Publications

Publications (122)
Article
Full-text available
Group living is beneficial for individuals, but also comes with costs. One such cost is the increased possibility of pathogen transmission because increased numbers or frequencies of social contacts are often associated with increased parasite abundance or diversity. The social structure of a group or population is paramount to patterns of infectio...
Article
Full-text available
Studies on drawing often focused on spatial aspects of the finished products. Here, the drawing behaviour was studied by analysing its intermittent process, between drawing (i.e. marking a surface) and interruption (i.e. a pause in the marking gesture). To assess how this intermittence develops with age, we collected finger-drawings on a touchscree...
Article
Environmental contamination is one of the major causes of biodiversity loss. Wetlands are particularly susceptible to contamination and species inhabiting these habitats are subjected to pollutants during sensitive phases of their development. In this study, tadpoles of a widespread amphibian, the spined toad (Bufo spinosus), were exposed to enviro...
Article
Full-text available
Identifying how infection modifies host behaviours that determine social contact networks is important for understanding heterogeneity in infectious disease dynamics. Here, we investigate whether group social behaviour is modified during bacterial infection in fruit flies ( Drosophila melanogaster ) according to pathogen species, infectious dose, h...
Preprint
Full-text available
Identifying how infection modifies host behaviours that determine social contact networks is important for understanding heterogeneity in infectious disease dynamics. Here, we investigate whether group social behaviour is modified during bacterial infection in Drosophila melanogaster , an established system for behavioural genetics, according to pa...
Article
Full-text available
Atypical tooth wear, including macroscopically visible striations on anterior teeth and within root grooves on posterior teeth, are often regarded as evidence of non‐masticatory, tool use behavior in fossil hominins. Both these types of dental tissue loss are often considered unique to the genus Homo and suggested to be the earliest evidence of hum...
Preprint
Nature-based tourism supports the protection of the mountain gorilla ecosystem, benefiting humans and wildlife populations living therein. Therefore, assessing to what degree the presence and proximity of tourists affect wildlife is important to ensure long-term benefits and to avoid immediate costs, such as the increased risk of pathogen spillover...
Poster
During the first years, mothers represent the strongest social bond for many primates, as they provide care, food, and protection to their offspring, and facilitates their interaction with the physical and social environment. The way in which mothers take care of their offspring (i.e., maternal style) can vary depending on attributes of the mother-...
Article
Social structure can regulate information and pathogen transmission via social contact or proximity, which ultimately affects individual fitness. In theory, the social relationships that mediate information transmission also favor the spread of socially transmitted pathogens, creating a tradeoff between them. However, the mechanisms underlying the...
Preprint
Full-text available
Studies on drawing often focused on spatial aspects of the finished products. Here, the drawing behaviour was studied by analysing its intermittent process, between drawing (i.e. marking a surface) and interruption (i.e. a pause in the marking gesture). To assess how this intermittence develops with age, we collected finger-drawings on a touchscree...
Article
Full-text available
Long-range signaling, such as acoustic communication, is best understood within the broader context of all potential receivers. Exactly what kind of information is transmitted or obtained is a matter of debate. To address this issue, we describe the communication network of a population of wild siamangs (Symphalangus syndactylus), small territorial...
Article
Full-text available
Animal communication has long been thought to be subject to pressures and constraints associated with social relationships. However, our understanding of how the nature and quality of social relationships relates to the use and evolution of communication is limited by a lack of directly comparable methods across multiple levels of analysis. Here, w...
Article
Metamorphosis is a widespread developmental process that involves considerable changes in morphology, habitat use, ecology and behaviour between early developmental (larval) stages and adult forms. Among amphibians, anuran larvae (tadpoles) undergo massive morphological and ecological changes during their development, with early stages characterize...
Preprint
Full-text available
Group living is beneficial for individuals, but also comes with costs. One such cost is the increased possibility of pathogen transmission, because increased numbers or frequencies of social contacts is often associated with increased parasite abundance or diversity. The social structure of a group or population has been shown to be paramount to pa...
Article
Full-text available
Intense selection pressure from parasites on free-living animals has resulted in behavioral adaptations that help potential hosts avoid sources of infection. In primates, such “behavioral immunity” is expressed in different contexts and may vary according to the ecology of the host, the nature of the infectious agent, and the individual itself. In...
Article
Full-text available
Parasites are important components of ecosystems, influencing trophic networks, competitive interactions and biodiversity patterns. Nonetheless, we are not nearly close to disentangling their complex roles in natural systems. Southeast Asia falls within global areas targeted as most likely to source parasites with zoonotic potential, where high rat...
Article
Full-text available
Gaze sensitivity allows us to interpret the visual perspective of others, inferring their intentions and attentional states. In order to clarify the evolutionary history of this ability, we assessed the response of free-ranging Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) to human gaze in three contexts: threat (Experiment 1), cooperation (Experiment 2), and...
