Andrew Mark Dorman

Andrew Mark Dorman
King's College London | KCL · Department of Defence Studies

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54
Publications
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302
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Introduction
Andrew Mark Dorman is a Professor of International Security at King's College London based at the Joint Services Command and Staff College. He is also the Commissioning Editor of the Chatham House journal International Affairs published by Oxford University Press.

Publications

Publications (54)
Chapter
This chapter examines the United Kingdom using the prescribed six-section format. It argues that the UK finds itself in a difficult and in somewhat of an unusual position. It faces the problems of increasing challenges to its current position, major divisions at home and the impact of the coronavirus on its’ economy. In the background remains the i...
Article
During 2015 Prime Minister Cameron found himself under intense domestic and international pressure over his apparent reluctance to maintain United Kingdom defence spending at the NATO target level of 2 per cent of GDP. Most commentators attributed this reluctance to the inevitability of defence cuts if the government wished to meet its deficit redu...
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Whichever party or parties form the next UK government, a Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR) is expected to begin soon after the general election in May. The review might be a ‘light touch’ exercise—little more than a reaffirmation of the SDSR produced by the coalition government in 2010. It seems more likely, however, that the review wil...
Chapter
Over the last two decades or so the literature on innovation has emerged, building initially on the idea of Revolutions in Military Affairs and then moving to a much broader agenda on the idea of defense transformation.1 While there are divisions over who can lead transformation there is a general acceptance that defense transformation, particularl...
Article
In September 2014 the people of Scotland will vote on whether to become an independent nation, with the defence and security of Scotland proving to be one of the more vociferous areas of debate. This article argues that defence and security implications of this referendum are far more fundamental than either the ‘yes’ or ‘no’ campaigns have admitte...
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The next Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR) will be held in 2015. With unfinished business from its 2010 predecessor, and with no sign that UK national strategy is about to escape the grip of austerity, the 2015 SDSR is set to be more complex and contentious than the government might have hoped. There is a possibility that the review will...
Article
NATO and its members are beginning to gear themselves up for the summit in Chicago in May 2012. Such summits are always important, especially when they are held in the United States during an election year and in the aftermath of the French presidential elections. This article addresses the issues that are likely to be most prominent at the Chicago...
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One of the first steps taken by the newly elected Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government was to initiate a review of the national strategy of the United Kingdom. The review culminated in October 2010 in the publication of a revised National Security Strategy as well as a new Strategic Defence and Security Review.With the benefit of over...
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The history of British defence reviews has been one of repeated disappointment: a cycle in which policy failure is followed by a period of inertia, giving way to an attempt at a new policy framework which is then misimplemented by the defence leadership. Each failed defence review therefore sows the seeds of its successor. With this in mind, in 201...
Article
This article will examine the recent Strategic Defense and Security Review (SDSR). The build-up to the SDSR lasted a number of years. It was not until Bob Ainsworth was appointed as Gordon Brown's third Defense Secretary in less than two years - Blair, in contrast, had four Defense Secretaries over the course of a decade in office - that the previo...
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The United Kingdom's Coalition Government published its Strategic Defense and Security Review (SDSR). The Manifestoes of the three major Parties were no better. The first defense-related statement to emerge from Downing Street after the new Conservative/Liberal Democrat Coalition government was formed was equally bereft of ideas. The next two artic...
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With a strategic defence review expected to begin in 2010, this article reflects upon the history of the review in British defence policy and planning. The authors argue that for decades successive defence reviews have followed a process in which policy development moves through four phases: failure, inertia, formulation and misimplementation. This...
Article
Andrew Dorman introduces Sierra Leone as Blair's second great military adventure after Kosovo and the first he undertook on his own. The book links Blair's move toward humanitarianism with the rise of cosmopolitan militaries and the increasing involvement of Western forces in humanitarian operations and their impact on the international system, and...
