Andrew R. Davis

Andrew R. Davis
University of Wollongong | UOW · School of Biological Sciences

PhD

About

126
Publications
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Citations

Publications

Publications (126)
Article
Full-text available
Aggressive encounters between invasive and native species are considered a key threat associated with the spread of invasive species. Extrinsic factors such as habitat complexity can profoundly influence the outcome of aggressive interactions between conspecifics, and this may also be the case in invasive‐native species interactions. This study use...
Article
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While estuaries are considered valuable nurseries for many harvested fish species, little quantitative data exists about the spatial scales over which estuaries supply individuals to coastal reefs and how this influences coastal meta‐populations. Quantifying this connectivity between estuaries and coastal reefs will assist the sustainable managemen...
Article
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Remote oceanic islands often display high levels of biodiversity and endemism, making them important locations for marine parks aimed at conserving biodiversity. To determine whether marine parks are reaching conservation objectives requires consistent assessments of their effectiveness through time. Lord Howe Island and Balls Pyramid are World Her...
Article
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The global marine environment has been impacted significantly by climate change. Ocean temperatures are rising, and the frequency, duration and intensity of marine heatwaves are increasing, particularly affecting coral reefs. Coral bleaching events are becoming more common, with less recovery time between events. Anomalous temperatures at the start...
Article
Freshwater crayfish are among the most endangered animal groups in the world. Appropriate management requires an understanding of sampling bias when assessing their distribution and abundance. We evaluated the effectiveness of a variety of sampling methods for detecting freshwater crayfish (genus Euastacus) in situ and potential biases towards indi...
Article
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Stingrays play a key role in the regulation of nearshore ecosystems. However, their movement ecology in high-energy surf areas remains largely unknown due to the notorious difficulties in conducting research in these environments. Using a blimp as an aerial platform for video surveillance, we overcame some of the limitations of other tracking metho...
Article
Millions of recreational boats and ~ 65,000 ocean-going merchant ships anchor routinely. Anchor and chain scour associated with these vessels mechanically disturb the seabed having implications for marine environments globally. Our review summarises the scientific literature that examines the response of biota to anchor scour across five habitats;...
Article
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Conflict between humans and large predators is a longstanding challenge that can present negative consequences for humans and wildlife. Sharks have a global distribution and are considered to pose a potential threat to humans; concurrently many shark species are themselves threatened. Developing strategies for coexistence between humans and this ke...
Article
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Freshwater snails usually possess thin unadorned shells lacking structural components such as spines. Exceptions can be found on the high, well-watered islands of the South Pacific. Streams on these islands support a rich freshwater molluscan fauna with several nerite taxa (Neritimorpha: Neritidae) exhibiting extremely long dorsal spines. We sought...
Article
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While aerial shark spotting has been a standard practice for beach safety for decades, new technologies offer enhanced opportunities, ranging from drones/unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) that provide new viewing capabilities, to new apps that provide beachgoers with up-to-date risk analysis before entering the water. This report describes the Sharke...
Article
Aerial surveys are a powerful means of collecting ecological data in terrestrial and marine systems that may otherwise be difficult to acquire. Increasingly aerial observations are made with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), such as drones. As this technology has improved in reliability and affordability it has replaced the traditional use of fixed-...
Article
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Background Acoustic telemetry has been used with great success to quantify the movements of marine fishes in open habitats, however research has begun to focus on patterns of movement and habitat usage within more structurally complex habitats. To date, there has been no detailed assessment of the performance of acoustic telemetry within seagrass,...
Article
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Marine reserves are an important management tool for conserving local biodiversity and protecting fragile ecosystems such as seagrass that provide significant ecological functions and services to people and the marine environment. With humans placing ever-growing pressure on seagrass habitats, marine reserves also provide an important reference fro...
Article
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Context Whilst the composition and arrangement of habitats within landscape mosaics are known to be important determinants of biodiversity patterns, the influence of seascape patterning and connectivity on temperate reef fish assemblages remains largely unknown. Objectives We examined how habitat patterns at multiple spatial scales (100–1000 m) ex...
Article
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Nerites (Gastropoda: Neritidae) are prominent members of tropical marine and freshwater gastropod faunas and rich assemblages can be found in many streams of islands in the Indo‐Pacific. For example, the streams of Fiji and New Guinea each support at least 23 species of freshwater neritimorphs, with representatives in the genera: Clithon, Neriptero...
