Andrew Giguere

Andrew Giguere
University of Vienna | UniWien · Department of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science, Division of Microbial Ecology

PhD

About

11
Publications
1,653
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
442
Citations
Introduction
Andrew Giguere currently works at the University of Vienna. Andrew does research in Ecology, Microbiology and Soil Science.

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
Significant rates of atmospheric dihydrogen (H 2) consumption have been observed in temperate soils due to the activity of high-affinity enzymes, such as the group 1h [NiFe]-hydrogenase. We designed broadly inclusive primers targeting the large subunit gene (hhyL) of group 1h [NiFe]-hydrogenases for long-read sequencing to explore its taxonomic dis...
Article
Full-text available
Nitrification is a ubiquitous microbially mediated process in the environment and an essential process in engineered systems such as wastewater and drinking water treatment plants. However, nitrification also contributes to fertilizer loss from agricultural environments, increasing the eutrophication of downstream aquatic ecosystems, and produces t...
Article
Full-text available
Nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, emits nitrogen (N) oxide gases (NO, NO 2 , and N 2 O), which are potentially hazardous compounds that contribute to global warming. To better understand the dynamics of nitrification-derived N oxide production, we conducted culturing experiments and used an integrative genome-s...
Article
The factors influencing how soil nitrite (NO2−)- and ammonia (NH3)-oxidizing activities remain coupled are unknown. A short-term study ( < 48 h) was conducted to examine the dynamics of NO2−-oxidizing activity and the accumulation of NO2− in three Oregon soils stimulated by the addition of 1 mM NH4+ in soil slurry. Nitrite initially accumulated in...
Article
Full-text available
AimThere is interest in determining how cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) modifies N cycling in sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.) soils of the western USA. Methods To gain insight into the roles of fungi and bacteria in N cycling of cheatgrass-invaded and uninvaded sagebrush soils, the fungal protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide (CHX), and...
Article
The factors controlling the relative contributions of ammonia- (NH3) oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) to nitrification and nitrous oxide (N2O) production in soil remain unclear. A study was conducted to examine the contributions of AOA and AOB to nitrification, nitrite (NO2⁻) accumulation, and NO2⁻-affected N2O production in three non-cro...
Article
Soil nitrification potential (NP) activities of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria (AOA and AOB, respectively) were evaluated across a temperature gradient (4–42 °C) imposed upon eight soils from four different sites in Oregon and modeled with both the macromolecular rate theory and the square root growth models to quantify the thermodynamic re...
Article
Full-text available
Importance: Bacterial cell-cell signaling, or quorum sensing (QS), is a method of bacterial communication and gene regulation that is well studied in bacteria. However, little is known about the purpose of QS in many environmentally important bacteria. Here, we demonstrate quorum quenching coupled with mRNA-Seq to identify QS-controlled genes and...
Article
Importance: Nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, is an important process in the global nitrogen cycle. This process is generally dependent on ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. Most nitrifiers are chemolithoautotrophs that fix inorganic carbon (CO2) for growth. Here, we investigate h...
Article
Although ammonia-oxidizing archaea (aoa) and bacteria (aoB) coexist in most non-acidic agricultural soils, the factors that influence their relative contributions to soil nitrification activity remain unclear. a 2-to 4-d whole soil microcosm assay was developed, utilizing the aliphatic c8 alkyne 1-octyne to inactivate aoB-driven nitrification activ...
Article
Full-text available
Ammonia (NH3)-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and thaumarchaea (AOA) co-occupy most soils, yet no short-term growth-independent method exists to determine their relative contributions to nitrification in situ. Microbial monooxygenases differ in their vulnerability to inactivation by aliphatic n-alkynes, and we found that NH3 oxidation by the marine thauma...

Network

Cited By