Andrew P Hendry

Andrew P Hendry
McGill University | McGill · Redpath Museum

PhD

About

330
Publications
104,277
Reads
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26,619
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2003 - December 2011
McGill University
January 2001 - December 2009
University of British Columbia - Vancouver
Position
  • University of British Columbia
January 2000 - December 2007
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Publications

Publications (330)
Article
Full-text available
Organismal traits are presumed to be well suited for performance in the tasks required for survival, growth, and reproduction. Major injuries to such traits should therefore compromise performance and prevent success in the natural world; yet some injured animals can survive for long periods of time and contribute to future generations. We here exa...
Article
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Movement patterns and habitat selection of animals have important implications for ecology and evolution. Darwin's finches are a classic model system for ecological and evolutionary studies, yet their spatial ecology remains poorly studied. We tagged and radio-tracked five (three females, two males) medium ground finches (Geospiza fortis) to examin...
Article
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Variation in traits related to foraging and locomotion in benthic and limnetic habitats has been observed in many fishes. Benthic and limnetic food chain productivity in lakes is strongly influenced by the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the water, suggesting that DOC might indirectly impose selection on these traits and lead to...
Article
A number of examples exist of trade-offs between mating success and survival; that is, success in one fitness component comes at the cost of success in the other fitness component. However, these expected trade-offs are – perhaps even more commonly – not observed. One explanation for this apparent paradox of missing trade-offs could be that the oth...
Article
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Wild populations must continuously adapt to environmental changes or they risk extinction. Such adaptations can be measured as phenotypic rates of change and can allow us to predict patterns of contemporary evolutionary change. About two decades ago, a dataset of phenotypic rates of change in wild populations was compiled. Since then, researchers h...
Preprint
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In nature, populations are subjected to a wide variety of environmental conditions that affect fitness and induce adaptive or plastic responses in traits, resulting in phenotypic divergence between populations. The dimensionality of that divergence, however, remains contentious. At the extremes, some contend that populations diverge along a single...
Article
Time is running out to limit further devastating losses of biodiversity and nature's contributions to humans. Addressing this crisis requires accurate predictions about which species and ecosystems are most at risk to ensure efficient use of limited conservation and management resources. We review existing biodiversity projection models and discove...
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How ecological divergence causes strong reproductive isolation between populations in close geographic contact remains poorly understood at the genomic level. We here study this question in a stickleback fish population pair adapted to contiguous, ecologically different lake and stream habitats. Clinal whole-genome sequence data reveal numerous gen...
Preprint
Full-text available
Wild populations must continuously adapt to environmental changes or they risk extinction. Such adaptations can be measured as phenotypic rates of change and can allow us to predict patterns of contemporary evolutionary change. About two decades ago, a dataset of phenotypic rates of change in wild populations was compiled. Since then, researchers h...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Spatial environmental gradients can promote adaptive differences among conspecific populations as a result of local adaptation or phenotypic plasticity. Such divergence can be opposed by various constraints, including gene flow, limited genetic variation, temporal fluctuations, or developmental constraints. We focus on the constraint that...
Article
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Parallel evolution is considered strong evidence for natural selection. However, few studies have investigated the process of parallel selection as it plays out in real time. The common approach is to study historical signatures of selection in populations already well adapted to different environments. Here, to document selection under natural con...
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Refuges that result from environmental heterogeneity within ecosystems have an important yet under-appreciated role in maintaining native community diversity in face of exotic invasion. The objective of our study was to determine if different refuge types constrain invasion impacts on native biodiversity at the whole ecosystem-scale of the Upper St...
Article
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Cities are uniquely complex systems regulated by interactions and feedbacks between natural and social processes. Characteristics of human society – including culture, economics, technology, and politics – underlie social patterns and activity, creating a heterogeneous environment that can influence and be influenced by both ecological and evolutio...
