Andrew Hacket-Pain

Andrew Hacket-Pain
University of Liverpool | UoL · Department of Geography and Planning

MA, PhD

About

55
Publications
26,454
Reads
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Introduction
I am an ecologist focused on understanding and predicting the impact of global environmental change on forests. I work on forest and tree growth, using tree rings to monitor forest responses to climate change, and to predict the resilience of forests to drought and other stresses. I also work on tree reproduction and forest regeneration, particularly the ecology of seed masting. I am interested in understanding how plants regulate variability in reproductive effort, and how they synchronise this variability over space and time. My current work is focused on understanding how masting will response to environmental change and predicting what this will mean for the dynamics of forest ecosystems.
Additional affiliations
October 2009 - September 2013
University of Cambridge
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (55)
Article
Full-text available
Significant gaps remain in understanding the response of plant reproduction to environmental change. This is partly because measuring reproduction in long-lived plants requires direct observation over many years and such datasets have rarely been made publicly available. Here we introduce MASTREE+, a dataset that collates reproductive time-series d...
Article
Full-text available
The growth of past, present, and future forests was, is and will be affected by climate variability. This multifaceted relationship has been assessed in several regional studies, but spatially resolved, large-scale analyses are largely missing so far. Here we estimate recent changes in growth of 5800 beech trees ( Fagus sylvatica L.) from 324 sites...
Article
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The mechanistic pathways connecting ocean-atmosphere variability and terrestrial productivity are well-established theoretically, but remain challenging to quantify empirically. Such quantification will greatly improve the assessment and prediction of changes in terrestrial carbon sequestration in response to dynamically induced climatic extremes....
Article
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Lack of tree fecundity data across climatic gradients precludes the analysis of how seed supply contributes to global variation in forest regeneration and biotic interactions responsible for biodiversity. A global synthesis of raw seedproduction data shows a 250‐fold increase in seed abundance from cold‐dry to warm‐wet climates, driven primarily by...
Article
Full-text available
The relationships that control seed production in trees are fundamental to understanding the evolution of forest species and their capacity to recover from increasing losses to drought, fire, and harvest. A synthesis of fecundity data from 714 species worldwide allowed us to examine hypotheses that are central to quantifying reproduction, a foundat...
Article
Full-text available
Drought will increasingly threaten forest ecosystems worldwide. Understanding how competition influences tree growth response to drought is essential for forest management aiming at climate change adaptation. However, published results from individual case studies are heterogeneous and sometimes contradictory. We reviewed 166 cases from the peer-re...
Article
Masting characterizes large, intermittent and highly synchronous seeding events among individual plants and is found throughout the plant Tree of Life (ToL). Although masting can increase plant fitness, little is known about whether it results in evolutionary changes across entire clades, such as by promoting speciation or enhanced trait selection....
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is reshaping global vegetation through its impacts on plant mortality, but recruitment creates the next generation of plants and will determine the structure and composition of future communities. Recruitment depends on mean seed production, but also on the interannual variability and among-plant synchrony in seed production, the phe...
Article
Full-text available
Populations of many long-lived plants exhibit spatially synchronized seed production that varies extensively over time, so that seed production in some years is much higher than on average, while in others, it is much lower or absent. This phenomenon termed masting or mast seeding has important consequences for plant reproductive success, ecosystem...
Poster
Full-text available
Many plant populations produce remarkably different quantities of seed each year, varying on a continuum from virtually zero seeds to bumper seed crops. This behaviour is thought to reduce the individual costs of reproduction - e.g., fewer seeds are lost to predators and/or pollination becomes more efficient. Not all seed crops are expected to fluc...
Article
Andrew Hacket-Pain introduces the phenomenon known as 'masting', in which perennial plants show extraordinary variation in annual reproductive effort.
Article
Full-text available
Phenology and fruit production are sensitive to climate. Variation of leaf phenology alters canopy duration (an indicator of growing season length), which in turn affects forest ecosystem functioning and tree productivity. However, the influence of canopy duration on tree reproduction is poorly explored. In this study, we investigated if and to wha...
Article
Full-text available
There is evidence that variable and synchronous reproduction in seed plants (masting) correlates to modes of climate variability, e.g. El Niño Southern Oscillation and North Atlantic Oscillation. In this perspective, we explore the breadth of knowledge on how climate modes control reproduction in major masting species throughout Earth's biomes. We...
Article
Full-text available
Spatial synchrony is the tendency of spatially separated populations to display similar temporal fluctuations. Synchrony affects regional ecosystem functioning, but it remains difficult to disentangle its underlying mechanisms. We leveraged regression on distance matrices and geography of synchrony to understand the processes driving synchrony of E...
Article
Full-text available
Global change is expanding the ecological niche of mixed-severity fire regimes into ecosystems that have not usually been associated with wildfires, such as temperate- and rainforests. In contrast to standreplacing fires, mixed-severity fires may result in delayed tree mortality driven by secondary factors such as post-fire environmental conditions...
