Andrew J. Koh

Andrew J. Koh
Yale University | YU · Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

Bachelor of Science, Doctor of Philosophy

About

16
Publications
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Introduction
My research focuses on cultural interactions, social complexity, and ecologies of the past through the lens of technology, innovation, and craft. This by necessity incorporates the relationship between people and their environments. I’ve developed a transdisciplinary method to uncover the sourcing, production, exchange, and consumption of these goods - e.g. textiles, wines, aromatics, drugs - and the effects these activities had on ancient cultures and ecologies.

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
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Despite its ubiquity in historical and mythological narratives, the ancient region of southern Phokis in central Greece has been approached primarily as a backdrop for more prominent neighbors (e.g. Delphi, Boiotia), whose roles have been codified in extant histories. Archaeological research has been likewise limited, with the result that southern...
Chapter
Organic residue analysis (via GCMS) from vessels excavated at Alatzomouri Pefka, Crete.
Article
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Archaeologists and historians have routinely attributed “branded” goods to particular regions and cultural groups, often without rigorous analysis. Phoenician cedar oil is perhaps one of the best known examples from antiquity. Hellenistic Tel Kedesh in the Upper Galilee region of the Levant is particularly relevant for these discussions by virtue o...
Article
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Often treated as an accessory science, organic residue analysis (ORA) has the capacity to illuminate otherwise hidden aspects of ancient technology, culture, and economy, and therein can play a central role in archaeological inquiry. Through ORA, both the intact vessel freshly excavated from a tomb and the sherd tucked away in a museum storage clos...
Article
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This report presents the architecture of the storage rooms found during the 2013 and 2015 excavations within the Middle Bronze Age Canaanite palace at Tel Kabri in present-day Israel, as well as the ceramic finds within them, and the initial results of the petrographic and organic residue analyses. We hope that this detailed preliminary report can...
Article
Full-text available
The turn of the 12th century B.C. traditionally has been cast as a period of turmoil and upheaval in the eastern Mediterranean. Although recent scholarship qualifies “the Collapse,” the dominant narrative continues to be one of disruption, regression, and isolation. East Crete has been painted with a similar brush. Yet the century that followed the...
Article
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Bronze Age Clothing in Minoan Crete was multicolored and made from intricately woven textiles. Until now, our only evidence related to the colors in the textiles came from the study of costume in wall paintings. Fortunately, recent research has revealed that several different dyes were produced in Minoan Crete. Clothing is depicted in frescoes and...
Article
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Here we explore aspects of Canaanite palatial economy through an analysis of finds from the Middle Bronze Age palace at Tel Kabri, a 34 ha site located in the western Galilee of modern day Israel. The palace was founded in the middle part of the MBA I period, and continued without interruption until an advanced part of the MBA II period. Despite th...
Article
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Scholars have long been aware of tombs in the western Siteia foothills of Crete, dating to the end of the Bronze Age and yielding an array of notable finds. While detailed analyses of these finds have been invaluable, the settlements to which the tombs were tied have proven elusive. Using topographic and GIS studies, this article analyzes the broad...
Article
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Scholars have for generations recognized the importance of wine production, distribution, and consumption in relation to second millennium BC palatial complexes in the Mediterranean and Near East. However, direct archaeological evidence has rarely been offered, despite the prominence of ancient viticulture in administrative clay tablets, visual med...
Article
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Aphrodite's Kephali is a small hilltop site in Eastern Crete. Its pottery indicates that it was inhabited during Early Minoan I (EM I), ca. 3200-2700 B.C. The fortified site has a considerable amount of storage, including nine pithoi. The analysis by gas chromatography of sherds from the site indicates that vessels contained olive oil and wine. The...
Article
This archaeological project aims to use the most recent techniques in organic chemistry and mapping to better understand typological and spatial function in Bronze Age Crete. Excavations in the Neopalatial settlement at Mochlos in eastern Crete have recovered the complete plan of an intriguing building, C.7. Situated directly behind the modern chur...

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Projects (4)
Project
Tel Kabri was the center of a Middle Bronze Age polity in the Western Galilee. The aim of the Tel Kabri Project is to gain insights into Canaanite palatial economy, which has been little studied until now, and thereby fill a void in the intercultural study of the role of palaces in complex societies. Another aim is to investigate the connections between the Aegean (Minoan and Cycladic) cultures of the Levant during the Middle Bronze Age, leading to the painting of Aegean-style wall paintings at the palace of Kabri. A third, recent aim, has been the understanding of collapse of palatial polities using the case study of Tel Kabri.