Andrew C. Chaulk

Andrew C. Chaulk
The University of Western Ontario | UWO · Department of Biology

Bachelor of Science, Master of Science (In Progress)

About

4
Publications
1,212
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33
Citations
Citations since 2016
2 Research Items
32 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202202468
Introduction
Andrew C. Chaulk currently works at the Department of Biology, Memorial University of Newfoundland. Andrew does research in Genetics, Ecology and Entomology. My current project aims to investigate the potential impacts of landscape heterogeneity and population collapse on the genetic attributes of a metapopulation of the Rocky Mountain Apollo Parnassius smintheus.
Education
September 2017 - August 2021
The University of Western Ontario
Field of study
  • Metapopulation Genetics

Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Full-text available
Culex pipiens L., the northern house mosquito, is the primary vector of West Nile virus to humans along the east coast of North America and thus the focus of much study. This species is an urban container-breeding mosquito whose close contact with humans and flexibility in host choice has led to its classification as a “bridge vector”; that is, it...
Article
Full-text available
Aedes japonicus japonicus (Theobald) (Diptera: Culicidae), the Asian bush mosquito, is a keen biter linked to the transmission to humans of a variety of diseases. It has moved significantly from its historical Asian distribution, with its arrival in North America first noted in 1998 in New York and New Jersey, United States of America. Here we repo...
Article
Arthropod-borne diseases negatively affect humans worldwide. Understanding the biology of the arthropod vectors and the pathogens they harbor, the arthropods are moving targets as a result of climate change, ecosystem degradation, species introductions, and increased human travel. Viruses within the California serogroup of the genus Orthobunyavirus...
Article
Full-text available
Within the gall-inducing thrips of Australia, genus Kladothrips, is a single origin of a soldier caste. A subsequent radiation has led to at least seven social species, and two species that are likely to have independently lost the soldier caste. Both losses of soldiers are connected to a shift in the insects’ host plant. A third inferred host shif...

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