Preprint
Full-text available
Climate change is reshaping global vegetation through its impacts on plant mortality, but recruitment creates the next generation of plants and will determine the structure and composition of future communities. Recruitment depends on mean seed production, but also on the interannual variability and among-plant synchrony in seed production, the phe...
Article
Full-text available
Araucaria araucana is a dioecious evergreen conifer endemic from temperate forests of south Argentina and Chile. It is a long-lived species (maximum age > 1000 years), and it presents a high potential for tree-ring based climate reconstructions. However, the species’ dioecious habit can result in distinct sex-specific growth patterns, which introdu...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is altering patterns of seed production worldwide with consequences for population recruitment and migration potential. For the many species that regenerate through synchronized, quasiperiodic reproductive events termed masting, these changes include decreases in the synchrony and interannual variation in seed production. This break‐...
Article
Full-text available
Annually variable and synchronous seed production, or masting, is often correlated with environmental factors and in oaks involves differential pollination success that depends on phenological synchrony in flowering. The synchronization of phenology of flowering was thought to be driven by temperature during flowering (micro-climatic hypothesis). W...
Article
Climate change is altering patterns of seed production worldwide [1–4], but the potential for evolutionary responses to these changes is poorly understood. Masting (synchronous, annually variable seed production by plant populations) is selectively beneficial through economies of scale that decrease the cost of reproduction per surviving offspring...
Article
Full-text available
In his recent communication on our original paper 1,2 , D. Kelly, claiming that nutrient scarcity cannot select for masting behaviour in plants, initiated a fruitful discussion on traditionally settled hypotheses about the evolution of reproductive behaviour in plants. In his commentary, Kelly raises support for a contrasting hypothesis explaining...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Climate limits the potential distribution ranges of species. Establishment and growth of individuals at range margins is assumed to be more limited by extreme events such as drought or frost events than in the centre of their range. We explore whether the growth of beech is more sensitive to drought towards the dry distribution margin and more...
Article
Full-text available
Highly variable and synchronised production of seeds by plant populations, known as masting, is implicated in many important ecological processes, but how it arises remains poorly understood. The lack of experimental studies prevents underlying mechanisms from being explicitly tested, and thereby precludes meaningful predictions on the consequences...
Article
Full-text available
Many plants benefit from synchronous year-to-year variation in seed production, called masting. Masting benefits plants because it increases the efficiency of pollination and satiates predators, which reduces seed loss. Here, using a 39-year-long dataset, we show that climate warming over recent decades has increased seed production of European bee...
Article
Full-text available
Mast seeding is one of the most intriguing reproductive traits in nature. Despite its potential drawbacks in terms of fitness, the widespread existence of this phenomenon suggests that it should have evolutionary advantages under certain circumstances. Using a global dataset of seed production time series for 219 plant species from all of the conti...
Article
Full-text available
1.Synchronous pulses of seed masting and natural disturbance have positive feedbacks on the reproduction of masting species in disturbance‐prone ecosystems. We test the hypotheses that disturbances and proximate causes of masting are correlated, and that their large‐scale synchrony is driven by similar climate teleconnection patterns at both inter‐...
Article
Full-text available
Ring-width series are important for diverse fields of research such as the study of past climate, forest ecology, forest genetics, and the determination of origin (dendro-provenancing) or dating of archeological objects. Recent research suggests diverging climate-growth relationships in tree-rings due to the cardinal direction of extracting the tre...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is expected to alter disturbance regimes including fires in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forests. Regarding the resilience of beech forests to fire it is questionable whether seeds of this non-serotinous obligate masting seeder find advantageous conditions in a post-fire environment. The probability of recruitment success has...
Article
Full-text available
Tree growth and reproduction are subject to trade-offs in resource allocation. At the same time, they are both influenced by climate. In this study, we combined long records of reproductive effort at the individual- (29 years), population- (41 years) and regional (up to 53 years) scale, and tree ring chronologies, to investigate the effects of clim...
Article
Full-text available
Climatically controlled allocation to reproduction is a key mechanism by which climate influences tree growth and may explain lagged correlations between climate and growth. We used continent-wide datasets of tree-ring chronologies and annual reproductive effort in Fagus sylvatica from 1901-2015 to characterise relationships between climate, reprod...
Chapter
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Building on the eco-hydrological insights reviewed in Chapter 2 and the ongoing change in determinants of the forest-water relationship in Chapter 3, this chapter aims to clarify the effects that changing climate and quantity, quality and pattern of tree cover in forests have on the way water becomes available for human use and ecosystem integrity....
Chapter
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In this chapter, we review current scientific understanding and hypotheses at seven system delineations that build up from the level of a ‘tree’ interacting with water, to that of a social-ecological system at the scale of landscapes. A system delineation separates internal entities that in-teract dynamically from external entities that may have a...