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The prey naiveté hypothesis (PNH) posits that prey will often fail to recognize and respond to introduced predators with whom they do not share a co-evolutionary history. We tested this hypothesis by examining anti-predator behaviour in the native characid fish Astyanax ruberrimus in response to its main native (Hoplias microlepis) and introduced (...
Article
Rare extreme “black swan” disturbances can impact ecosystems in many ways, such as destroying habitats, depleting resources, and causing high mortality. In rivers, for instance, exceptional floods that occur infrequently (e.g., so‐called “50‐year floods”) can strongly impact the abundance of fishes and other aquatic organisms. Beyond such ecologica...
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Recent methodological advances have led to a rapid expansion of evolutionary stud-ies employing three-dimensional landmark-based geometric morphometrics (GM). GM methods generally enable researchers to capture and compare complex shape phenotypes, and to quantify their relationship to environmental gradients. However, some recent studies have shown...
Preprint
Full-text available
Parallel evolution is considered strong evidence for natural selection. However, few studies have investigated the process of parallel selection as it plays out in real time. The common approach is to study historical signatures of selection in populations already well adapted to different environments. Here, to document selection in action under n...
Preprint
Full-text available
13 Captive-bred ball pythons (Python regius) represent a powerful model system for studying the 14 genetic basis of colour variation and Mendelian phenotypes in vertebrates. Although hundreds 15 of Mendelian phenotypes (colour morphs) affecting colouration and patterning have been 16 described for ball pythons, the genes causing these colour morphs...
Article
The 2019 United Nations Global assessment report on biodiversity and ecosystem services estimated that approximately 1 million species are at risk of extinction. This primarily human-driven loss of biodiversity has unprecedented negative consequences for ecosystems and people. Classic and emerging approaches in genetics and genomics have the potent...
Article
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Urbanization is changing Earth's ecosystems by altering the interactions and feedbacks between the fundamental ecological and evolutionary processes that maintain life. Humans in cities alter the eco-evolutionary play by simultaneously changing both the actors and the stage on which the eco-evolutionary play takes place. Urbanization modifies land...
Preprint
Full-text available
Recent methodological advances have led to a rapid expansion of evolutionary studies employing three‐dimensional landmark‐based geometric morphometrics (GM). GM methods generally enable researchers to capture and compare complex shape phenotypes, and to quantify their relationship to environmental gradients. However, some recent studies have shown...
Preprint
Full-text available
How ecological divergence causes strong reproductive isolation between populations in close geographic contact remains poorly understood at the genomic level. We here study this question in a stickleback population pair adapted to contiguous, ecologically different lake and stream habitats. Dense clinal whole-genome sequence data reveal numerous re...
Chapter
The term “contemporary evolution” is typically used in reference to ongoing or recent genetically based (heritable) phenotypic changes taking place in wild populations. In some cases, the genetic and genomic basis for these phenotypic changes can be identified and documented. Contemporary evolution is most apparent when organisms experience dramati...
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Declines in animal body sizes are widely reported and likely impact ecological interactions and ecosystem services. For harvested species subject to multiple stressors, limited understanding of the causes and consequences of size declines impedes prediction, prevention, and mitigation. We highlight widespread declines in Pacific salmon size based o...
Article
Ecosystem size is known to influence both community structure and ecosystem processes. Less is known about the evolutionary consequences of ecosystem size. A few studies have shown that ecosystem size shapes the evolution of trophic diversity by shaping habitat heterogeneity, but the effects of ecosystem size on antipredator trait evolution have no...
Article
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Historically, many biologists assumed that evolution and ecology acted independently because evolution occurred over distances too great to influence most ecological patterns. Today, evidence indicates that evolution can operate over a range of spatial scales, including fine spatial scales. Thus, evolutionary divergence across space might frequentl...
Article
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Populations that are asymmetrically isolated, such as above waterfalls, can sometimes export emigrants in a direction from which they do not receive immigrants, and thus provide an excellent opportunity to study the evolution of dispersal traits. We investigated the rheotaxis of guppies above barrier waterfalls in the Aripo and Turure rivers in Tri...
