Andrew Hoskins

Andrew Hoskins
University of Glasgow | UofG · College of Social Sciences

PhD

About

100
Publications
40,643
Reads
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1,953
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Introduction
Founding Co-Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Digital War. Founding Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Memory Studies. Founding Co-Editor: Palgrave Macmillan Memory Studies Book Series and the Routledge Media, War & Security Book Series. Latest books: (Ed.) Digital Memory Studies: Media Pasts in Transition (Routledge 2018); (Co-Ed.) Trump's Media War (Palgrave 2019).
Additional affiliations
April 2011 - present
University of Glasgow
Position
  • Interdisciplinary Research Professor

Publications

Publications (100)
Chapter
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This introductory chapter maps the key concepts, issues and debates for a Digital Memory Studies. It places media and memory in a recent historical context of the two twentieth century ‘memory booms’ and sets out the character of today’s third boom in memory and the challenges for media and memory studies in responding to these transformations. I a...
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This chapter explores the rise of a digital multitude and the memory of the multitude as a challenge to previous formations of memory imagined as ‘collective’, but also as a solution to the re-thinking of individual and social relations now blurred through their immersion in the shadow archive. I examine some of the basis for the development of the...
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Screen media are increasingly a pervasive feature of our new memory landscape. Inside the museum the screen has moved from being supplementary to artifacts, to becoming a museal object in its own right, to being removed altogether (through the use of projections onto surfaces and architecture). But what do the media of memory reveal about curatoria...
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This chapter takes " mediatization " as the process by which everyday life is increasingly embedded in and penetrated by connectivity: the process of shifting interconnected individual, social, and cultural dependency on media, for mainte-nance, survival, and growth. I take the emergent sociotechnical flux as the principal shaper of 21 st -century...
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Adolfo Bioy Casares’ The Invention of Morel is a novella told through the diary of a fugitive who escapes his native Venezuela to what he believes is an uninhabited island. His hallucinatory account is key to the story, with time and tides out of synch and a strange reoccurrence and duplication of objects, people, animals and even two suns and two...
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Driven by a militarized imaginary and the fantasy of total control, the colonization of airspace and outer space is accelerating through the expansion of digital technologies and the algorithmic creep into weaponized spaces of surveillance and never-ending war.
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Andrew Hoskins – interviewed by Huw Halstead – discusses the tensions and paradoxes of memory and place in the connective era. Digital media liberate memory from the spatial archive, but they also create a connective compulsion and dependency, a disconnect from the present moment and a loss of control over memory. The overwhelming abundance and imm...
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Over the last century, humans have radically transformed airspace: chemically, territorially, militarily and psychologically. Technological developments mean that this transformation is accelerating and growing in complexity. There is widening disparity in the global landscape of power, with civilians increasingly subject to expanding commercial an...
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Digital technologies have disrupted most sectors of human life and activity, and war and conflict are no exceptions. Beyond military systems, the entire battlefield is transformed, with multi-media smartphones, messaging apps, and social media platforms especially creating a global, participative arena, in which the distinctions of combatant, civil...
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This article identifies in digital media ecologies two means through which war is being made increasingly inaccessible to human perception and intelligibility. The first is the digital volume and flux of images, information and disinformation, that afford the impression of a chaotic battlefield in which all sides are fighting with the new tools of...
Article
There is a persistent belief in the power of media images to transform the events they depict. Yet despite the instant availability of billions of images of human suffering and death in the continuous and connective digital glare of social media, the catastrophes of contemporary wars, such as in Syria and Yemen, unfold relentlessly. There are repea...
Article
The visual image has long been central to how war is seen, contested and legitimised, remembered and forgotten. Archives are pivotal to these ends as is their ownership and access, from state and other official repositories through to the countless photographs scattered and hidden from a collective understanding of what war looks like in individual...
Conference Paper