Article
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In 2008, a group of conservation scientists compiled a list of 100 priority questions for the conservation of the world's biodiversity [Sutherland et al. (2009) Conservation Biology, 23, 557–567]. However, now almost a decade later, no one has yet published a study gauging how much progress has been made in addressing these 100 high‐priority questi...
Article
Masting is the highly variable and synchronous production of seeds by plants. Masting can have cascading effects on plant population dynamics and forest properties such as tree growth, carbon stocks, regeneration, nutrient cycling, or future species composition. However, masting has often been missing from forest models. Those few that simulate mas...
Article
Full-text available
Disentangling the high- and low-frequency effect of climate oscillations on synchronous seed production would improve our understanding of masting as an ecological process. We show for century-long data that inter-annual and decadal changes of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) drove continent-wide masting of Fagus sylvatica L. (European beech)....
Article
Full-text available
Mast seeding is a crucial population process in many tree species, but its spatio-temporal patterns and drivers at the continental scale remain unknown . Using a large dataset (8000 masting observations across Europe for years 1950–2014) we analysed the spatial pattern of masting across the entire geographical range of European beech, how it is inf...
Article
Mast seeding is a crucial population process in many tree species, but its spatio-temporal patterns and drivers at the continental scale remain unknown. Using a large dataset (8000 masting observations across Europe for years 1950–2014) we analysed the spatial pattern of masting across the entire geographical range of European beech, how it is infl...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing CO2 concentrations are strongly controlled by the behavior of established forests, which are believed to be a major current sink of atmospheric CO2. There are many models which predict forest responses to environmental changes but they are almost exclusively carbon source (i.e., photosynthesis) driven. Here we present a model for an indi...
Article
Full-text available
Interannual variation in radial growth is influenced by a range of physiological processes, including variation in annual reproductive effort, although the importance of reproductive allocation has rarely been quantified. In this study, we use long stand-level records of annual seed production, radial growth (tree ring width) and meteorological con...
Article
Full-text available
Tree populations at the equatorward edge of their distribution are predicted to respond to increased temperature and drought with declining performance. Empirical studies of Fagus sylvatica L., one of the most studied tree species in Europe, have broadly supported these predictions. Using a network of tree ring chronologies from northern Greece, we...
Article
Full-text available
Tree masting is one of the most intensively studied ecological processes. It affects nutrient fluxes of trees, regeneration dynamics in forests, animal population densities, and ultimately influences ecosystem services. Despite a large volume of research focused on masting, its evolutionary ecology, spatial and temporal variability and environmenta...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of our study was to determine variation in the response of radial growth in Fagus sylvatica L (European Beech) to climate across the species full geographical distribution and climatic tolerance. We combined new and existing data to build a database of 140 tree-ring chronologies to investigate patterns in growth–climate relationships. Our n...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing CO 2 concentrations are strongly controlled by the behaviour of undisturbed forests, which are believed to be a major current sink of atmospheric CO 2 . There are many models which predict forest responses to environmental changes but they are almost exclusively carbon source (i.e. photosynthesis) driven. Here we present a model for an i...
Presentation
Full-text available
Summary Mast events occur synchronously across large populations and can result in significant reductions in tree growth. As these mast events are cued by particular weather conditions (previous summer climate) and may change in frequency and/or intensity with tree age, they can create complex signals in tree ring chronologies. The aim of this stud...
Poster
Full-text available
Summary and Aims We have used a novel meta-analysis approach to build a database of tree ring data for European beech from approximately 300 sites across Europe, using results and data published in the literature and our own data. We used this data to investigate patterns of sensitivity to climate across wide geographical and climatic gradients. In...
Article
Full-text available
Tree growth is frequently linked to weather conditions prior to the growing season but our understanding of these lagged climate signatures is still poorly developed. We investigated the influence of masting behaviour on the relationship between growth and climate in European Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) using a rare long-term dataset of seed product...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
In the context of climate change, the future of forest tree species is still rather uncertain. In order to better predict what will happen in the next decades, it is necessary to better understand how trees reacted to the past climate change of these last decades. For that purpose, denchrochronology is a pertinent scientific method. From the measurement and dating of tree-rings, useful information can be extracted for analyzing relationships between the growth and vitally of trees and their changing environment.
Project
We aim to achieve further insights on plasticity and heritability in Fagus sylvatica (L.) by a combination of field data, common garden and climate chamber experiments as well as dendroecology. This project is part of the DFG Research Training Group 2010 “RESPONSE” on biological responses to novel and changing environment (https://biologie.uni-greifswald.de/forschung/dfg-graduiertenkollegs/research-training-group-2010/).
Project
The development and analysis of regional and continental tree ring networks for Fagus sylvatica.