Article
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Population densities of invasive species fluctuate spatially and temporally, suggesting that the intensity of their aggressive interactions with native species is similarly variable. Although inter‐specific aggression is often thought to increase with population density, it is often theorized that it should be exceeded by intra‐specific aggression...
Article
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Biological invasions are a major cause of biodiversity loss and, coupled with climate change, will likely have detrimental impacts for native species and the functioning of ecosystems. To mitigate such impacts, it is important to elucidate the behavioural mechanisms underpinning interactions between invasive and native species. Here we examined how...
Article
Non-indigenous invaders may play ecologically similar roles to native species, and this may be reflected in the abundance, richness and composition of associated species assemblages. We investigated whether associations of epifauna with their macroalgal hosts differed between the non-indigenous Codium fragile ssp. fragile and native, congeneric C....
Article
These subantarctic marine invertebrate species, particularly the copepod Harpacticus sp, are acutely susceptible to changes in temperature and salinity in the presence of a contaminant.
Article
Habitat classes are often used as surrogates to represent or capture species assemblages in the design of spatial conservation strategies, such as multi-use marine protected areas (MPAs). Little research, however, has critically evaluated how well habitat classes can reliably predict species distributions and abundances over scales relevant to spat...
Article
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The global oil and gas industry holds a vast archive of Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) inspection footage potentially containing useful long-term data on marine biological communities. With the upcoming era of decommissioning of oil and gas structures, it is timely to assess the usefulness of this footage for researching these communities. We used...
Preprint
The direct impacts of fishing on chondrichthyans (sharks, rays and chimeras) are well established. Here we review a largely unreported, often misinterpreted and poorly understood indirect impact of fishing on these animals — capture-induced parturition (either premature birth or abortion). Although direct mortality of discarded sharks and rays has...
Article
Seagrass habitats worldwide are degrading and becoming fragmented, threatening the important ecosystem services they provide. Fauna associated with seagrasses, particularly cryptic species, are expected to respond to these changes, but are difficult to detect at ecologically meaningful scales using non-extractive techniques. We used a small, wide-a...
Article
Sessile organisms are reliant on the use of refugia or chemical and physical defences to avoid or reduce attacks from predators. Many solitary ascidians possess a thick leathery outer tunic, sometimes reinforced with inorganic inclusions, that generally acts to deter predators. The genus Herdmania is remarkable among ascidians in possessing an abun...
Article
The distribution of intertidal organisms can depend on processes operating early in their life history. The ascidian Pyura praeputialis, a mid- to low-intertidal habitat-forming ecosystem engineer, was strongly associated with specific types of habitat (biogenic vs. bare rock). We examined field patterns and performed laboratory and field experimen...
Article
Seascape variability may confound assessments on the effectiveness of no-take marine reserves (NTMRs) in conserving biodiversity. In most cases baseline data are lacking, resulting in evaluations of NTMR effectiveness being Control Impact (CI) assessments. Even with independent replicate areas among management zones, this approach can make it diffi...
Article
The pervasive effects of invasive ecosystem engineers, that is those species that modify their environment, are well documented, but rarely have the broader impacts of one foundation invertebrate species being replaced by another been examined. In New Zealand, green‐lipped mussels, Perna canaliculus, commonly dominate wave‐exposed rocky shores. The...
Article
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Interspecific aggression is a critical determinant of the success and competitive superiority of many invasive over native species. While single abiotic stressors can alter aggression levels, the manner in which multiple stressors may alter the strength and outcome of interspecific interactions and hence the invasion potential of a species is still p...
Article
Full-text available
The direct impacts of fishing on chondrichthyans (sharks, rays and chimeras) are well established. Here we review a largely unreported, often misinterpreted and poorly understood indirect impact of fishing on these animals — capture-induced parturition (either premature birth or abortion). Although direct mortality of discarded sharks and rays has...
Article
The development of environmental guidelines in the Antarctic and subantarctic is essential, as expansion of research, tourism and fishing places these regions at increasing risk of contamination. Due to unique conditions in these areas, region specific guidelines are required, however there are currently insufficient data to do this. To develop the...
Article
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Dredging can have significant impacts on benthic marine organisms through mechanisms such as sedimentation and reduction in light availability as a result of increased suspension of sediments. Phototrophic marine organisms and those with limited mobility are particularly at risk from the effects of dredging. The potential impacts of dredging on ben...
