Andrew J. Henley

Andrew J. Henley
University of Nottingham | Notts · School of Sociology and Social Policy

Doctor of Philosophy

About

18
Publications
3,690
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82
Citations
Introduction
My research is broadly focused on 'the impact of criminal records on life chances'. More specifically, how requirements to disclose and 'live with' a criminal record may impact on the subjectivities of former lawbreakers. I am also interested in comparative approaches to criminal records in European jurisdictions, the existence (or otherwise) of so-called 'collateral consequences' and attempts to mitigate these through legal and policy instruments.
Additional affiliations
September 2015 - June 2018
Keele University
Position
  • Lecturer
September 2012 - August 2015
Keele University
Position
  • Graduate Teaching Assistant
Education
September 2012 - September 2016
Keele University
Field of study
  • Criminology
October 2010 - December 2012
The Open University (UK)
Field of study
  • Social Sciences

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
This article discusses the relationships and tensions between the sentencing, statutory supervision and legal rehabilitation of lawbreakers under UK legislation. It does so with reference to both the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974, which allows some criminal records to become ‘spent’ after a set period of time, and the Offender Rehabilitation...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter seeks to critically examine current approaches to criminal records and their disclosure outside of criminal justice processes. In particular, it questions the rationalities underpinning disclosure practices where the rights of people with convictions (henceforth ‘PWCs’) to live a life free of stigma are often subordinated to the percei...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter I offer an alternative perspective to the themes of ‘dying’, ‘loss’ and bereavement’ within criminal justice and explore the relationships which exist between social practices of punishment and the status or positioning of former lawbreakers who have been punished . First, I provide a brief history of punishments in England whose ob...
Presentation
Full-text available
This presentation extends beyond the impacts and effects of criminal record on employment, to the wider consequences on people's access to the full rights of citizenship. It explores why the discrimination that people face is morally problematic, and sets out four principles that might comprise an alternative model of criminal records disclosure.
Article
This article critically examines the restrictions on access to statutory compensation in the UK for victims of serious crime with criminal records. Drawing on original analysis of Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority transparency data it reveals the scale of the denial of victimisation as a so-called 'collateral consequence of a criminal record...
Presentation
Full-text available
The collation and use of criminal records by the state has conventionally been regarded as essential for the prevention and detection of crime, the administration of justice and the maximisation of public safety. For instance: the police may check the criminal records of suspects to determine whether they are ‘known offenders’; those working in the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper explores the restrictions on access to state compensation for victims of crime with criminal records. It will, firstly, provide some background to the UK’s Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme, before explaining how the post-financial crisis period of fiscal austerity acted as the pretext for further restrictions on the Scheme’s coverag...
Preprint
Full-text available
This briefing note draws on the research conducted for a doctoral thesis (Henley 2017) which examined the conception, passage and contestation of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (the henceforth ‘ROA’). Sections of this thesis were based on original archival research and Hansard records which were used to understand the rationale behind the...
Chapter
Full-text available
Este capítulo busca examinar criticamente as atuais abordagens dos registros criminais e sua divulgação fora dos processos da justiça criminal. Em particular, ele questiona as razões que sustentam as práticas de divulgação, onde os direitos de pessoas com condenações de viverem uma vida livre de estigma são frequentemente subordinados à inferida ne...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter I offer an alternative perspective to the themes of ‘dying’, ‘loss’ and bereavement’ within criminal justice and explore the relationships which exist between social practices of punishment, and the status or positioning of former lawbreakers who have been punished. Firstly, I provide a brief history of punishments in England whose...
Chapter
Full-text available
The critical sociology of punishment has a long-established tradition of exploring issues such as: the differential application of penal sanctions across class, race and gender divisions; the harms associated with confinement in penal and semi-penal institutions; and the expansion of the carceral continuum into community settings. More recently, No...
Thesis
The collation and use of criminal records by the state has conventionally been regarded as essential for the prevention and detection of crime, the administration of justice and the maximisation of public safety. For instance: the police may check the criminal records of suspects to determine whether they are ‘known offenders’; those working in the...
Article
Full-text available
This article analyses the use of criminal justice measures aimed at the prevention of sexual offending across England and Wales. Specifically, it focuses on measures such as the ‘sex offenders register’ and sexual offences prevention orders (SOPOs) and the use of sanctions for their breach. Following a discussion of the apparent tensions between in...
Article
Full-text available
Social scientists, and geographers in particular, have long been interested in examining spatial patterns of offending in order to generate a “geography” of crime and criminality. This paper examines what value, if any, a geographical approach to the study of sexual offending might offer. Utilising published official data from England and Wales it...
Article
Full-text available
The Benthamite workhouse principle of ‘less eligibility’ dates back to the Poor Law Amendment Act 1834 and, since its application to the sphere of criminal justice, has long dictated that prisoners and other lawbreakers should always be last in the queue for access to scant welfare resources because of the moral censure attached to their behaviour....
Article
Full-text available
This article evaluates the contemporary discursive status of victims and people convicted of criminal offences. The rhetoric used by British politicians to convey the meaning of ‘rights’ is explored within media output, parliamentary speech-making and other forms of political discourse. Our analysis details how victims’ rights are sometimes advocat...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
My work in this project is broadly focused on the impact that a criminal record may have on the citizenship and life chances of people who have been in contact with the criminal justice system. This includes looking at systems of criminal records disclosure, de jure and de facto forms of discrimination based on criminal records (the so-called 'collateral consequences' of a criminal record), and the laws and policies which seek to mitigate discrimination resulting from a criminal record.