Andrew J Bremner

Andrew J Bremner
University of Birmingham · School of Psychology

DPhil

About

81
Publications
26,990
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2,185
Citations
Introduction
Additional affiliations
June 2015 - October 2015
Goldsmiths, University of London
Position
  • Professor of Psychology and Head of Department

Publications

Publications (81)
Article
Full-text available
Congenitally blind infants are not only deprived of visual input but also of visual influences on the intact senses. The important role that vision plays in the early development of multisensory spatial perception1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 (e.g., in crossmodal calibration8, 9, 10 and in the formation of multisensory spatial representations of the body and...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to resist distracting stimuli whilst voluntarily focusing on a task is fundamental to our everyday cognitive functioning. Here, we investigated how this ability develops, and thereafter declines, across the lifespan using a single task/experiment. Young children (5–7 years), older children (10–11 years), young adults (20–27 years), and...
Preprint
Children’s and adults’ body representation is constrained by bottom-up multisensory information and by top-down knowledge on possible postures. Using the rubber hand illusion paradigm, this study (N = 229) investigates whether different fake hand sizes (60%, 80%, 100%, 120% or 140% of typical hand size) constrain embodiment in three age groups (6-...
Article
Full-text available
Two experiments examined perceptual colocation of visual and tactile stimuli in young infants. Experiment 1 compared 4- (n = 15) and 6-month-old (n = 12) infants' visual preferences for visual-tactile stimulus pairs presented across the same or different feet. The 4- and 6-month-olds showed, respectively, preferences for colocated and noncolocated...
Preprint
Full-text available
The influence of visual object motion on the processing of bodily events offers a marker for the development of human infants' perception of themselves in peripersonal space. We presented 4- (n = 20) and 8-month-old (n = 20) infants with an unattended visual object moving towards or away from their body followed by a vibrotactile stimulus on their...
Article
Full-text available
Adults’ body representation is constrained by multisensory information and knowledge of the body such as its possible postures. This study (N = 180) tested for similar constraints in children. Using the rubber hand illusion with adults and 6‐ to 7‐year olds, we measured proprioceptive drift (an index of hand localization) and ratings of felt hand o...
Article
Tactile perception is referenced to, and modulated by, body parts and their boundaries. For example, tactile distances presented over the wrist are perceptually elongated relative to those presented within the hand or arm. This phenomenon is argued to result from a segmentation of tactile space according to body parts and their boundaries, i.e., to...
Article
Observing others being touched activates similar brain areas as those activated when one experiences a touch oneself. Event-related potential (ERP) studies have revealed that modulation of somatosensory components by observed touch occurs within 100 ms after stimulus onset, and such vicarious effects have been taken as evidence for empathy for othe...
Chapter
We consider two aspects of the development of multisensory processing. First, we review empirical findings on the development of audiovisual perception in infancy, the effects of early experience on this process, and the way in which changes in selective attention affect infant response to audiovisual inputs. We show that audiovisual perceptual abi...
Preprint
Adults’ body representation is constrained by multisensory information and knowledge of the body such as its possible postures. This study (N = 180) tested for similar constraints in children. Using the rubber hand illusion with adults and 6- to 7-year-olds, we measured proprioceptive drift (an index of hand localisation) and ratings of felt hand o...
Article
Full-text available
When newborns leave the enclosed spatial environment of the uterus and arrive in the outside world, they are faced with a new audiovisual environment of dynamic objects, actions and events both close to themselves and further away. One particular challenge concerns matching and making sense of the visual and auditory cues specifying object motion....
Article
We present the first empirical evidence that experience alters lightness perception. The role of experience in lightness perception was investigated through a cross-cultural comparison of 2 visual contrast phenomena: simultaneous lightness contrast and White’s illusion. The Himba, a traditional seminomadic group known to have a local bias in percep...
Article
An ability to detect the common location of multisensory stimulation is essential for us to perceive a coherent environment, to represent the interface between the body and the external world, and to act on sensory information. Regarding the tactile environment "at hand", we need to represent somatosensory stimuli impinging on the skin surface in t...
Article
Full-text available
The human brain recruits similar brain regions when a state is experienced (e.g., touch, pain, actions) and when that state is passively observed in other individuals. In adults, seeing other people being touched activates similar brain areas as when we experience touch ourselves. Here we show that already by four months of age, cortical responses...
