Andrew Butler

Andrew Butler
Eco Logical Australia

PhD, BSc (Hons) Soil Science

About

12
Publications
18,182
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73
Citations
Introduction
Soil Scientist with >30 yrs experience in consultancy, R&D, and resource development in Australia, PNG, SE Asia, Europe & the Middle East. For the past 24 years I have provided consultancy services in soil, landscape and rehabilitation science in various sectors. Main interests are the development of robust criteria for assessing mine rehab, water quality management and effluent irrigation. Certified Professional Soil Scientist, Certified Environmental Practitioner.

Publications

Publications (12)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A critical element of the rehabilitation strategy for the Ok Tedi mine in Papua New Guinea (PNG) is the rehabilitation of the potentially acid forming dredge sand stockpiles at Bige on the banks of the Ok Tedi. Successful long-term mitigation of Acid Rock Drainage (ARD) involves placing a geochemical cover layer over the PAF waste and rehabilitatio...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The progressive development of regulatory requirements and controls (regulatory creep) over the life of an operation can result in environmental monitoring programs with no clear purpose and inefficiencies in data collection and research efforts. This is particularly the case where rehabilitation completion criteria are ill-defined or ambiguous, as...
Article
Within Australia, and arguably more widely, there is a dearth of mine site rehabilitation that has been validated as successful against agreed objectives and targets. One reason for this is the absence of accepted design life and durability standards, applied during the planning and design of major mine wastes landforms such as tailings storage fac...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Despite extensive knowledge of the rehabilitation process and component parts, and contrary to numerous publications, demonstrations of successful mine rehabilitation outcomes are scarce. Haymont (2012) for example notes that in some parts of Australia there are significant areas of mining disturbance that cannot be relinquished. One reason for thi...
Conference Paper
Mount Margaret Mine (MMM) is located near Cloncurry in NW Queensland. Copper/gold/magnetite ore was mined from several open pits and processed at Ernest Henry Mine (EHM). With no tailings dam, the main residual risk at MMM is the potential for off-site migration of acid mine drainage (AMD) or neutral mine drainage (NMD) from potentially acid formin...
Conference Paper
A review of the international literature indicated that at least 15 additional cobalt toxicity studies had been published since 2000, sufficient to derive a high reliability cobalt Guideline Value (GV) using the protocols developed for the revision of the ANZECC/ARMCANZ Water Quality Guidelines (the Guidelines). This presented an opportunity to imp...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The progressive development of regulatory requirements and controls (regulatory creep) over the life of an operation can result in environmental monitoring programs with no clear purpose and inefficiencies in data collection and research efforts. This is particularly the case where rehabilitation completion criteria are ill-defined or ambiguous, as...
Article
Full-text available
A fall in herbage production has been observed on Denbigh series soils in Wales after several years in permanent pasture. In practice this is shown as a poor response to fertiliser N. Under intensive grazing systems a zone of compaction develops at a depth of 8-12 cm. leading to shallow rooting and the appearence of stagnogley features in the surfa...
Article
In the autumn of 1983, 5 wheel-compaction treatments, including zero traffic, lowground-pressure traffic, medium and heavy combine harvester and tractor traffic, were applied to a silt loam in southern England before direct drilling winter wheat. In the compact soil, crop establishment was more uniform than in the unwheeled soil, but wheeling did n...
Article
Full-text available
In the autumn of 1983, five wheel-compaction treatments, including zero traffic, low-ground-pressure traffic, medium and heavy combine harvester traffic (maximum axle loads up to 13.2 t, maximum tyre inflation pressures up to 118 kPa) were applied to a silt loam soil before direct-drilling winter wheat. The soil had not been cultivated in the prece...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Manuscript of a paper on this topic has been accepted for publication in J. Cleaner Production - following is from the abstract. It is aimed at promoting discussion/action on tackling (planning. management, regulation, responsibility, financing) long term/residual risks associated with waste rock dumps and tailings dams. Within Australia, and arguably more widely, there is a dearth of mine site rehabilitation that has been validated as successful against agreed objectives and targets. One reason for this is the absence of accepted design life and durability standards, applied during the planning and design of major mine wastes landforms such as tailings storage facilities and waste rock dumps, against which performance can be assessed. The themes of design life and durability have been applied in other engineering disciplines such as construction, manufacturing, and transport infrastructure. Therefore, the template exists; albeit its application to mine wastes landforms is more complex, given the uniqueness of each mine site and the materials available for landform construction. Given the poor rehabilitation performance of the industry to date, an increasingly informed and sceptical public may no longer accept assurances that structures will be risk free for periods of 1000 years or more. In view of this, the industry and the regulator must present realistic expectations and be clear about, and have mechanisms in place to manage, residual risks. This paper aims to address this question and provides a framework around which standards that account for different levels of risk can be developed for design life and durability for engineered mine wastes structures.