Online discussion platforms can face multiple challenges of abusive behaviour. In order to understand the reasons for persisting such behaviour, we need to understand how users behave inside and outside a community. In this paper, we propose a novel methodology to generate a dataset from offline and online group discussion conversations. We advocat...
Chapter
Donald Trump wasn’t just a sign of a broken reality; he was the beneficiary of it. Mainstream consensual reality had shattered a long time ago; it was just that shattering hadn’t gone mainstream. As the right understood, when reality becomes a free-for-all, then reality becomes available for the taking. It becomes a weaponizable force for anyone w...
Book
The election of Donald Trump as US President in 2016 seemed to catch the world napping. Like the vote for Brexit in the UK, there seemed to be a new de-synchronicity – a huge reality gap – between the unfolding of history and the mainstream news media’s interpretations of and reporting of contemporary events. Through a series of short, sharp interv...
Article
Our interdisciplinary project seeks to build new bridges between the study of the human and the social/cultural worlds of remembering; thus, memory 'in the head' and 'in the wild'. We are asking and answering three essential questions about: the existence of memory in the wild; the equivalence of memory in the head and in the wild; and traceability...
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Abstract: Memory, tired of its metaphors of media that gave it substance, strength, and vitality in the world, has embraced the new radical uncertainty of this era. Digital media have unmoored memory, messing with its traditional constraints (brains, groups, archives) to send it off in trajectories with unpredictable finitude and effects. As our at...
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Recent media ecologies are often characterized by their apparent excess and availability of information, in which elites have lost power to a multitude of citizen users. The 2010s, however, are marked by a new information battlespace, as governments, militaries and news organizations have arrested the initial chaotic free-for-all of the Internet. I...
Book
Digital media, networks and archives reimagine and revitalize individual, social and cultural memory but they also ensnare it, bringing it under new forms of control. Understanding these paradoxical conditions of remembering and forgetting through today’s technologies needs bold interdisciplinary interventions. Digital Memory Studies seizes this c...
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Official Military History (OH) is a thorny subject. Despite a century of deploying British service personnel to conflicts all over the world, over the past 100 years the British government has commissioned very few OHs. Offering an interpretation of military events that is typically based on early access to otherwise classified data, OH presents an...
Article
Whereas threats from twentieth century 'broadcast era' media were characterised in terms of ideology and ‘effects', today the greatest risks posed by media are informational. This paper argues that digital participation as the condition for the maintenance of today's self identity and basic sociality has shaped a new principal media risk of the los...
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This paper explores key Internet search trends for electoral information vis-à-vis the broader media ecology in the UK and the US. An innovative methodology is introduced that maps the informational trajectories of key election events by combining Google Trends data linked to significant news events during the campaigns. While the research found sp...
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The individual and collective and also cultural domains have long constituted challenging boundaries for the study of memory. These are often clearly demarcated between approaches drawn from the human and the social sciences and also humanities, respectively. But recent work turns the enduring imagination – the world view – of these domains on its...
Book
Risk and Hyperconnectivity brings together for the first time three paradigms of work: new risk theory, neoliberalization theory and connectivity theory, to illuminate how the kaleidoscope of risk events in the opening years of the new century have recharged a neoliberal battlespace of media, economy and security. Shadowed by broader political and...
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After Broadcast War and Diffused War comes Arrested War, the latest paradigm of war and media. Each paradigm coincides with a discrete phase of mediatization. This article explains how war and media operated during each phase, describing the key characteristics of war, the form and nature of the prevailing media ecology, and how power was exercised...
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内容摘要 在“连结性转向”之下,数字化技术、工具与媒介无处不在,触手可及,它们协力塑造着后稀 缺时代的文化。而当前的战争,也日益受到记忆政治即时性需求的影响。这里存在两条互不相容的记忆轨 迹。一方面,主流媒体围绕20 世纪战争发展起来的经典记忆图式在不断重复利用过程中面临衰竭;另一方 面,新近涌现的灾难和冲突则在转瞬间就开始纪念自己,将历史的距离、反思与后见之明统统剔除出去。 在新的纪念结构之下,媒介纪念和记忆文化让我们远离记忆现实和战争现实,而不是直面它们。 关 键 词 连结性转向 后稀缺文化 战争记忆 媒介纪念结构 图式化 作 者 安德鲁· 霍斯金斯,英国格拉斯哥大学社会科学学院教授。 译 者 李红涛,浙江大学社会思想研究所副教授。(杭州 310012)
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My aim here is not to consider European legislative attempts to introduce a ‘right to be forgotten’ in terms of their strictly legal aims to limit the use of personal information in current data processing systems and offer data subjects additional control over the fate of their personal data. Rather, my perspective is one developed from the view o...