Article
A new study reveals the effects of visual deprivation in early life on the development of multisensory simultaneity perception. To understand the developmental processes underlying this we need to consider the multisensory milieu of the newborn infant.
Article
The present work investigates the development of bodily self-consciousness and its relation to multisensory bodily information, by measuring for the first time the development of responses to the full body illusion in childhood. We tested three age groups of children: 6- to 7-year-olds (n=28); 8- to 9-year-olds (n=21); 10- to 11-year-olds (n=19), a...
Article
Full-text available
When localizing touches to the hands, typically developing children and adults show a “crossed hands effect” whereby identifying which hand received a tactile stimulus is less accurate when the hands are crossed than uncrossed. This demonstrates the use of an external frame of reference for locating touches to one’s own body. Given that studies ind...
Chapter
Touch is the first of our senses to develop, providing us with the sensory scaffold on which we come to perceive our own bodies and our sense of self. Touch also provides us with direct access to the external world of physical objects, via haptic exploration. Furthermore, a recent area of interest in tactile research across studies of developing ch...
Article
An ability to perceive tactile and visual stimuli in a common spatial frame of reference is a crucial ingredient in forming a representation of one’s own body and the interface between bodily and external space. In this study, the authors investigated young infants’ abilities to perceive colocation between tactile and visual stimuli presented on th...
Article
In executing purposeful actions, adults select sufficient and necessary limbs. But infants often move goal-irrelevant limbs, suggesting a developmental process of motor specialization. Two experiments with 9- and 12-month-olds revealed gradual decreases in extraneous movements in non-acting limbs during unimanual actions. In Experiment 1, 9-month-o...
Article
Studies show that touch in adults is referenced to a representation of the body that is structured topologically according to body parts; the perceived distance between two stimuli crossing over a body part boundary is elongated relative to the perceived distance between two stimuli presented within one body part category. Here we investigate this...
Article
Full-text available
The development of visual context effects in the Ebbinghaus illusion in the United Kingdom and in remote and urban Namibians (UN) was investigated (N = 336). Remote traditional Himba children showed no illusion up until 9–10 years, whereas UK children showed a robust illusion from 7 to 8 years of age. Greater illusion in UK than in traditional Himb...
Article
This article lays out the computational challenges involved in constructing multisensory representations of the body and the interface between the body and the external world. It then provides a review of the most pertinent empirical literature regarding the ontogeny of such representational abilities in early life, focussing especially on ability...
Article
A new study reveals that the integration of multiple visual depth cues in visual cortex develops surprisingly late in human childhood.
Article
Human newborns can resolve some response conflicts in order to adapt their behaviour, suggesting that the newborn has consciousness according to Morsella et al.'s framework. However, we pose a range of developmental questions regarding Morsella et al.'s account, especially concerning the role of consciousness in the development of action.
Article
Arriving in the outside world, the newborn infant has to determine how the tactile stimulation experienced in utero relates to the spatial environment newly offered up by vision, hearing and olfaction. We investigated this developmental process by tracing the origins of the influence of external spatial representation on young infants’ orienting re...
Article
A new study reveals the action of a rapid process by which our perceptual systems adapt to improve the localization of touches when our limbs are in novel postures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Article
The skin contains a wide variety of receptors that give rise to our experience of touch. Tactile experience depends on attention, and is typically the result of multisensory integration. Many of our tactile experiences are the result of the integration of inputs from different classes of receptors - known as touch blends. The sense of touch is an i...
Article
Full-text available
When we sense a touch, our brains take account of our current limb position to determine the location of that touch in external space [1, 2]. Here we show that changes in the way the brain processes somatosensory information in the first year of life underlie the origins of this ability [3]. In three experiments we recorded somatosensory evoked pot...
Article
Adults show a deficit in their ability to localize tactile stimuli to their hands when their arms are in the less familiar, crossed posture. It is thought that this ‘crossed-hands deficit’ arises due to a conflict between the anatomical and external spatial frames of reference within which touches can be encoded. The ability to localize a single ta...
Data
