Andrew W. Kandel

Andrew W. Kandel
Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften · The Role of Culture in Early Expansions of Humans (ROCEEH)

PhD

About

110
Publications
34,458
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,172
Citations
Introduction
My current field work focuses on the Levantine corridor in Israel, the Armenian Highlands, and the West Coast region of South Africa. My research emphasizes the analysis of diachronic settlement patterns, landscape archaeology, Pleistocene lifeways, modes of subsistence, environmental reconstruction and coastal adaptations. I also study the development of personal ornaments and the emergence of ochre use in Africa. My work examines changes in culture related to new technological and subsistence behaviors.
Additional affiliations
January 2008 - February 2022
University of Tuebingen
Position
  • Project Archaeologist
Description
  • Employed by the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences and Humanities in the ROCEEH project
January 2008 - present
Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften
Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften
Position
  • Project Archaeologist

Publications

Publications (110)
Technical Report
Full-text available
In this 20th newsletter, ROCEEH takes you on a little trip around the world. We tell the story of stone technologies in southern Italy at the transition from Middle to Upper Paleolithic, the paleoenvironment of Homo erectus in Indonesia, and a unique eyed needle from the Armenian Highlands. We hope you enjoy!
Technical Report
Full-text available
In the 19th ROCEEH newsletter, we look at geographic methods for the study of habitat change, the analysis of stone artifacts from the Upper Paleolithic in Armenia, the research history of one of the most important Paleolithic sites in Germany (the UNESCO World Heritage site Geißenklösterle in the Swabian Jura), and the cognitive abilities of o...
Article
Excavated from 2009 to 2019 by the Tübingen-Armenian Paleolithic Project, Aghitu-3 Cave is the only stratified Upper Paleolithic site in Armenia. Sedimentary deposits range from 39,000 to 24,000 calibrated years before present (ka cal BP). The main Paleolithic occupations occurred during the accumulation of Archaeological Horizon (AH) VI between 36...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The 18th newsletter focuses on the diet of Paranthropus boisei and how environmental conditions and technical capabilities affected it. We report on ROCEEH‘s collaboration with ARIADNEplus, a large-scale European project on the scientific infrastructure of archaeological data. We also announce the opening of the exhibition “Being Human // The Origi...
Article
Despite advances in our understanding of the geographic and temporal scope of the Paleolithic record, we know remarkably little about the evolutionary and ecological consequences of changes in human behavior. Recent inquiries suggest that human evolution reflects a long history of interconnections between the behavior of humans and their surroundin...
Article
Full-text available
Die Forschungsstelle ROCEEH (The Role of Culture in Early Expansions of Humans) ist ein Projekt der Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften* mit dem Ziel, das frühe kulturelle Erbe der Menschheit zu erkunden, in einen Kontext zu stellen und zu bewahren. ROCEEH erforscht die Geschichte der Menschheit und ihrer frühen Ausbreitungen von drei Millione...
Article
Full-text available
The research center ROCEEH (The Role of Culture in Early Expansions of Humans) is a project of the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences and Humanities* whose aim is to discover, contextualize and preserve the deep past of humankind’s cultural heritage. ROCEEH explores the history of humanity and its early expansions between three million and 20,000 years...
Article
Databases are ubiquitous in the natural sciences and can include anything from a simple, thematically restricted table to a complex, interdisciplinary network. Despite their widespread use, many questions remain unresolved about their growth, analytical function, interoperability, and sustainability. To examine current trends in this dynamic field,...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This 17th issue of the ROCEEH newsletter focuses on early human migrations in Island Southeast Asia by examining microscopic traces of use-wear on stone artifacts. Next, we introduce the ROAD Summary Data Sheet, which provides an overview of locality data stored in the ROAD Database. Finally we discuss the latest developments in an agent-based mode...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The 16th issue of the ROCEEH newsletter focuses on the climate of the Iberian Peninsula during the first wave of human expansion into Western Europe. We also take a closer look at Paleolithic mobile art in Central Europe and present a session report from INQUA 2019 in Dublin, Ireland. All ROCEEH newsletters are available on www.roceeh.net