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Adaptive radiation plays a fundamental role in our understanding of the evolutionary process. However, the concept has provoked strong and differing opinions concerning its definition and nature among researchers studying a wide diversity of systems. Here, we take a broad view of what constitutes an adaptive radiation, and seek to find commonalitie...
Article
Disruptive natural selection within populations exploiting different resources is considered to be a major driver of adaptive radiation and the production of biodiversity. Fitness functions, which describe the relationships between trait variation and fitness, can help to illuminate how this disruptive selection leads to population differentiation....
Article
Horizon scanning is a systematic approach increasingly used in conservation to explore emerging trends, issues, opportunities, and threats. We present the results from one such exercise aimed at identifying emerging issues that could have important scientific, social, technological, and managerial implications for the conservation of inland waters...
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Studies of parallel evolution are seldom able to disentangle the influence of cryptic environmental variation from that of evolutionary history; whereas the unique life history of pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) presents an opportunity to do so. All pink salmon mature at age two and die after breeding. Hence, pink salmon bred in even years are...
Article
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The repeatability of adaptive radiation is expected to be scale-dependent, with determinism decreasing as greater spatial separation among "replicates" leads to their increased genetic and ecological independence. Threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) provide an opportunity to test whether this expectation holds for the early stages of ad...
Article
Predator‐prey interactions play a key role in the evolution of species traits through antagonistic coevolutionary arms‐races. The evolution of beak morphology in the Darwin's finches in response to competition for seed resources is a classic example of evolution by natural selection. The seeds of Tribulus cistoides are an important food source for...
Article
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Genetic variation is fundamental to population fitness and adaptation to environmental change. Human activities are driving declines in many wild populations and could have similar effects on genetic variation. Despite the importance of estimating such declines, no global estimate of the magnitude of ongoing genetic variation loss has been conducte...
Article
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Human activities are dramatically altering ecosystems worldwide, often resulting in shifts in selection regimes. In response, natural populations sometimes undergo rapid phenotypic changes, which if adaptive, can increase their probability of persistence. However, in many instances, populations fail to undergo any phenotypic change, which might ind...
Article
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Evolutionary biologist tend to approach the study of the natural world within a framework of adaptation, inspired perhaps by the power of natural selection to produce fitness advantages that drive population persistence and biological diversity. In contrast, evolution has rarely been studied through the lens of adaptation’s complement, maladaptatio...
Article
Fishes are sensitive to their thermal environment and face an uncertain future in a warming world. Theoretically, populations in novel environments might express greater levels of phenotypic variability to increase the chance of surviving—and eventually thriving—in the new conditions. Most research on the effect of the early thermal environment in...
Article
Evolutionary biologists have long trained their sights on adaptation, focusing on the power of natural selection to produce relative fitness advantages while often ignoring changes in absolute fitness. Ecologists generally have taken a different tack, focusing on changes in abundance and ranges that reflect absolute fitness while often ignoring rel...
Article
Progress toward local adaptation is expected to be enhanced when divergent selection is multidimensional, because many simultaneous sources of selection can increase the total strength of selection and enhance the number of independent traits under selection. Yet, whether local adaptation ensues from multidimensional selection also depends on its p...
Article
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In dendritic river systems, gene flow is expected to occur primarily within watersheds. Yet, rare cross‐watershed transfers can also occur, whether mediated by (often historical) geological events or (often contemporary) human activities. We explored these events and their potential evolutionary consequences by analyzing patterns of neutral genetic...
Preprint
Full-text available
The repeatability of adaptive radiation is expected to be scale dependent, with determinism decreasing as greater spatial separation among ″replicates″ leads to their increased genetic and ecological independence. Threespine stickleback ( Gasterosteus aculeatus ) provide an opportunity to test whether this expectation holds for the early stages of...
Article
Full-text available
There is growing concern over tipping points arising in ecosystems because of the crossing of environmental thresholds. Tipping points lead to abrupt and possibly irreversible shifts between alternative ecosystem states, potentially incurring high societal costs. Trait variation in populations is central to the biotic feedbacks that maintain altern...