Our daily perceptual experiences are, almost without exception, multisensory. We perceive the objects, events and people around us through a range of sensory modalities which convey overlapping and complementary streams of information about our environment and ourselves. A person's face, the sound of their voice, the way they touch us, and even the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Observing an action performed by another person is known to modulate activity in sensorimotor regions of the brain, in both adults and infants. Our research is investigating the effects in infants of observing actions towards food, specifically hand-to-mouth actions, with the rationale that the neural effects of observing such actions might partly...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the electrophysiological correlates of somatosensory processing under different arm postures by recording event-related potentials at frontal, central and centroparietal sites during tactile stimulation of the hands. Short series of 200 ms vibrotactile stimuli were presented to the palms of the participants' hands, one hand at a tim...
Article
A number of recent findings indicate that the multisensory processes underlying our ability to localize our limbs continue to undergo development beyond infancy and across childhood. Here we review findings from our recent investigations of the development of multisensory bodily illusions in early life (see Bremner et al., 2013; Cowie et al., in pr...
Article
By definition, developmental disorders of the brain and nervous system have their onset during early development. This early onset has important connotations for how we can characterize a disorder and its causal origins; the phenotypical outcome will be the result of an interaction between the initial atypical state of the individual and the subseq...
Article
Western participants consistently match certain shapes with particular speech sounds, tastes, and flavours. Here we demonstrate that the ‘Bouba–Kiki effect’, a well-known shape–sound symbolism effect commonly observed in Western participants, is also observable in the Himba of Northern Namibia, a remote population with little exposure to Western cu...
Article
Full-text available
The bodily self is constructed from multisensory information. However, little is known of the relation between multisensory development and the emerging sense of self. We investigated this question by measuring the strength of the rubber-hand illusion in young children (4 to 9 years old) and adults. Intermanual pointing showed that children were as...
Article
Full-text available
We examined the visual capture of perceived hand position in forty-five 5- to 7-year-olds and in fifteen young adults, using a mirror illusion task. In this task, participants see their left hand on both the left and right (by virtue of a mirror placed at the midline facing the left arm, and obscuring the right). The accuracy of participants' reach...
Article
Full-text available
Local, as opposed to global, perceptual bias has been linked to a lesser ability to attend globally. We examined this proposed link in Himba observers, members of a remote Namibian population who have demonstrated a strong local bias compared with British observers. If local perceptual bias is related to a lesser ability to attend globally, Himba o...
Article
Full-text available
Recent evidence suggests that the mirror neuron system responds to the goals of actions, even when the end of the movement is hidden from view. To investigate whether this predictive ability might be based on the detection of early differences between actions with different outcomes, we used electromyography (EMG) and motion tracking to assess whet...
Article
Adults show a deficit in their ability to localize tactile stimuli to their hands when their arms are in the less familiar, crossed posture (e.g., Overvliet et al., 2011; Shore et al., 2002). It is thought that this ‘crossed-hands effect’ arises due to conflict (when the hands are crossed) between the anatomical and external frames of reference wit...
Chapter
This chapter presents a review of research concerning multisensory processing impairments in three developmental disorders: developmental coordination disorder (DCD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and developmental dyslexia (DD). By comparing multisensory processes across these three disorders, a number of similarities in sensory responses were n...
Article
Full-text available
This chapter reviews research directed at tracking the development of multisensory representations of the body, limbs, and the near-to-hand environment in infancy and early childhood. The focus is on the development of the multisensory processes involved in the representation of the body in a canonical posture, and more dynamic forms of multisensor...
Article
After extensive consultation, thorough updating, inclusion of new research and topics, and the addition of a fantastic new online learning platform, Psychology: The Science of Mind and Behaviour is better than ever. The second edition is an engaging and exciting introduction to the study of psychology. This book's scientific approach, which brings...
Article
Information about where our hands are arises from different sensory modalities; chiefly proprioception and vision. These inputs differ in variability from situation to situation (or task to task). According to the idea of ‘optimal integration’, the information provided by different sources is combined in proportion to their relative reliabilities,...
Article