Article
Full-text available
Excavations at Aghitu-3 Cave in Armenia revealed stratified Upper Palaeolithic archaeological horizons (AHs), spanning from 39 to 36,000 cal BP (AH VII) to 29–24,000 cal BP (AH III) and from which we identified the sources of 1120 obsidian artifacts. Not only does AH III—deposited at the onset of the Last Glacial Maximum—have the most artifacts fro...
Article
Full-text available
Grey wolves (Canis lupus) are one of the few large terrestrial carnivores that have maintained a wide geographic distribution across the Northern Hemisphere throughout the Pleistocene and Holocene. Recent genetic studies have suggested that, despite this continuous presence, major demographic changes occurred in wolf populations between the late Pl...
Technical Report
Full-text available
In the 15th issue of ROCEEH’s newsletter, we address the difficulties in defining Aurignacian industries and their spatio-temporal variability. We present our latest findings on the final phase of the Middle Stone Age in southern Africa. Finally we report on geomorphological field work associated with Sibudu Rock Shelter in South Africa and a ROAD...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal adaptations have become an important topic in discussions about the evolution and dispersal of Homo sapiens. However, the actual distribution and potential relevance of coastal adaptations (broadly, the use of coastal resources and settlement along shorelines) in these processes remains debated, as is the claim that Neanderthals exhibited s...
Technical Report
Full-text available
In this 14th issue of ROCEEH’s newsletter, we begin by examining the origin of ocher use in Africa. From there, we establish a definition of what cumulative culture means and explore when it began. These articles are followed by reports about three conferences co-organized by ROCEEH: 1) “KULT-UR-MENSCH”; 2) “Computer Applications in Archaeology”; a...
Article
Full-text available
While the earliest evidence for ochre use is very sparse, the habitual use of ochre by hominins appeared about 140,000 years ago and accompanied them ever since. Here, we present an overview of archaeological sites in southwestern Germany, which yielded remains of ochre. We focus on the artifacts belonging exclusively to anatomically modern humans...
Technical Report
Full-text available
In its first brochure about ROAD, the ROCEEH research team described the technical aspects of its large-scale, multidisciplinary database which contains data about the last three million years of human history. In this second brochure, we follow up by focusing on the practical applications that ROAD offers its users. ROAD provides a synopsis of pre...
Article
Full-text available
Sefunim Cave, Mount Carmel, Israel was previously excavated in the 1960s and is one of the main sites known for the occurrence of the cultural entity termed the Levantine Aurignacian. Renewed excavations at Sefunim Cave provide new insights into the Late Pleistocene occupations of the site and reveal a rich Epipaleolithic layer, in addition to the...
Chapter
Full-text available
Aghitu-3 Cave is the first stratified Upper Paleolithic (UP) cave site discovered in Armenia. The site is situated at an elevation of 1601 m in the southern Armenian Highlands and has yielded three intact archaeological horizons. The site has an excellent preservation of paleoecological archives, which allow for a comprehensive interpretation of th...
Article
With its well-preserved archaeological and environmental records, Aghitu-3 Cave permits us to examine the settlement patterns of the Upper Paleolithic (UP) people who inhabited the Armenian Highlands. We also test whether settlement of the region between ∼39–24,000 cal BP relates to environmental variability. The earliest evidence occurs in archaeo...
Article
Geoarchaeological research at Baaz Rockshelter focuses on reconstructing geogenic and anthropogenic formation processes at the site and examining post-depositional alterations of the archaeological record. Baaz is set in a rockshelter at the base of a limestone cliff and its archaeological sequence includes seven layers documenting the repeated use...
Chapter
Full-text available
A joint research programme based at the universities of Munich and Tiibingen focuses on primary animal domestication in the Upper Euphrates Basin. To gain a better understanding ofthe onset of the Neolithic, the project also examines the preceding Palaeolithic ofneighbouring regions. This approach affords afuller picture ofvariability among faunal...
Article
Full-text available
The Middle Stone Age (MSA) of Africa documents the earliest and longest record of marine resource use and coastal settlements by modern humans. Here, we provide a long-term and evolutionary perspective of these behaviors. We propose a definition of " coastal adaptations " rooted in the principles of evolutionary biology as a workable analytical dev...