Article
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The Trinidadian guppy is emblematic of parallel and convergent evolution, with repeated demonstrations that predation regime is a driver of adaptive trait evolution. A classic and foundational experiment in this system was conducted by John Endler 40 years ago, where male guppies placed into low‐predation environments in the laboratory evolved incr...
Preprint
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Genetic variation underpins population fitness and adaptive potential. Thus it plays a key role in any species' probability of long-term persistence, particularly under global climate change. Genetic variation can be lost in a single generation but its replenishment may take hundreds of generations. For that reason safeguarding genetic variation is...
Article
Studies of parallel or convergent evolution (the repeated, independent evolution of similar traits in similar habitats) rarely explicitly quantify the extent of parallelism (i.e., variation in the direction and/or magnitude of divergence) between the sexes; instead they often investigate both sexes together or exclude one sex. However, differences...
Article
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Background: Trade-offs between natural and sexual selection have major consequences for the evolution of traits subject to both forces. However, such a trade-off might not be easily detected given that both natural and sexual selection operate in a multi-trait-rather than in a single-trait-manner. Organism: The Trinidadian guppy, Poecilia reticulat...
Article
1.A growing body of empirical work supports and informs the role of genetic variation and contemporary evolution in shaping ecological dynamics at the population, community, and ecosystem levels. Although much progress has been made, I contend that reliance on several common empirical and inferential approaches is limiting forward progress in key a...
Article
1.Theoretical models pertaining to feedbacks between ecological and evolutionary processes are prevalent in multiple biological fields. An integrative overview is currently lacking, due to little crosstalk between the fields and the use of different methodological approaches. 2.Here, we review a wide range of models of eco‐evolutionary feedbacks an...
Article
Full-text available
Urban ecosystems are rapidly expanding throughout the world, but how urban growth affects the evolutionary ecology of species living in urban areas remains largely unknown. Urban ecology has advanced our understanding of how the development of cities and towns changes environmental conditions and alters ecological processes and patterns. However, d...
Article
The rate of evolution of population mean fitness informs how selection acting in contemporary populations can counteract environmental change and genetic degradation (mutation, gene flow, drift, recombination). This rate influences population increases (e.g., range expansion), population stability (e.g., cryptic eco-evolutionary dynamics), and popu...
Preprint
Full-text available
There is growing concern over tipping points arising in ecosystems due to the crossing of environmental thresholds. Tipping points lead to strong and possibly irreversible shifts between alternative ecosystem states incurring high societal costs. Traits are central to the feedbacks that maintain alternative ecosystem states, as they govern the resp...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanization is influencing patterns of biological evolution in ways that are only beginning to be explored. One potential effect of urbanization is in modifying ecological resource distributions that underlie niche differences and that thus promote and maintain species diversification. Few studies have assessed such modifications, or their potenti...
Article
Human activities are driving rapid phenotypic change in many species, with harvesting considered to be a particularly potent evolutionary force. We hypothesized that faster evolutionary change in human-disturbed populations could be caused by a strengthening of phenotypic selection, for example, if human disturbances trigger maladaptation and/or in...
Article
The keystone species concept is used in ecology to describe individual species with disproportionately large effects on their communities. We extend this idea to the level of genes with disproportionately large effects on ecological processes. Such ‘keystone genes’ (KGs) would underlie traits involved in species interactions or causing critical bio...
Preprint
Full-text available
1. Theoretical models pertaining to feedbacks between ecological and evolutionary processes are prevalent in multiple biological fields. An integrative overview is currently lacking, due to little crosstalk between the fields and the use of different methodological approaches. 2. Here we review a wide range of models of eco-evolutionary feedbacks a...
Article
Full-text available
The role of parasites in shaping melanin-based colour polymorphism, and the consequences of colour polymorphism for disease resistance, remain debated. Here we review recent evidence of the links between melanin-based coloration and the behavioural and immunological defences of vertebrates against their parasites. First we propose that (1) differen...