Tactile distance judgments are prone to a number of physiological and perceptual distortions. One such distortion concerns tactile distances over the wrist being perceptually elongated relative to those within the hand or arm. This has been interpreted as a categorical segmentation effect: The wrist implicitly serves as a partition between two body...
Article
Full-text available
Research into perceptual and cognitive development has, with notable exceptions, neglected both multi-sensory processes, and embodied representations. In an attempt to address these issues, I will describe our programme of research tracing the early development of multisensory representations of the hand. I will mention several studies currently be...
Article
Full-text available
Computational models can be outlined into two distinct kinds: symbolic models and connectionist models. One particular focus of computational modeling research has been the development of object interactions during infancy. In this chapter, the authors describe a number of computational approaches to understand the developing object concept, focusi...
Article
There is substantial evidence that populations in the Western world exhibit a local bias compared to East Asian populations that is widely ascribed to a difference between individualistic and collectivist societies. However, we report that traditional Himba - a remote interdependent society - exhibit a strong local bias compared to both Japanese an...
Article
An unexpected stimulus often remains unnoticed if attention is focused elsewhere. This inattentional blindness has been shown to be increased under conditions of high memory load. Here we show that increasing working memory load can also have the opposite effect of reducing inattentional blindness (i.e., improving stimulus detection) if stimulus de...
Article
Three UK studies on the relationship between a purpose‐built instrument to assess the importance and development of 15 ‘soft skills’ are reported. Study 1 (N = 444) identified strong latent components underlying these soft skills, such that differences between‐skills were over‐shadowed by differences between‐students. Importance and improving ratin...
Article
A significant challenge in developing spatial representations for the control of action is one of multisensory integration. Specifically, we require an ability to efficiently integrate sensory information arriving from multiple modalities pertaining to the relationships between the acting limbs and the nearby external world (i.e. peripersonal space...
Article
Mareschal and his colleagues argue that cognition consists of partial representations emerging from organismic constraints placed on information processing through development. However, any notion of constraints must consider multiple sensory modalities, and their gradual integration across development. Multisensory integration constitutes one impo...
Article
Full-text available
Two experiments investigated infants' ability to localize tactile sensations in peripersonal space. Infants aged 10 months (Experiment 1) and 6.5 months (Experiment 2) were presented with vibrotactile stimuli unpredictably to either hand while they adopted either a crossed- or uncrossed-hands posture. At 6.5 months, infants' responses were predomin...
Article
Full-text available
In a series of experiments we tested 4- and 8-month-olds’ ability to represent the spatial layout of an object across changes in its orientation with respect to egocentric spatial coordinates. A fixed-trial familiarization procedure based on visual habituation behaviour shows that both age groups are able to discriminate between different object-ce...
Article
Under incidental instructions, thirty-eight 2-year-olds were trained on a six-element deterministic sequence of spatial locations. Following training, subjects were informed of the presence of a sequence and asked to either reproduce or suppress the learned material. Children's production of the trained sequence was modulated by these instructions....
Article
An appreciation of object-centred spatial relations involves representing a 'within-object' spatial relation across changes in the object orientation. This representational ability is important in adult object recognition [Biederman, I. (1987). Recognition-by-components: A theory of human image understanding. Psychological Review, 94, 115-147; Marr...
Article
Full-text available
This chapter comprises an experimental examination of biases in infants memory for hidden objects, and presents the findings of a neural network designed to model the findings and create some novel predictions.
Chapter
Book synopsis: This new volume in the highy cited and critically acclaimed Attention and Performance series is the first to provide a systematic investigation into the processes of change in mental development. It brings together world class scientists to address brain and cognitive development at several different levels, including phylogeny, gene...
Article
The errors made by infants in the AB task were taken by Piaget as an indication of an inability to update their representations of the spatial location of a hidden object. This paper presents an experiment designed to further investigate the role of spatial representations in the production of the error. The introduction of strong visual cues to sp...
Article
BLDSC reference no.: D225157. Supervisor:Peter Bryant. Thesis (D. Phil.)--University of Oxford, 2003. Includes bibliographical references.

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