Technical Report
Full-text available
ROCEEH Evaluation 2016 Appendix A – Status Report I) Publications 2015-2008 3 a. Summary: Publications ranked according to peer review process in numbers 3 b. List of publications ranked according to peer review process 5 c. Summary: Publications in thematic order in numbers 43 d. List of publications in thematic order 45  Hominin Ecospace / Reso...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The research center “The Role of Culture in Early Expansions of Humans” (ROCEEH) is a long-term project of the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences and Humanities. ROCEEH aims to reconstruct the trajectory of human evolution in Africa and Eurasia between 3 million and 20,000 years before present. The project focuses on three different fields of expansion...
Article
Full-text available
The Tübingen-Damaskus Ausgrabungs-und Survey Projekt (TDASP) conducted Paleolithic field work in the Damascus Province of western Syria between 1999 and 2010. The TDASP team excavated four stratified sites dating to the Middle Paleolithic, Upper Paleolithic and Epipaleolithic. Here we report on Wadi Mushkuna Rockshelter, a well stratified Middle Pa...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
During the Late Pleistocene, modern humans expanded out of Africa and inhabited Eurasia for the first time. To better understand the context of this process in the Armenian Highlands and determine how climate affected the behavior of these early modern humans, we collected sediments from the Upper Paleolithic archaeological cave site Aghitu-3. This...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Different layers of digital information about the landscape are assembled to derive a geomorphological map. From left to right: WorldView-2 panchromatic scene (0.5 m ground resolution), soil lithologic analyses, WorldView-2 optical sensor (2 m), SAR Image (TerraSAR-X; 3 m), geomorphological mapping.
Article
Full-text available
The Middle Stone Age (MSA) of southern Africa represents a period during which anatomically modern humans adopted a series of diverse cultural innovations. Researchers generally attribute these behavioral changes to environmental, neurological, or demographic causes, but none of these alone offers a satisfactory explanation. Even as patterns at sit...
Article
Full-text available
Hoedjiespunt 1 has long been recognized as one of the earliest Middle Stone Age (MSA) shell-bearing sites on the southwestern Cape coast. Together with the closely adjacent and roughly contemporary site at Sea Harvest, and the extensively documented site of Ysterfontein, Hoedjiespunt provides a record of MSA people’s adaptations to coastal environm...
Chapter
Full-text available
The Middle Stone Age (MSA) of sub-Saharan Africa currently provides the earliest and longest record of marine resource exploitation by modern humans. Here we present data on coastal settlement systems from our excavations at the shellfishbearing MSA locality of Hoedjiespunt 1 (HDP1), Western Cape, South Africa. We also review recent advances in res...
Chapter
Full-text available
While the Armenian Highlands have benefited from a longer history of research into the Early and Middle Paleolithic occupations of this region, its Upper Paleolithic settlement has only recently begun to come into focus. With this brief contribution we summarize new archaeological data from two high elevation sites that together span the majority o...
Chapter
Full-text available
Excavations in 2009 and 2010 at Aghitu–3 Cave in the Syunik Province of southern Armenia yield new insights into the Upper Paleolithic settlement of the Armenian Highlands. The site is situated at an elevation of 1601 m in a side valley of the Vorotan River. The river cuts down through Pleistocene basalt flows and provides a corridor for the moveme...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this study we detect and discuss possible find locations of Palaeolithic artefacts in the intra-montane Mugello basin (Italy), investigating landforms and the respective landscape forming processes based on soil erosion dynamics. The recent fluvial terrace landscape of the basin shows three main Pleistocene terraces with several Middle and Upper...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we analyze faunal data from southern Africa in order to explore the nature and extent of variability in human hunting strategies and diet breadth during the Middle Stone Age (MSA). Our analysis incorporates data from eight sites that span marine isotope stages (MIS) 6–3 (∼170–40 ka). The sample includes both coastal and inland sites;...
Article
Full-text available
Report on the second ESHE meeting in Bordeaux, September 2012.