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Preparations for the next UK defence review are under way; a struggle is imminent and the lines of battle are being drawn. There is a grave danger that in the new ‘age of austerity’ defence planning—and strategy generally—will be driven by tribal conflicts, either between supporters of one or other of the armed services or between contending viewpo...
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The Labour government's 1998 Strategic Defence Review (SDR) marked the end of almost twenty years during which Labour had been little more than a bystander in British defence policy-making. The ‘foreign policy-led’ SDR marked an impressive and authoritative debut, emulated by other national governments. Ten years later, however, the SDR is a fading...
Article
As defence becomes a political football once again this article examines the relationship of the UK's military with the country from which it is drawn and which it serves. It argues that all three elements of the classic Clausewitzian trinity: the state, the people and the military, there are major problems. These are undermining the capabilities o...
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The deployment of British to Sierra Leone served as an example of low-intensity operation. A significant number of its peacekeepers had been captured by the rebel Revolutionary Unite Front (RUF). The 11 members of the Royal Irish Regiment were taken hostage but they were successfully rescued by British army. Within this overall success, there were...
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Case Study 1 -- The Malayan Emergency (1948-1960); Case Study 2 -- Northern Ireland (August 1969-March 1972); Case Study 3 -- Northern Ireland (1972-1976): The Army Takes Control; Case Study 4 -- Northern Ireland (1976-1994): Police Primacy; Case Study 5 -- Bosnia (1992-1996); Case Study 6 -- Sierra Leone (2000); Case Study 7 -- Iraq.
Article
This article uses the case study of the reorganisation of the infantry announced in December 2004 to argue that the government undertook reforms that were in the army's interest rather than its own and that the existing schools of thinking within defence fail to explain this behaviour. The article goes on to make three conclusions. Firstly, our tra...
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Corporate Warriors: The Rise of the Privatized Military Industry. By P. W. Singer. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2003. 368p. $39.95. Peter Singer has produced a highly commendable volume for the Cornell Studies in Security Affairs series on an area of study that has received relatively little attention within the academic world. Much of the...
Chapter
Since 1989 Europe has witnessed significant change, the Soviet Union has collapsed and the Warsaw Pact no longer exists, while NATO has found itself involved for the first time in the actual application of force in Yugoslavia. Further afield the end of the Cold War has brought little respite with forces from various European states involved in acti...
Chapter
No government starts with a blank sheet of paper on which to draft out its defence policy, and this chapter sets out the context in which it stood in May 1979. The period from 1945 to 1979 was one of immense change in British defence policy. By 1979 only a few vestiges of what was once the world’s largest empire remained. Europe, rather than the Em...
Chapter
There were three requirements that dictated Heseltine’s replacement. First, the candidate needed to be distinct from the Prime Minister in order to help restore the government’s credibility. Second, there were a number of decisions that Heseltine had postponed which needed to be quickly addressed. This necessitated a familiarity with both the defen...
Chapter
Thatcher had two main requirements for Nott’s successor. First, the need for an effective communicator to counter the influence of CND on public opinion. Second, the willingness to implement a far more businesslike approach within the MOD than had previously been the case.484 Heseltine excelled in both criteria. His oratorical gifts were well known...
Chapter
The January 1981 Cabinet reshuffle was Thatcher’s only attempt at putting one of her inner circle in a position to try and exert control over the MOD.306 Both Thatcher and Howe considered that Nott, with his experience as a former Gurkha officer and his firm commitment to Conservative monetarist policies, would be able to achieve the twin goals of...
Chapter
The new Conservative government was greatly welcomed by the MOD in May 1979 because they promised to be strong on defence and there appeared to be firm support within the Conservative Party and the Cabinet on this issue.159 This perception was reinforced by Francis Pym’s appointment as Secretary of State for Defence. In the words of one former civi...
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As it enters the new millennium, the size, composition and outlook of the Royal Navy promises to be considerably different from the one which existed a mere decade ago. If the Navy is successful in getting its case accepted within the Ministry of Defence (MoD), we could, once again, see a Royal Navy containing relatively large aircraft carriers ear...

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