Article
Full-text available
In several species, rank predicts access to food, and subordinates may need specific behavioural strategies to get a share of resources. This may be especially important in despotic species, where resources are strongly biased in favour of dominants and subordinates may more strongly rely on specific tactics to maximize food intake. Here, we compar...
Article
Full-text available
Primates live in complex social systems with social structures ranging from more to less despotic. In less despotic species, dominance might impose fewer constraints on social choices, tolerance is greater than in despotic species and subordinates may have little need to include novel food items in the diet (i.e. neophilia), as contest food competi...
Chapter
Soil-transmitted helminths (STH) remain neglected tropical parasites, despite infecting millions of people worldwide and being among the most common parasites regulating wildlife populations. Although typically reported in coproscopic surveys of nonhuman primates (NHP), little is known about factors regulating STH diversity and distribution, or how...
Article
Primate parasite study is an important subject in primate research, especially with the ongoing threats from anthropogenic disturbances such as land conversion and deforestation. This study is conducted to investigate the occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in primates of the Lower Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary (LKWS), Sabah, Malaysia. Feca...
Article
Play is widespread across mammalian taxa, but species strongly vary in the ways they play. In less despotic primate species (i.e., with less steep dominance hierarchies , less severe conflicts, and more reconciliation), play has been described as being more frequent, cooperative, and freely expressed. To study the link between social play and domin...
Article
Social information and socially transmitted pathogens are governed by social structure, and also shape social interactions. However, information and infection are rarely investigated as interactive factors driving social evolution. We propose exactly such an integrative framework, drawing attention to mechanisms of social phenotypic plasticity for...
Article
Background Anaesthesia is often required in common marmosets undergoing various procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate anaesthetic and cardiopulmonary effects of alfaxalone, alfaxalone‐ketamine and alfaxalone‐butorphanol‐medetomidine in common marmosets. Methods The following treatments were repeatedly administered to seven female commo...
Article
Full-text available
1. Changes in marine ecosystems are easier to detect in upper-level predators, like seabirds, which integrate trophic interactions throughout the food web. 2. Here, we examined whether diving parameters and complexity in the temporal organisation of diving behaviour of little penguins (Eudyptula minor) are influenced by sea surface temperature (SS...
Article
Full-text available
Parasites constitute a major selective pressure which has shaped animal behaviour through evolutionary time. One adaption to parasites consists of recognizing and avoiding substrates or cues that indicate their presence. Among substrates harbouring infectious agents, faeces are known to elicit avoidance behaviour in numerous animal species. However...
Preprint
Social structure can regulate information and pathogen transmission via social contact or proximity, which ultimately affects individual fitness. In theory, the same network properties that favor social information transmission also favor the spread of socially-transmitted pathogens, creating a trade-off between them. The mechanisms underlying the...
Article
Full-text available
Males of Enterobius (Colobenterobius) serratus Hasegawa et al., 2003 (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) are described for the first time based on six individuals collected from the feces of proboscis monkeys, Nasalis larvatus, in the Lower Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary, Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. The males show identical cephalic morphology to females, being re...
Chapter
Full-text available
Global population expansion has increased interactions and conflicts between humans and nonhuman primates over shared ecological space and resources. Such ecological overlap, along with our shared evolutionary histories, makes human-nonhuman primate interfaces hot spots for the acquisition and transmission of parasites. In this chapter, we bring to...
Article
Ethnopharmacological relevance: Primates forage on a variety of plant parts to balance their dietary intake to meet requirements of energy, nutrition and maintenance, however the reason(s) leading them to ingest some plants which have no nutritional value and/or contain bioactive or even toxic secondary metabolites is recently gaining closer atten...
Article
Background: Biological information about captive Japanese macaques, including hematology and blood chemistry, is still lacking despite the fact that ethological and ecological data have accumulated during decades of field research. Methods: Hematological (511 examinations of 280 Japanese macaques) and blood chemistry data (between 33 and 284 exa...
Poster
Full-text available
New framework linking the adaptive system of disgust to conservation issues by focusing on eco-tourism and human-wildlife conflict
Article
Full-text available
Strongyles are commonly reported parasites in studies of primate parasite biodiversity. Among them, nodule worm species are often overlooked as a serious concern despite having been observed to cause serious disease in nonhuman primates and humans. In this study, we investigated whether strongyles found in Bornean primates are the nodule worm Oesop...
Chapter
Full-text available
Primate Research and Conservation in the Anthropocene - edited by Alison M. Behie January 2019
Article
Full-text available
Cambridge Core - Ecology and Conservation - Primate Research and Conservation in the Anthropocene - edited by Alison M. Behie
Article
Full-text available
Animals have evolved a wide range of behaviours that act as barriers to decrease the risk of parasite infection. Faecal avoidance may, for example, limit contact with orofaecally transmitted parasites, such as gastrointestinal nematodes. When present in faeces, however, nematode eggs need to mature before reaching their infective stage. If strategi...