Article
Investigating the impacts of contamination on high latitude ecosystems includes determining the sensitivity of key taxa to contaminants. Unique characteristics, arising from adaption to cold and stable temperatures has likely resulted in marine biota at the poles being particularly sensitive to contamination in comparison to related species at lowe...
Conference Paper
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The majority of Australia's economic trade is travelled by sea. Over 30,000 vessels visit Australian Ports each year; a figure that continues to grow. Due to safety, timing or operations, it is common for large commercial ships to arrive outside Ports and anchor while awaiting access to berth, yet the environmental impacts resulting from anchoring...
Article
Shipping is critical to global trade and anchoring is a long-held practice for safe and effective ship operations. While it is well established that anchoring or mooring of small recreational vessels has physical impacts on the seafloor and associated biota, the impacts of larger ships on seafloor environments has received little attention. This is...
Article
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Background It is generally considered that on relatively homogenous marine soft sediment habitats, such as sand, fish are unlikely to show site attachment. This poses challenges for management and the evaluation of the efficacy of marine protected areas, in which soft sediments often make up more than 70 % of habitats. The blue-spotted flathead is...
Article
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All prey face a fundamental trade-off between avoiding predation and pursuing activities, such as foraging and mating, that enhance fitness. Therefore, the effects of predation can be both consumptive and nonconsumptive and prey need to assess and respond appropriately to predation risk which in turn varies with environmental and social contexts. W...
Article
A long history of anthropogenic activities in the relatively pristine subantarctic has resulted in areas of accumulated waste and contaminants. Sensitivities to metals of subantarctic and Antarctic species may contrast with related species from temperate and tropical areas, due to the unique characteristics of polar biota. In addition, response to...
Article
Despite the current global decline in seagrass, sessile epifaunal invertebrates inhabiting seagrass ecosystems, particularly sponges and ascidians, have been poorly studied due to their taxonomic complexity. Understanding patterns of distribution of sessile epifaunal communities in seagrass meadows is an important precursor to determining the proce...
Article
Mid-water baited remote underwater video systems (BRUVS) are becoming an increasingly popular tool for examining pelagic fish assemblages in a non-destructive, fisheries independent manner. As the technique is relatively novel, critical methodological questions such as the most appropriate attractant for pelagic fish to mid-water RUVS remain unreso...
Article
Research in marine protected areas (MPAs) needs to focus beyond targeted species to the functional value of MPAs in maintaining ecosystem services and ecological diversity. Estuarine tidal flats are speciose and provide vital ecosystem services but are largely neglected in MPA research. Here, the ecological effect of an MPA on an estuarine tidal fl...
Article
To be effective sentinels, organisms must be able to be readily translocated to contamination hotspots. We sought to assess metal accumulation in genetically-identical explants of a relatively common estuarine sponge, Suberites cf. diversicolor. Explants were transplanted to 7 locations across a metal contamination gradient in a large coastal estua...
Article
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The importance of ‘top-down’ regulation of assemblages by predators is well documented at a variety of spatial and temporal scales on rocky-shores. Predators have consumptive and non-consumptive impacts on their prey; however, much remains to be discovered about how climate change may affect predator-prey interactions and processes related to these...
Article
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Variation in the release and recruitment of larvae of estuarine invertebrates affects the distribution and abundance of adults, as well as trophic interactions in both the plankton and the benthos. Larval release and supply are often timed to environmental cycles such as the diel and tidal cycles. Here, we determined using plankton tows whether the...
Article
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Aim To examine the potential of remotely sensed abiotic measures as surrogates for the abundance, diversity and community composition of temperate rocky reef fishes and sessile invertebrates. Location Batemans Marine Park, south-eastern Australia. Methods We used high-resolution bathymetric side-scan sonar imagery to quantify abiotic measures of...
Article
Large predatory fish that alter the behaviour of smaller species may affect visual estimates of abundance by making organisms more or less difficult to observe and quantify. To evaluate the non-consumptive influence of large predators on rocky reef fishes observed with Baited Remote Underwater Video (BRUV), we tested the hypothesis that fish assemb...
Article
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Networks of no-take marine reserves and partially-protected areas (with limited fishing) are being increasingly promoted as a means of conserving biodiversity. We examined changes in fish assemblages across a network of marine reserves and two different types of partially-protected areas within a marine park over the first 5 years of its establishm...