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The start of the contemporary memory boom (Huyssen, 2003; Winter, 2006; Hoskins and O’Loughlin, 2010) is marked for many by the mass affordabiliiy and the availability of the video cassette recorder, the premiere screening of the Holocaust television miniseries on NBC in 1978 (Shandler, 1999) and the 1980 publication of the English translation of t...
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Just as personal memory functions through matching the here-and-now with an intelligible there-and-then, by shifting context, re-framing meaning and massive selectivity, journalism has long held – and imagined – a larger aperture of social memory. This relationship – between journalism and social memory – is ridden with the news values of rupture a...
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This article examines two cases in which political groups sought to harness the new media ecology to mobilise and justify acts of violence to public audiences and to supporters. In each case, a woman's suffering is presented and instrumentalised. However, the new media ecology offers an increasingly irregular economy of media modulation: digital fo...
Book
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This book examines the circulation and effects of radical discourse by analysing the role of mass media coverage in promoting or hindering radicalisation and acts of political violence. There is a new environment of conflict in the post-9/11 age, in which there appears to be emerging threats to security and stability in the shape of individuals an...
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Over the last hundred years, Anzac Day (25 April), the anniversary of the initial landing of Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) at Gallipoli in 1915, has captured the Australian and New Zealand national imaginations. The day remembers the first significant engagement involving Australian and New Zealand soldiers in the First World War. T...
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The 2005 London bombings is both marked by and is a marker of a post-scarcity memorial-media boom. There is a new contagion of the past driven by a memorial culture unstoppably equipped with the availability, portability and pervasiveness of digital devices, enabling the instant aggregation and archiving of everything. The ‘digital’, it can be said...
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The term radicalization proliferated in official and media discourses in the UK in 2005 and has become an anchoring concept in debates about jihadist-inspired political violence. This article presents original research from an investigation conducted in the UK and France in 2008–09 to elicit how audiences understand the term and concept of radicali...
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While terrorism informatics research has examined the technical composition of extremist media, there is less work examining the content and intent behind such media. We propose that the arguments and issues presented in extremist media provide insights into authors’ intent, which in turn may provide an evidence-base for detecting and assessing ris...
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Digitization creates an ontological challenge to broadcast-era metaphors (gate, channel, flow), not least to understandings of who news gatekeepers are, where gates lie, the presumed audience, community or culture gatekeeping is done for, and what it means to gatekeep. Analysing how jihadist speeches by bin Laden, Al-Zawahiri and others are transla...
Chapter
This essay highlights uneasy orientations to the ‘collective’ in contemporary discourses of memory and suggests its resonance is in part embedded in another out-of-synch conceptualization of the ‘collective’, namely that of the ‘mass media’. Instead, the paradigm shifts in the fields of media studies and memory studies require a bolder and more com...
Book
The trinity of government, military and publics has been drawn together into immediate and unpredictable relationships in a "new media ecology" that has ushered in new asymmetries in the waging of war and terror. To help us understand these new relationships, Andrew Hoskins and Ben O′Loughlin here provide a timely, comprehensive and highly readable...
Article
News reporting of terrorism, in the form of security journalism, faces a set of challenges to the functions it serves as a result of both its own practices and the changing practices of news consumers. Security journalism performs some predictable functions, namely the regular delivery of representations of terrorist threats to a presumed national...
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In an era marked by the apparent saturation of terror and the ubiquitous mediation of all‐things‐past, the value of and the prospects for the remembering of terrorist attacks appear caught up in the velocity of the immediate circulation of media data and in the cyclical iterations of news images. Rather than these processes affecting a reduction or...