Article
Full-text available
Lemuricola (Protenterobius) nycticebi is the only pinworm species known to infect strepsirrhine primates outside Africa, and the only pinworm species yet described in slow lorises. Here, we provided a detailed morphological comparison of female and male worms, and a rst description of fourth-stage larvae collected from free-living slow lorises (Nyc...
Presentation
Under climate change, seabirds can provide a means to monitor rapid changes in the marine environment. An emerging approach uses fractal analysis to assess structural complexity in behavioural sequences, yet identifying how such complexity is affected by intrinsic and extrinsic parameters remains underexplored. Here, we examined how diving paramete...
Article
Full-text available
In myriad biological systems, multiple lines of evidence indicate that modularity, wherein parts of a network are organized into modules such as subgroups in animal networks, may affect social transmission processes. In animal societies, there is increased interest in understanding variation in the effects of modularity on transmission as it may pr...
Article
Full-text available
Threats from parasites and pathogens are ubiquitous, and many use pathways that exploit host trophic interactions for their transmission. As such, host organisms have evolved a behavioural immune system to facilitate contamination-risk assessment and avoidance of potential contaminants in various contexts, including feeding. Detecting pathogen thre...
Article
The Southern Ocean is currently experiencing major environmental changes, including in sea‐ice cover. Such changes strongly influence ecosystem structure and functioning and affect the survival and reproduction of predators such as seabirds. These effects are likely mediated by reduced availability of food resources. As such, seabirds are reliable...
Article
Gastrointestinal nematodes are known to be one of the most economically important parasites in livestock production. In order to test whether fractal analysis of behaviour can be used as a diagnostic tool for detection of infected animals, we investigated fractal patterns in the behavioural activity of domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in relation to str...
Presentation
Due to ongoing climate change, it is necessary to understand how ecosystems and food webs are affected by these environmental changes. As upper-level predators, seabirds’ behaviour provides a way to monitor changes occurring in the marine environment, but identifying how the complexity in the temporal structure of behaviour depend on intrinsic and...
Article
Full-text available
Within host communities, related species are more likely to share common parasitic agents, and as a result, morphological similarities have led researchers to conclude that parasites infecting closely related hosts within a community represent a single species. However, genetic diversity within parasite genera and host range remain poorly investiga...
Poster
Due to ongoing climate change, it is necessary to understand how ecosystems will react and more particularly, how species may cope with the challenges of living in unstable systems. As top predator, seabirds' behaviour provides a way to monitor changes occurring in the marine environment, but identifying how the temporal structure and complexity of...
Poster
Due to ongoing climate change, it is necessary to understand how ecosystems will react and more particularly, how species may cope with the challenges of living in unstable systems. As top predator, seabirds' behaviour provides a way to monitor changes occurring in the marine environment, but identifying how the temporal structure and complexity of...
Article
Full-text available
Avoiding biological contaminants is a well-known manifestation of the adaptive system of disgust. In theory, animals evolved with such a system to prevent pathogen and parasite infection. Bodily products are human-universal disgust elicitors, but whether they also elicit avoidance behaviour in non-human primates has yet to be tested. Here, we repor...
Article
Full-text available
Among nonhuman primates, the evolutionary underpinnings of variation in social structure remain debated, with both ancestral relationships and adaptation to current conditions hypothesized to play determining roles. Here we assess whether interspecific variation in higher-order aspects of female macaque (genus: Macaca) dominance and grooming social...
Poster
Full-text available
We report the outcomes of a 10-year Franco-Japanese collaborative research (2006 - present) on reproductive energetics and sexual signaling in the Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata). The main objectives of our research was to better understand the physiological and socio-environmental factors modulating female reproduction, but also to provide a com...
Article
Objectively measuring the effects of parasitism on animal health is challenging, especially in the wild. Analyses of behavioural organization are increasingly used for this purpose, to identify animals in pathological or otherwise challenged states. Here, we investigated the possible impact of gastrointestinal helminth infection on the behaviour of...
Article
Full-text available
Little penguins (Eudyptula minor) have one of the widest geographic distributions among penguins, exposing them to variable ecological constraints across their range, which in turn can affect their foraging behaviour. Presumably, behavioural flexibility exists to allow animals to adapt to prevailing environmental conditions throughout their foragin...
Chapter
Full-text available
Pathogens are infectious agents that cause disease. Numerous microorganisms and multicellular parasites are pathogenic in primates. Pathogen transmission can be direct or indirect, the latter case typically requiring a trophic interaction between successive hosts in the life cycle of the pathogen. The distinction between infectious agents that do n...
Chapter
Full-text available
Coevolution encompasses the reciprocal evolutionary changes that interacting species impose on one another. Due to their intimate relationship, host–parasite interactions are particularly suitable to understand the interplay between ecological and genetic factors leading to coevolutionary associations. Reciprocal traits under coevolutionary selecti...