Article
AimEstuaries are common focal points for industry and development, but often little is known of their biology or ecology, particularly for sessile taxa. We sought to examine how size and opening regime of shallow saline coastal lakes altered patterns of diversity and abundance for a suite of epifaunal invertebrates. We also sought to determine how...
Article
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Baited remote underwater video stations (BRUVS) are increasingly being used to examine assemblages of fishes, yet critical methodological questions related to sampling limitations and bias, such as the influence of bait type, remain poorly understood. At multiple locations, we examined the hypothesis that diversity and abundance in temperate reef f...
Article
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Climate change and ocean acidification will expose marine organisms to synchronous multiple stressors, with early life stages being potentially most vulnerable to changing environmental conditions. We simultaneously exposed encapsulated molluscan embryos to three abiotic stressors-acidified conditions, elevated temperate, and solar UV radiation in...
Data
Outcomes of Tukeys HSD a posteriori comparison for significant Temperature×pH interactions. (DOCX)
Article
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If sponges are to be effective biomonitors we require a better understanding of the spatial scales over which metals vary in these organisms. We determined how concentration of Cd, Zn, Cu, Pb, Hg and Se varied over four spatial scales for two common estuarine sponge species in the Sydney region. We examined variability with a fully nested sampling...
Article
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The most fragile skeletons produced by benthic marine calcifiers are those that larvae and juveniles make to support their bodies. Ocean warming, acidification, decreased carbonate saturation and their interactive effects are likely to impair skeletogenesis. Failure to produce skeleton in a changing ocean has negative implications for a diversity o...
Article
Climate change driven ocean acidification and hypercapnia may have a negative impact on fertilization in marine organisms because of the narcotic effect these stressors exert on sperm. In contrast, warmer, less viscous water may have a positive influence on sperm swimming speed and so ocean warming may enhance fertilization. To address questions on...
Article
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Reproduction and development of Haliotis coccoradiata, a small abalone endemic to southeast Australia, was investigated. The spawning season coincides with the warmer months of the year during the austral spring and summer. Spawning was artificially induced from September to February. By April the spawning season had finished coinciding with the pr...
Article
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As the oceans simultaneously warm, acidify and increase in P(CO2), prospects for marine biota are of concern. Calcifying species may find it difficult to produce their skeleton because ocean acidification decreases calcium carbonate saturation and accompanying hypercapnia suppresses metabolism. However, this may be buffered by enhanced growth and m...
Article
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Shark repulsion devices (SRDs; e. g. Shark Shield T) use an electric field to deter large and potentially dangerous sharks. The use of these devices is becoming increasingly widespread for a range of recreational activities as well as scientific and commercial diving. We sought to determine if SRDs might modify the behaviour of chondrichthyan and o...
Article
Codium fragile ssp. tomentosoides is one of the five most invasive macroalgae worldwide. We compared epiphytic assemblages between native (ssp. tasmanicum and ssp. novae-zelandiae combined) and non-indigenous (ssp. tomentosoides) subspecies of Codium fragile on three rocky intertidal shores in southeast Australia. Twelve species of epiphytes covere...
Article
As a consequence of global warming, environmental conditions such as temperature and salinity are likely to change in near-shore waters. Early life history phases are expected to be particularly vulnerable to changes in these abiotic variables. To evaluate the effect of multiple stressors on the responses of invertebrate larvae, to conditions antic...
Article
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Zeacumantus subcarinatus is an endemic New Zealand gastropod which was first collected in the Sydney region in 1924. Although records have been maintained on the Australian Museum Database, there has been no formal assessment of its distribution and abundance since then. We undertook timed searches for this invader in 32 locations in the Sydney Reg...
Article
Marine invertebrate gametes are being spawned into an ocean simultaneously warming, acidifying and increasing in pCO(2). Decreased pH/increased pCO(2) narcotizes sperm indicating that acidification may impair fertilization, exacerbating problems of sperm limitation, with dire implications for marine life. In contrast, increased temperature may have...
Article
Once non-indigenous species are introduced to a new area, secondary spread is important in determining their ecological and economic impacts. Recreational activities may facilitate the secondary spread of invasive species by creating and transporting viable propagules, however to date there are few manipulative experiments that demonstrate the mech...
Chapter
The orientation of subtidal hard substrata has long been known to play a key role in the assemblage that develops and the assumption has been that the nature of the substratum plays a minor role in this regard. I examine the features of mineral, living and artificial surfaces that affect the development of sessile invertebrate assemblages and find...