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This article offers an account to terrorism and security studies of radicalisation as a discursive phenomenon delivered and constructed by news media. In our mediatised lives the ubiquitous recording of our activities and opinions means we may be inadvertently pre-mediating a later category of criminality which can be imposed retrospectively on wha...
Book
Television is a medium of terror. Stories and images of mostly distant violence and bloodshed are streamed continuously into our homes, penetrating our senses of personal and collective safety. And yet the journalism of terror is also the journalism of security. Television, as it delivers daily the spectre of endless terror and violence, also rescu...
Chapter
There is little doubt that the landscape of memory has transformed in modern times. How, what and why individuals and societies remember and forget is being shaped by technological, political, social and cultural shifts that interpenetrate memory and memories, their makers, deniers and their (identified mistakingly or otherwise as) ‘repositories’....
Chapter
The purpose of this chapter is to offer an alternative understanding of media—policy relations or the ‘CNN effect’ to that which has dominated existing political science approaches. In doing so, we show how our alternative ethnomethodological approach can shed more light on the original matter of concern. Hence, before we analyse media events, we m...
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Television relies upon history and the past in reporting the present. Thanks to growing archives of footage, television can mix together images and stories from the past to instantly frame the present and indeed the future. In fact, stories from the past are increasingly stories from television’s past. The history of the medium itself can be mapped...
Chapter
A key contention in recent writing on the subject of media and war is that an unprecedented ‘chaos’ has arrived now that technology enables the production and dissemination of images anywhere, instantly, by journalists and non-journalists alike (McNair, 2006; Tumber and Webster, 2006). Images such as those from Abu Ghraib, or of the Iraqi twelve-ye...
Chapter
In examining the television interaction order and the relationship between on-screen interactions and the off-screen perceptions of security of audiences and policymakers, the role of drama and documentary is particularly interesting. Woven into the schedules alongside news, these formats present renderings of many of the security salient events co...
Chapter
At stake in many public debates surrounding security before and particularly after 11 September 2001 has been the veracity of definitions of terror threats. Why are there always such differing viewpoints about the ‘reality’ of threats? Why, in August 2006, did British Home Secretary John Reid (2006) feel the need to bluntly say that critics of anti...
Chapter
Discussions of security issues have featured notable conceptual innovation since 11 September 2001. Concepts such as ‘War on Terror’ and ‘long war’ have been created, while concepts such as ‘WMD’ and ‘rogue states’ have moved from policy discourses into the public vernacular. For nation-states, a ‘new’ security dilemma has replaced an old one,1 and...
Chapter
Television news discourse is in crisis. The technological and textual transformations in twenty-first century television are inseparable from the post-9/11 environment of insecurity. Television’s economy of liveness and visually intensive interaction order is at the centre of new media and security ecologies that have marked the new century. The re...
Chapter
Time is at the centre of our understanding of the relationship between television news, television per se, and the culture within which television content is produced. In the weather commercial above, CNN appeals to viewers with reference to different temporalities. It offers ‘real-time’ weather reports, ‘historical perspective’, and ‘forecasts’ of...
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With newsmakers striving for ever greater visual immediacy and proximity to events, developments in the portability and the availability of audio-visual recording and broadcast devices continue to transform both how we experience mass-mediated terrorist attacks and their impact. At the same time, through shifting context, the reframing of meaning a...
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There is a certain evanescence to contemporary experience. A shortening of temporal horizons, diminishing attention spans, and a saturation of time and place, are all said to be characteristics of our mediated age. A key consequence of these ‘emerging new structures of temporality’ (Huyssen, 1995: 253) is a transformation in our relationship with t...
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In our globally mediated age our relationship with the past is increasingly interpreted through the lens of our presentist media. Conventional means of representing and remembering historical events have to some extent been superseded, with technological advances permitting increasingly electronically mediated viewpoints. Indeed, new generations, f...
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Television is the medium of time. Television news continually recontextualizes times as it remediates the past in the present. What has yet to be more fully implicated, however, is the modulation - the variance in pace – of the temporal features of the televisual environment. I consider some of the sites of the temporization of war by television ne...

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